2 replaced http://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/ with https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/
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Many of the other answers provide some useful information, but the spirit of the question seems to be: "If I have to use [website name] to access my wallet, which I have chosen from a list of competing service options, what happens if that website goes offline?"

What's important to remember is that the wallet is not actually on any of these websites - or even on your computer if you create one locally. Another answer suggested that the solution is to never use a website and only use a computer, but that doesn't properly address the question because it could just be rephrased as "what happens if my computer burns up in a fire along with all my backups"

The answer is that many websites, along with offline programs, allow you to import/export you wallet. These are all the same address so they synchronize together. If it is an encrypted wallet you need to know the pass phrase that was randomly generated when the wallet was created. In the event that you don't know the pass phrase the wallet is gone forever. If you have the pass phrase, but never bothered to create a backup, there are steps you can follow that will allow you to recover the information needed to import to any other wallet service and continue.

So to answer the spirit of your question: As long as to take some personal responsibility to secure your own information the wallet will remain accessible to you even if a given service goes under.

There is an answer over hereover here that goes into detail on how to recover your wallet.

In the event that you neglect to secure your wallet, and the service goes under, the Bitcoins still exist, but they will never be used by anyone ever.

If you are still concerned you could use the paper wallet feature. As explained here, this involves taking your Bitcoins offline and storing on a code on paper just like dollars. Of course, this makes them as secure (or not) as real physical dollar bills.

Many of the other answers provide some useful information, but the spirit of the question seems to be: "If I have to use [website name] to access my wallet, which I have chosen from a list of competing service options, what happens if that website goes offline?"

What's important to remember is that the wallet is not actually on any of these websites - or even on your computer if you create one locally. Another answer suggested that the solution is to never use a website and only use a computer, but that doesn't properly address the question because it could just be rephrased as "what happens if my computer burns up in a fire along with all my backups"

The answer is that many websites, along with offline programs, allow you to import/export you wallet. These are all the same address so they synchronize together. If it is an encrypted wallet you need to know the pass phrase that was randomly generated when the wallet was created. In the event that you don't know the pass phrase the wallet is gone forever. If you have the pass phrase, but never bothered to create a backup, there are steps you can follow that will allow you to recover the information needed to import to any other wallet service and continue.

So to answer the spirit of your question: As long as to take some personal responsibility to secure your own information the wallet will remain accessible to you even if a given service goes under.

There is an answer over here that goes into detail on how to recover your wallet.

In the event that you neglect to secure your wallet, and the service goes under, the Bitcoins still exist, but they will never be used by anyone ever.

If you are still concerned you could use the paper wallet feature. As explained here, this involves taking your Bitcoins offline and storing on a code on paper just like dollars. Of course, this makes them as secure (or not) as real physical dollar bills.

Many of the other answers provide some useful information, but the spirit of the question seems to be: "If I have to use [website name] to access my wallet, which I have chosen from a list of competing service options, what happens if that website goes offline?"

What's important to remember is that the wallet is not actually on any of these websites - or even on your computer if you create one locally. Another answer suggested that the solution is to never use a website and only use a computer, but that doesn't properly address the question because it could just be rephrased as "what happens if my computer burns up in a fire along with all my backups"

The answer is that many websites, along with offline programs, allow you to import/export you wallet. These are all the same address so they synchronize together. If it is an encrypted wallet you need to know the pass phrase that was randomly generated when the wallet was created. In the event that you don't know the pass phrase the wallet is gone forever. If you have the pass phrase, but never bothered to create a backup, there are steps you can follow that will allow you to recover the information needed to import to any other wallet service and continue.

So to answer the spirit of your question: As long as to take some personal responsibility to secure your own information the wallet will remain accessible to you even if a given service goes under.

There is an answer over here that goes into detail on how to recover your wallet.

In the event that you neglect to secure your wallet, and the service goes under, the Bitcoins still exist, but they will never be used by anyone ever.

If you are still concerned you could use the paper wallet feature. As explained here, this involves taking your Bitcoins offline and storing on a code on paper just like dollars. Of course, this makes them as secure (or not) as real physical dollar bills.

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source | link

Many of the other answers provide some useful information, but the spirit of the question seems to be: "If I have to use [website name] to access my wallet, which I have chosen from a list of competing service options, what happens if that website goes offline?"

What's important to remember is that the wallet is not actually on any of these websites - or even on your computer if you create one locally. Another answer suggested that the solution is to never use a website and only use a computer, but that doesn't properly address the question because it could just be rephrased as "what happens if my computer burns up in a fire along with all my backups"

The answer is that many websites, along with offline programs, allow you to import/export you wallet. These are all the same address so they synchronize together. If it is an encrypted wallet you need to know the pass phrase that was randomly generated when the wallet was created. In the event that you don't know the pass phrase the wallet is gone forever. If you have the pass phrase, but never bothered to create a backup, there are steps you can follow that will allow you to recover the information needed to import to any other wallet service and continue.

So to answer the spirit of your question: As long as to take some personal responsibility to secure your own information the wallet will remain accessible to you even if a given service goes under.

There is an answer over here that goes into detail on how to recover your wallet.

In the event that you neglect to secure your wallet, and the service goes under, the Bitcoins still exist, but they will never be used by anyone ever.

If you are still concerned you could use the paper wallet feature. As explained here, this involves taking your Bitcoins offline and storing on a code on paper just like dollars. Of course, this makes them as secure (or not) as real physical dollar bills.