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Is it possible to retrieve the name of the pool that mined a block looking at the address in the coinbase transaction?

For example, the address in the coinbase transaction of block 00000000000000000002dce191b529017edae3c76d91ab21f757d156daebf43f is: 1KFHE7w8BhaENAswwryaoccDb6qcT6DbYY. From Blockchain Explorer, that block has been mined by F2pool. Is there a way to associate F2pool with 1KFHE7w8BhaENAswwryaoccDb6qcT6DbYY?

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Although is may be possible to associate addresses that appear in coinbase transactions with mining pools, this relationship can be quickly broken - because they can easily change this address - and that's not how tipically mining pools are identified.

Mining pools/miners that want to identify themselves do so in the scriptsig of the coinbase. In your example, the scriptSig is:

03404a092cfabe6d6d5995dc2134639c494208abda86747b0f77fe5b92e9456a85974f452f51a3da0910000000f09f909f00144d696e6564206279206365616d6b7978696c6f6f000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000005001f450000.

If you decode this hexadecimal number to ascii, you get: @J ,ú¾mmYÜ!4cIB«Út{wþ[éEjOE/Q£Ú ðMined by ceamkyxilooE

You can see that it contains the string Mined by ceamkyxiloo, which is what identifies F2pool. Most of the decoded text is unintelligible because this field (expect the first ~4 bytes) are used to create entropy during mining - what is called "extra nonce".

Most block explorers keep a mapping of these signatures to miners/mining pools. Here is an (outdated) mapping.

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    Keep in mind: anyone can add Mined by ceamkyxiloo (or similar) to the scriptsig of a coinbase output, so it isn't a foolproof method of determining the pool that mined a block. – chytrik Dec 19 '19 at 22:10
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    They can and do have false self attribution. I know because I was responsible for at least one. – Anonymous Dec 19 '19 at 22:13
  • Why should someone add "Mined by ceamkyxiloo" even if the block was not mined by F2pool? Also, there is a reason why a pool should keep on changing its address? – Rick Dec 19 '19 at 22:20
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    @Rick its impossible to answer "why would someone do this?", but the point is that they can, and have. Mining is designed to be something that can be done anonymously, for hopefully obvious reasons. – chytrik Dec 20 '19 at 0:02
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    I did it because I thought it was hilarious that people keep trying to “measure decentralization” by looking at a self reported value. Nobody ever noticed, not even the pool it was falsely attributed to. – Anonymous Dec 20 '19 at 2:28

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