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Recently I managed to get my hands on 10 servers with 32 cores each and 128GB ram each. I realised that in 10 hours of working at 100% I had mined exactly 0 litecoins using a p2pool. I think it's called mint.

I was delivering an average of 1,6 MH/s to the pool. I was in the TOP 3 active miners of the pool.

My mining layout is: One CPUminer (minerd) per server with one thread per core all pointing to the same pool with the same username (litecoin wallet address).

Does anyone have any clue why this is happening? Is it a technical problem or was I just purely and simply tricked?

  • Welcome to the world of PPLNS pools. You're much better off trying a PPS pool, as they tend to be much more balanced compared to the hash rate. – Richard J. Ross III Jan 14 '14 at 12:10
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According to the crypto-coins' profitability calculator coinwarz, with that much hash power you could have a gross daily earning of about US $14 should you mine Dogecoins and not Litecoins. Mining Litecoins instead, theoretically you could earn about US $11 per day.

Most of the times it's much more profitable to mine an alt-coin than the grand-daddies of them all (i.e. Bitecoin and Litecoin). The problem is, of course, you need to have wallets for those alt-coins and open an account at an exchange that accepts them to get bitcoins or dollars for them.

How many blocks per day is your pool finding? You won't be paid at all until/unless your pool finds a block. That statistic will give you an idea of how often you'd be paid.

In "normal" pools the whole blocks' reward goes to the pool administrator who then pays miners their share -according to the hash power they've provided- minus his fee, so there's a bag of coins (coming from fees) whence to pay you should the pool find no blocks in some time.

Since p2pools lack (by design) a central administrator, you're forced to wait until it finds a block. The pro is you don't have to trust an admin. to be fair and honest, only source code you can audit/inspect should you know how to.

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