9

Are there any others that are particularly effective? Yes, if you know what wallet was used and if its transactions have distinguishing features. For example, multisig wallets usually use p2sh change, but the recipient rarely uses p2sh, which allows to determine the correct change output with high probability. Data-Driven De-Anonymization in Bitcoin ...


7

You're missing the main point: when a selfish miner finds a new block, he keeps it private, does not broadcast it to the network, and starts mining on top of that privately. The rest of the network is still mining on a block that was actually already found, but not broadcast. When the rest of the network finally finds this block, the selfish miner ...


5

To answer your direct question, transactions will be delayed by the round-trip time light takes to get to the nearest mining community. With low-earth orbit, this really shouldn't make much of a difference. That said, the deeper problem once space travel is wide-spread is that the current protocol is inherently space-time centralized. This is because the ...


5

Biggest problem facing spaceborne bitcoin is communications latency. Consider possible Mars colony. Light speed imposes delay, 4 to 24 minutes. Bad enough this is. If miners on both Earth and Mars, each comes up with new block, possibly extends blockchain twice more, before signal from other crosses distance. Means very long transaction confirmation ...


5

What use is a transaction that is never relayed? None, unless it is generated by the same person who mines it into a block. But it is not the case that non-standard transactions are never relayed. There are nodes that relay non-standard transactions and miners who include them. How did the transaction make it into a block in the first place if it cannot ...


5

Here's the Research article on the Bitcoin wiki: http://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Research You might find some of the authors in the list have related research that is not directly related to Bitcoin so is absent from that list.


5

Bitcoin by nature would be a fantastic currency for interplanetary travel, if mankind every reaches that stage. Advantages No physical medium to be transported Relatively low bandwidth to conduct a transaction Considerations to address bitcoin is highly reliant on having accurate system time A transaction would need to be based on Earth's UTC ...


4

Only a problem that meets a number of very specific requirements can possibly be used. The work must be much easier to verify than to perform. The work must be inseparable from the block it is attached to. The work must not require a central authority to assign it. And so on. I dont see why such a problem cant also be useful. Say the network was trying to ...


4

How would solving these problems secure the network? Miners are rewarded for the proof of work they do because the specific proof of work they do -- hashing block headers -- in fact secures the system. Solving other problems doesn't secure the currency. If you want to pay people for doing work, you certainly can. But don't at all confuse it with the proof-of-...


4

https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Vocabulary


4

The report is not heavily disputed. In the hours following the paper's release, several developers are discussing solutions: http://www.mail-archive.com/bitcoin-development@lists.sourceforge.net/msg03128.html and http://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=324413.0 There has not been any evidence that such an attack is imminent or likely even. And remember,...


4

Hashcash is one of the many anti-spam techniques used today, which is essentially a proof-of-work system designed to limit not only email spam but also denial-of-service attacks. A similar proof-of-work methodology is being used in bitcoin for block generation. With an average of 150 billion e-mails sent out on a daily basis I cannot see how this could be ...


3

I haven't read any papers trying to analyze the amount of unspent outputs. More often, people are interested in the distribution of address' balances. This could be interesting because it reflects how evenly distributed bitcoin is. I did find this article: http://www.coindesk.com/what-block-chain-analysis-tells-bitcoin/, which seems like it might be of ...


3

Note that there is a new and better paper about this topic by Aviv Zohar et al. - http://arxiv.org/pdf/1507.06183v1.pdf. None of the solutions suggested have been implemented yet. The attack is significant enough that some solution will need to be found, but that's up to researchers, not developers.


3

Not that I know of. Opencoin is still playing around with the protocol, so there probably won't be a white paper until they open source it.


3

See http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IavQ-Wc8S1U Clemens Cap of Uni Rostock explains the Electronic Bitcoin wallet device he's working on. It's based on adafruit microtouch device. This is a small takeout of Clemens' talk at the Bitcoin Conference in Prague 2011


3

I know of one researcher off hand who has worked in this area, Adam Hayes. You can find his papers on the subject at: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2648366 http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org/econ/2015/NSSR_WP_052015.pdf You could also look around on http://arxiv.org/. Just searching for 'bitcoin price', I found: http://arxiv.org/...


3

b-money proposes to pay for money minting by means of proof-of-work. The minted money then has the value of the expended computational power. For value transfers it either relied on a synchronous unjammable channel and arbitration, or on a set of trusted servers that had to be regularly audited by the other network participants. In other words, b-money used ...


2

The length of a merkle tree is the sum of a series starting with the number of leaves, halving (rounded up) on every step and ending with 1. Here is the algorithm for calculating the length of a merkle tree from the number of leaves in JavaScript. function getMerkleLength(leafCount) { // Input must be a positive integer or zero leafCount = Math.abs(...


2

The interesting thing about that paper is that, if I understood correctly, it doesn't require pools to collude in order to attempt the "selfish miner" strategy - any pool with more than 25% of the total hash power could do it solo - right now there are pools which could do it. And with just slightly more than 33% of total hash power, they could make their ...


2

Bitcoin, as it works now should work fine in low-earth orbits. I'm pretty sure that anyone currently in space has sufficient internet access and computing resources to view the network, post transactions, and probably even mine. But that's boring... Beyond low-earth orbits, say more than 5 light-minutes* out, I wouldn't recommend mining. There is a limit to ...


2

I think that http://bitcoinacademic.wordpress.com could be able to help. There is a wide collection of academic research in many fields. However, you are right, there are not that many peer reviewed journal articles out there, but I do think some of this research is valuable and provides interesting insights.


2

Currently, it seems, most of Bitcoin-related published research are of technical and legal nature (according to Google Scholar, Mendeley, Bitcoin Wiki). While there is some economical analysis performed by community (wiki, this question), I haven't managed to find any papers in peer-reviewed journals. This discission on Quora explains some of possible ...


2

Try looking around on http://archive.ripple-project.org/, in particular: http://archive.ripple-project.org/Main/Papers Note, that site refers to the original Ripple project and implementations of it such as RipplePay and Villages. Ripple.com is the new distributed implementation of the Ripple project and although not discussed at that site, supported by the ...


2

Selfish mining is probably one of the most addressed issues that was theorized by a group at Cornell university. I find this interesting, because rather than being a technical issue such as transaction malleability, it is more of a conceptual issue with how Bitcoin and its consensus system works. That should get you started and give you some food for ...


2

Is the attack really practical? Eh... maybe. The whitepaper you linked makes two assumptions, and it's not clear how well those hold up in practice. It costs nothing (or close to nothing compared to mining pool revenue) to run a sybil attack. From the paper: Because selfish mining is reactive, and it springs into action only after the honest nodes ...


2

There is none that I'm aware of, but technically speaking, the blockchain and the transaction hash would suffice to find it. It might be nice to add the block height number as well. Something like: Tx 35779d11b2c5aedc1ada50aaa33aafb53ccc07dae71e6d18a35a0ccb872a0efa, Bitcoin Block 342508 Would work as a citation.


2

The balance is calculated from the UTXO set where unspent outputs belong to the address in question. Most block explorers will enable the transaction index, parse the historical and live data, and dump it into a database that runs on top of bitcoin to track additional statistics. As you can imagine this requires a lot more disk storage, but it makes things ...


2

You could in theory build an ASIC to brute force private keys of any cryptographic scheme, like EC or RSA. But ASICs only give linear improvements. That means that they 'accelerate' some search only by a constant factor, like 2, 3 or 100. Even if your ASIC does something a million times faster than a normal CPU, it's still a linear improvement. If ...


1

Most Bitcoin thefts occurs due to user careless and ignorance, like not using two-factor authentication and sharing email and password across questionable websites. The risk of theft can be easily reduced by taking the basic security measurements which you should follow in any case when you are dealing with Internet. Here are some things you should include ...


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