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This tag should be used for questions pertaining to private keys. Private keys are used for signing transactions and allow the holder of the private key to spend the Bitcoin associated with the address derived from the private key.

0
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Yes if only one private key has been compromised but the multisig address requires more than one co-signer sign transactions then the funds can't be stolen. You can have between 1 and 15 co-signers fo …
answered Sep 22 '17 by Abdussamad
1
vote
That's the key stretching function that adds a little bit of entropy to the seed. The mnemonic goes through that function and then the output of that goes through bip32_root() which runs it through sh …
answered Feb 7 '18 by Abdussamad
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You can always create raw transactions and sign them offline. However I think you mean a more user friendly way of doing this. The only full node software that I know of which supports offline signing …
answered Feb 2 '18 by Abdussamad
4
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Use this python script: from electrum import bitcoin format,privkey,compressed=bitcoin.deserialize_privkey("<yourprivatekeyhere>") print( bitcoin.serialize_privkey( privkey, compressed, "p2wpkh") ) …
answered Feb 3 '18 by Abdussamad
0
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Edit 2019-02-08: It has now become apparent that this problem was due to file system corruption and a bug in Electrum. The bug manifests when you create more than one wallet one after the other in a s …
answered Sep 1 '18 by Abdussamad
3
votes
Individual address private keys begin with 5,L or K. What you're calling root private keys are actually called extended private keys and they begin with ?prv where ? is either x,z,y,Y,Z. You can see e …
answered Jun 8 '20 by Abdussamad
5
votes
Use Electrum 3.1.1 and prepend "p2wpkh:" to the private key before importing or sweeping it. For example: p2wpkh:5Kkzs8XrJNAmf9VQDFeGBfaRvSByAvPK6DbDXw5BVqswWaXSG2Y
answered Mar 24 '18 by Abdussamad
8
votes
Prepend "p2wpkh-p2sh:" to the private key before importing it into Electrum. For example: p2wpkh-p2sh:5Kkzs8XrJNAmf9VQDFeGBfaRvSByAvPK6DbDXw5BVqswWaXSG2Y
answered Mar 25 '18 by Abdussamad