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Questions about the supply side of crypto-currencies including the rate and mechanisms by which coins are made available or unavailable in the economy and the affect of the money supply on the value and usefulness of currencies.

1
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The concept of a money multiplier is meaningless in an unregulated environment. The money multiplier is, by definition, a legal limit imposed on the reserves banks must have.
answered Dec 31 '13 by David Schwartz
4
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There is no such procedure. While OpenCoin could accomplish it today by changing the code to create such a thing, in the future, the procedure would be as follows: Propose some kind of change that w …
answered Apr 27 '13 by David Schwartz
4
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Fiat currencies can only exist as debt. If you have them, and they're not in your physical possession, it can only mean that someone owes them to you. This is the same way it works outside the Ripple …
answered Feb 11 '13 by David Schwartz
1
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Let's assume, for the sake of argument, this works and destroys the Bitcoin network. Everyone who held Bitcoins would be rich, since the government had to buy those Bitcoins at whatever price they de …
answered Oct 5 '13 by David Schwartz
92
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TL;DR: No. The argument is basically that hoarding will make Bitcoins so valuable that nobody will be willing to offer people enough to part with them. Does that pass the giggle test? Another way o …
answered Sep 2 '11 by David Schwartz
2
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Yes, hoarding does hurt Bitcoin. For Bitcoin to have a successful future, people need to be able to use Bitcoins as a medium of exchange. If Bitcoin succeeds, in the far future you won't need to exch …
answered Dec 29 '11 by David Schwartz
6
votes
XRP are internally represented as an integer number of millionths of a ripple. No term has yet been accepted for naming these units, but some people have (I think jokingly) referred to them as "Jeds". …
answered Feb 11 '13 by David Schwartz
2
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So I hope that I'm wrong and that there is in fact a defense built into the protocol. Why do you need a defense against people having what they want? If people prefer such a system to Bitcoin, th …
answered Apr 1 '13 by David Schwartz
5
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Currently, only three-letter currencies that exist as IOUs can be created as a custom currency. And if someone else uses that same three-letter identifier for something else, each account can only tra …
answered Feb 11 '13 by David Schwartz
4
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Basically, yes. But it doesn't have any dramatic effect and it's almost certainly over by now. When Bitcoin was first released, it was not generally known that it was possible to mine efficiently usi …
answered Apr 8 '13 by David Schwartz
6
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The new FinCEN regulations are quite clear that the term "create" includes currencies that people "obtain by their own computing or manufacturing effort". A final type of convertible virtual curre …
answered Mar 22 '13 by David Schwartz
4
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This is possible through the use of a multiplier. For example, you could add it to Bitcoin as follows: You add a "currency multiplier" and "next currency multiplier" to the block header. All Bitcoin …
answered Dec 13 '13 by David Schwartz