1

Please help me end this argument.

How is 'scrypt' pronounced?

Could it be pronounced "script"? "Es Crypt"? "skriped"?

Thank you.

4
  • 3
    This is a question about English grammar – Emre Kenci Dec 9 '13 at 8:34
  • 1
    This is a question about English pronunciation, not grammar, for a security-related technical term. I wonder if it would be better at the information security branch of stackexchange? – pyramids Dec 9 '13 at 11:18
  • I cross-posted this question to information security. – pyramids Dec 9 '13 at 11:25
  • It's about the pronunciation of a denotation in English. – Murch Dec 9 '13 at 23:12
4

I do not think there is a formal convention. Your best bet is probably to inquire at the inventor, the one-man company tarsnap. Start at their webpage about scrypt.

Since the important point is cryptographic security and because of their unix-like naming (tarsnap!), I'd say this probably follows the same convention that makes ssh the secure shell. Hence my personal preference is to emphasize it as s(ecure) crypt(ographic grade hash), and hence favor the pronunciation s - crypt, but you see from the sheer amount of parenthesis I need to explain just how individualistic this interpretation may be.

EDIT: I am feeling somewhat dissatisfied by my own answer, and hence have sought other opinions, even at the risk of committing the sin of cross-posting. It seems to be a difficult question because the technical communities tend to declare language issues off-topic. I sympathize, myself often preferring the technical or logical content over issues of syntax, irrelevant semantic nuances, or indeed pronunciation. Yet on the English branch of Stackexchange at least the initial comments go in the direction that the technical community of all the people using scrypt as a word decides. This appears to be circular referencing. Hence I don't even know where we could have migrated the question to if we decide it is off-topic here.

5

The most common pronunciation I have heard is /skript/

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.