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I'm trying to learn more about doing multisig transactions.

The examples I've seen show the signing of the transaction with 2-of-3, or 3-of-3, where the signatures are added, essentially, at the same time, and same place.

I'm wondering how does one, using rpc or cli, perform a multisig spend from physically separate machines?

How does a signer know that there is a transaction that he/she needs to sign?

Can a 2-of-3 transaction, that initially only contains 1 signature be broadcast, then updated by the 2nd or 3rd signatory?

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I'm wondering how does one, using rpc or cli, perform a multi sig spend from physically separate machines?

It is the usually the same exact process, just doing the signing command(s) on multiple devices. The software should be able to handle when it can't fully sign and will produce as many signatures as it can for that transaction.

How does a signee know that there is a transaction that he/she needs to sign?

He has to be given the transaction to sign. If using PSBT, the transaction will usually contain an identifier for the signer that the signer can look for to know whether to sign.

Can a 2-of-3 transaction, that initially only contains 1 sig be broadcast then updated by 2nd or 3rd signatory?

No, the transaction is not fully signed so it cannot be broadcast to the network. It must be given to one of the other signers and they must sign the transaction before it can be broadcast.

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  • Thanks Andrew, this is very helpful. – Magick Aug 20 '20 at 0:32
  • I read that question as "can a partially signed be broadcast to the network". Since it's not fully signed, it confuses me that you answered "Yes.". A partially signed transaction wouldn't relay, right? Could you please elaborate the last part of your answer? I feel like you must be talking about a different broadcast mechanism than what I was thinking. – Murch Aug 20 '20 at 2:07
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    I just watched Andrews video discussing PSBT, and yes, youre right. The partially signed transaction cant be sent on the blockchain - and needs to be passed to the signers using something like email etc. – Magick Aug 20 '20 at 3:24
  • @Murch Hmm, I think I misread that sentence. – Andrew Chow Aug 20 '20 at 4:53
  • I see, thanks for the update! – Murch Aug 20 '20 at 6:50

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