1

For a given transaction, I have its incoming transactions and I am trying to get the number of the block of those transactions. This seems like something that cannot achieve directly.

I am working on python with Json RPC and I want to work directly on the block-chain on my computer and not to use online API such as blockchain.info.

How can I get efficiently the block number of a given transaction?

  • In what way specifically do you mean? Like through an API or something. You obviously don't mean manually, right? The block for this transaction is listed at the bottom. – 4276 Jun 6 '14 at 5:27
  • you are right, I should have write that: I am working on python with Json RPC and I want to work directly on the block-chain on my computer and not to use blockchain.info. – slouis Jun 6 '14 at 7:06
2

According to the Wiki, the gettransaction <txid> call return a JSON object with the following information

"amount" : total amount of the transaction
"confirmations" : number of confirmations of the transaction
"txid" : the transaction ID
"time" : time associated with the transaction[1].
"details" - An array of objects containing:
"account"
"address"
"category"
"amount"
"fee"

Now just use getblockcount and subtract "confirmations" of the JSON object.

  • Thank you Jori, your approach is probably the best. the problem is that getblockcount is not static (changes over time), hence if I have a bunch of transactions SAVED for more than ~10 min I can't work with your method. But maybe that the best way...Thanks! – slouis Jun 6 '14 at 8:10
  • @slouis don't forget to vote and select if this answer works for you. – 4276 Jun 6 '14 at 8:24
  • @slouis "confirmations" isn't static either, but the difference between it and getblockcount should be. This would work even if you have your transactions laying around for a year. – Jori Jun 6 '14 at 9:11
  • Not if I am saving the whole transaction. But I got the idea. Thanks! – slouis Jun 6 '14 at 10:17
  • I'm afraid that I don't understand what you mean by that. – Jori Jun 6 '14 at 10:34

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