0

How I can install Bitcoin Core Light Node (not Full Node) on a CentOs server? That I can use it with bitcoind and bitcoind-cli and RPC (https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Original_Bitcoin_client/API_calls_list / https://developer.bitcoin.org/reference/).

Thanks.

3
  • 3
    Bitcoin Core is solely a fully-validating node, it has no light mode. Jan 23 at 0:36
  • Okay, maybe I have the terminology wrong. How can I use bitcoind locally without deploying a full node for RPC? For example: bash curl --data-binary '{"jsonrpc":"2.0","method":"listaccounts","params":[]}' -H 'content-type:text/plain;' http://user:[email protected]:8332/ Jan 23 at 1:07
  • 3
    You cannot. Bitcoin Core is a full node. You can use other software perhaps that does what you want, like lightweight wallet software, but it won't be called bitcoind and you won't interact with it through the same JSON-RPC interface. Jan 23 at 1:14

1 Answer 1

0

How I can install Bitcoin Core Light Node (not Full Node) ...

You can't, because that product does not exist in a "light[weight] node" version.

Perhaps running it in pruning mode would meet your needs?

... on a CentOs server?

I'm pretty sure CentOS was absorbed by RedHat and has been replaced by RedHat's "CentOS Stream". At least, it may be worth checking whether CentOS and its surviving package repositories still meet your longer term needs.

See RedHat: What is CentOS

CentOS is an open source project that releases 2 distinct Linux® distributions, CentOS Stream and CentOS Linux. CentOS Stream is the upstream development platform for upcoming Red Hat® Enterprise Linux product releases.

The CentOS Project will discontinue updates and releases of CentOS Linux® between 2021 and 2024. This means current CentOS Linux users will need to choose a migration path.

1
  • >> Perhaps running it in pruning mode would meet your needs? Yep, already running. Thanks. Jan 23 at 15:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.