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Questions tagged [quantum-computing]

Questions about potential future advancements in quantum computing and their impact on Bitcoin.

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emergence of quantum computing and its potential threat

Considering the emergence of quantum computing and its potential threat to cryptographic security, how might the Bitcoin network adapt and evolve to maintain its integrity and resilience in the face ...
Shaikh Muhammed's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

How would mining pools prevent fake hash rates from quantum computers?

This question is related to other two: quora - How do mining pools prevent fake hash rates? reddit - How do mining pools prevent fake hashrates? The answers are far from being useful. For example, One ...
R. S.'s user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
274 views

Are there any plans to make Bitcoin quantum-resistant?

There is a lot of discussion about quantum computing and how it will be able to crack wallet addresses. This could happen as early as 2025 says one source. Microsoft and other entities are working to ...
Jake Stanton's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
111 views

Is the Taproot script tree commitment quantum safe?

If an attacker in posession of a quantum computer can break the ECDLP, they can of course spend every Taproot output using the key path. However, do they also have the ability to construct a valid ...
Vojtěch Strnad's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

Is it possible to use Bitcoin Script to implement a quantum-resistant locking script that would be safe to spend from?

Stewart, I., et. al. (2018). "Committing to quantum resistance: A slow defence for Bitcoin against a fast quantum computing attack" described a method by which funds could be safely moved ...
bca-0353f40e's user avatar
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1 answer
218 views

Address Reuse and ECDSA Concern

I have a question about address reuse. Admittedly, I'm a little confused on the matter, so please bear with me if the framing of my question doesn't make much sense. Recently I started using Sparrow ...
anonpleb's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
95 views

Asumming a quantum computer gets deployed. Is it safe to prune the witness area and make blocks 1MB again?

Assuming a quantum computer gets deployed. ECDSA doesn't prove anything anymore. Can we prune the witness area to save space and turn old transactions into a proper anyone can spend?
Hcomber's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
124 views

Does key derivation make (or help to make) Bitcoin "quantum safe"?

We have these two other questions that touch on the same subject of how safe is Bitcoin from quantum computing attacks, but I believe mine is specific enough to be a separate question: What effects ...
Pedro Martins Timóteo da Costa's user avatar
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2 answers
266 views

Is Taproot the best address against quantum computers attack?

I'm looking for an address type for long term storage of bitcoin but I don't know what to choose. I'm not sure if Taproot is more secure than segwit. Another question I have about Taproot, is that if ...
Dodi Alf's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
148 views

Post-quantum preimage resistance of HASH160 addresses

It is well understood that quantum computers could make finding 256-bit hash-collisions feasible, and that they could break elliptic-curve public key encryption currently used in Bitcoin. It is also ...
bca-0353f40e's user avatar
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0 votes
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Is it possible to create a taproot address that a quantum computer can't spend via the keyspend path?

I'm wondering if there's any valid public key that is known to not have a corresponding private key that can be used as the primary taproot key. The goal would be to ensure that the address can't be ...
B T's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Why there are signature and public key pair on blocks when transaction verifying is over

I'm student studying about bitcoin and blockchain. I want to know why all blocks have signature and key pair after the transaction is over. Why I ask this, I'm studying post quantum cryptography (PQC) ...
hhhbbb's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
393 views

Taproot, potential quantum bug, and general clarification

Here seeking information. I have 2 questions marked with parens Would like some clarification pertaining to the Mark Friedenbach article: Why I'm Against Taproot The point of contention with Mark ...
Michael Tidwell's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
116 views

How would a hard fork for a new key-pair/address generation algorithm be implemented practically?

If an upcoming hard fork entails a switch to new method for key-pair/address generation, how exactly is it going to be carried out? How would all the old addresses going to change to ones that are ...
WalksB's user avatar
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1 answer
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Two threats to Bitcoin: Quantum Computing and Mining farm seizures - what new BIPs are needed before it is too late? [closed]

How resistant is bitcoin blockchain against physical attacks? Contrary to other consensus mechanisms, Bitcoin's PoW model is dependent on massive Mining Farms with tons of ASIIC hardware. These farms ...
Marieanndrasuper's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
207 views

What would a bitcoin quantum resistant address look like?

In a hypothetical future where a quantum computer is able to break the cryptography protecting the bitcoin private key, one of the solution would be to move our coins to quantum safe resistant ...
Saxtheowl's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
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Why can't Grover's algorithm be used for bitcoin mining?

Similar questions have been asked before: Can quantum computing improve Bitcoin mining? Can a Qubit Miner ASIC device be created and what would its impact be on the mining community? However, none ...
Biology nerd's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
974 views

Could Taproot create larger security risks or even hinder future protocol adjustments re Quantum threats?

I am quoting here a user named "blk014" who responded to Pieter's Taproot tweets from 24JAN. I find this user's comments very interesting and would like to ask a developer expert how much of a ...
johnsmiththelird's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
447 views

A security need for Bitcoin to fork to quantum resistant algorithm in a few years?

in just a few years I believe that quantums will exist that break asymmetric ciphers, and bitcoin is based on asymmetric ones like public-key-cryptography, correct? Symmetric algorithms are supposed ...
johnsmiththelird's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
139 views

What amount of hashrate can we estimate Google's 53 qubit Sycamore quantum computer could yield?

Could Sycamore be programmed to perform massively parallel SHA256 searching? If so, how much hashrate do you estimate this 53 qubit machine could yield? Is there enough public information to be able ...
Jose Fonseca's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
109 views

Why can't a longer key combat quantum computers?

Google's new quantum computer performed a calculation in 3.5 minutes that would have taken 10,000 years on a normal computer (so they claim: https://www.space.com/quantum-computer-milestone-supremacy....
Rick Seeger's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
146 views

Google's Sycamore processor has parallel-processed 2^53 states. Is this a threat to Bitcoin?

Today, Google's Sycamore quantum computer has been confirmed to process 53 qubits in parallel. In practical terms, for non-quantum experts, how relevant is this breakthrough in terms of secp256k1 ...
Jose Fonseca's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
244 views

How can I protect my funds in the event a quantum computer breaks the ECDLP that Bitcoin relies on?

An interesting question was posted recently, discussing the idea of hashed addresses being (not meaningfully) quantum resistant. As Andrew's answer on that question points out, paying to a hashed ...
chytrik's user avatar
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25 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why does hashing public keys not actually provide any quantum resistance?

In the discussions about taproot, it was mentioned that outputs will include the public key directly instead of hashing them. It is stated that, currently, hashing does not really provide quantum ...
Ava Chow's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Signature digital algorithm in bitcoin, to what will it change in the future?

in follow-up to the question: 85202 There, @Ugam Kamat wrote ""ECDSA is the first thing that can get vulnerable with quantum computer. signature will need to move to post quantum world much before ...
johnsmiththelird's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
260 views

Bitcoin Signatures are susceptible to quantum attacks - how exactly and with what practical impact? [duplicate]

@PieterWuille wrote in another thread: "" The hashing algorithm is probably the most quantum-resistant piece of cryptography right now in Bitcoin. Barring any specific breaks, SHA256 and RIPEMD160 ...
johnsmiththelird's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
116 views

How may bitcoins hash algorithm be secured in the future from quantum computing brute forcing?

Other threads already answer very clearly that quantum comps could easily "break" /attack bitcoins chain. Now: Are there any ideas among the bitcoin devs circulating out there, how to save bitcoin ...
johnsmiththelird's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
164 views

How single usage of bitcoin address is resistant to quantum computing _and_ replace-by-fee?

It is often said that if a bitcoin user uses addresses only once, then quantum computer cannot compromise their security since the public key is revealed only when the money are actually spent. But ...
Daniel Vartanov's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
128 views

What positive effects can Quantum Computers have on the Blockchain technology and hence Bitcoin

Quantum Computers We always fear what we do not know. This statement has been proven right throughout the history of mankind and has resulted in significant evolution, even though there was always ...
Junaid Shaikh's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
2k views

What happens to SHA256 based cryptocurrencies when encription break takes no time? [duplicate]

There is 49 qbit quantum processor already, there are predicted trends of time to facror. So what happens to SHA256 based cryptocurrencies when encription break takes no time and all transactions on ...
Blender's user avatar
  • 141
9 votes
2 answers
4k views

Are Schnorr signatures quantum-computer resistant?

Here (https://bitcoincore.org/en/2017/03/23/schnorr-signature-aggregation/) it says Schnorr replaces ECDSA, we know that ECDSA can be broken by quantum computers. Is Schnorr safe from q-computers?
MCCCS's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
1k views

IOTA quantum resistance [closed]

I've read a great deal about the impact of quantum computing on cryptocurrencies in: https://github.com/theQRL/QRL/blob/master/QRL_whitepaper.pdf What effects would a scalable Quantum Computer have ...
fiction's user avatar
  • 518
6 votes
1 answer
454 views

How does Mimblewimble's security model compare to Bitcoin's?

In addition to scaling, privacy, and scripting differences Mimblewimble also differs in its security model. How does Mimblewimble's security model compare to Bitcoin's? Specifically: How well will ...
nate's user avatar
  • 245
6 votes
2 answers
1k views

Bitcoin Blockchain in the Quantum computing era

The design and the evolution of quantum computers has been one of the "hot" topics during the last 20 years. My question is about the possible consequences of the rise of quantum computers (through ...
KonKan's user avatar
  • 193
4 votes
1 answer
360 views

Would quantum computing be able to deanonymize CoinJoin transactions?

Using the worst case scenario of this question, namely: Bitcoin ECDSA algorithm would be broken. Because quantum computers can easily decrypt the private key using the public key, anyone with a ...
dEBRUYNE's user avatar
  • 143
3 votes
1 answer
580 views

Does address-reuse make Bitcoin private keys vulnerable to quantum computing?

Though quantum computing can technically break ECDSA with enough qubits, this has not the greatest implication on btc because public keys are not known as they are protected by the hashing used to ...
tacoma's user avatar
  • 307
12 votes
1 answer
742 views

Is there a fallback plan if bitcoin's underlying cryptography is cracked?

Lets say someone started making real viable quantum computers that were affordable enough that large companies could buy one. And lets say a quantum algorithm was devised to crack the private keys of ...
B T's user avatar
  • 1,638
1 vote
2 answers
189 views

Mastercoin vs Quantum Computers [duplicate]

Assuming quantum computers become mature enough to effectively crack elliptic curve cryptography of the type used by bitcoin, is Mastercoin secure?
Assaf Shomer's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Does the block reward get halved every 4 years regardless of hardware advancements?

Is the invention of a faster computer (let's say a quantum computer) or the lack of advancements in computing power (let's say it takes a decade to make any progress greater than incremental increases ...
Gaia's user avatar
  • 453
0 votes
2 answers
2k views

Can a Qubit Miner ASIC device be created and what would its impact be on the mining community?

With mining gaining in popularity every day and the raw power of the ASIC devices increasing at a dramatic rate, I wonder what is the next big jump for miners. Qubits, or quantum bits, have already ...
Scott's user avatar
  • 822
6 votes
1 answer
4k views

Can quantum computing improve Bitcoin mining?

Would a D-Wave 2 with 512 qbits be faster than the fastest ASIC when mining bitcoins?
Jader Dias's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
3k views

How vulnerable is bitcoin to quantum algorithms? [duplicate]

Assuming that quantum computers are implemented some time in the near-ish future, how vulnerable is Bitcoin to decryption via quantum algorithms? For example, Shor's algorithm enables a quantum ...
Manishearth's user avatar
58 votes
8 answers
41k views

What effects would a scalable Quantum Computer have on Bitcoin?

A scalable quantum computer is a quantum computer that is easy to extend - adding more (q)bits of memory is not a fundamentally hard problem, and will happen. Or, alternatively, that it follows Moore'...
ripper234's user avatar
  • 26.6k