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Every certain number of blocks the reward is cut in half, for example from 50 to 25 BTC. Will this halving continue indefinitely, so the reward never gets to zero?

marked as duplicate by Colin Dean, pyramids, Murch, Salvador Dali, Stéphane Gimenez Nov 28 '13 at 9:56

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It will, one day, reach 0, which mean mining wont be possible anymore (or it wont just be worth it). and by 0, I mean it could be 0.000001.

But if you look at it in a mathematical way, it should never end. Try that with a calculator, the number becomes really small.

The Bitcoin network is made so there will be a limited number of coins available and they have to be generated at a predictable rate, thats also why there is a difficulty on the mining

  • I know it will get very small, but it will never actually reach 0? So the target number of bitcoins will never actually be reached? – RentFree Nov 27 '13 at 21:36
  • If you look at the link below (which is a similar question to this one) you will read that there should only be 32 halvings. If the precision is not increased it WILL reach 0 bitcoin.stackexchange.com/questions/5545/… – TheBird956 Nov 27 '13 at 21:39
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    mining will be critical when the reward = 0 because it is required to confirm transactions. The volume of transactions and the included fees will still make mining valuable to the network. Mining was not designed to be highly profitable, it was supposed to help secure the network and offer a little reward to the miners. I doubt Satoshi foresaw the ASIC race that we are seeing today. – Mark S. Nov 28 '13 at 0:21
  • It is also a pretty steep argument to assume that mining will not be profitable just because today the transaction fees wouldn't support the mining expenses. When the halving ends in more than one hundred years, either Bitcoin will have failed or there will be sufficient shareholders bound to lose a lot if mining fails - they will be putting some money into the fee pot. – Murch Dec 4 '13 at 7:38

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