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0

I don't see any arguments in https://github.com/spesmilo/electrum/blob/b2be29b508deb310631cacfb51bb1561bce75ff9/electrum/commands.py#L795 to specify the address type similar to address_type used in Bitcoin Core's getnewaddress As sipa also mentioned in the comments, "bc1" prefix is used for segwit addresses I think Electrum uses the default ...


3

Addresses don't get registered anywhere. You can create as many as you want without having impact on any other network participant. Addresses only get tracked by others once funds get sent to them. Needing to tie up funds for each address suffices to curb the proposed attack.


1

Private keys Old wallets used one private key generated randomly by the wallet when first run. In modern "Hierarchical Deterministic" (HD) wallets. One private key is generated either randomly or derived from a phrase called a seed-phrase or recovery-phrase which itself is generated from a random number. Then many other private keys are generated ...


1

Private keys are 256-bit numbers. The first "HEX" you list has 64 characters, which corresponds to 256 bit, while the other two have 66 characters. Since all three share the same first 64 characters, I surmise that the library you're using simply drops the additional data beyond the first 256 bit.


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A private key is an integer k in the range of (0, 2256]. The public key K is the corresponding elliptic curve point on secp256k1: K = k×G, where G is the base point or generator of secp256k1. A Pay to Public Key Hash (P2PKH) address is derived from the public key by first applying a SHA256d hash and then a RIPEMD-160 hash. The address is then encoded using ...


2

Using Elliptical Curve Digital Signature Algorithm (ECDSA), the private key is used to generate the public key, a secure hash function is then applied to the public key and a checksum appended to produce a Base58 formatted bitcoin address. A private key collision is theoretically possible, but practically impossible due to the sheer number of them available ...


3

Both "1LoVG.." and the other one are valid legacy (1...) addresses made using the same private key. They are different since one of them uses the compressed public key (you might want to look this up) while 1GAehh7 uses the uncompressed public key. Always use the same compress-format for an address, and it's advisable to create new addresses in ...


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