0

I have read the wiki page and I would like some further and more technical(if possible) confirmation for a few things. A bitcoin node is a user which is connected to the network through a client. This node can perform transactions, try to build a block inside a mining pool, or just exist in the network. Are there any further actions for a node? If a node exists inside the network how can he verify the transactions? Furthermore is there a paper or something that explains things in a lower level of how exactly the system works in case of transactions and mining? I do not want a description but something more technical.

1

A bitcoin node is a user which is connected to the network through a client. This node can perform transactions, try to build a block inside a mining pool, or just exist in the network. Are there any further actions for a node?

Nodes also relay blocks and transactions to other nodes. They also validate incoming blocks and transactions and keep track of the current, longest valid blockchain. That's pretty much it.

If a node exists inside the network how can he verify the transactions?

There are a set of mathematical rules that determine if transactions are valid. The nodes check the transactions against those rules. If they meet the rules, they are valid.

Furthermore is there a paper or something that explains things in a lower level of how exactly the system works in case of transactions and mining? I do not want a description but something more technical.

Almost every question you can think of is answered, in technical detail, somewhere in the Bitcoin wiki.

  • I am seeking more information about how transactions / blocks are relayed and how they are validated. Can you point me to some reference in the wiki or to some other point? – angel limneos Jan 5 '14 at 14:19
  • @angellimneos Start with the whitepaper. – David Schwartz Jan 5 '14 at 18:44

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.