5

Addresses do not exist at the protocol level. You'll pay exactly the same fee whether you used the same or different addresses to withdraw. What matters is that there are many outputs you have to spend; whether those are assigned to the same addresses or distinct ones is a human abstraction - for the protocol it makes no difference. To explain, it's ...


3

Yes, in your example the sender assigned some funds to the same output script that they just spent coins from. Address reuse is permitted, but should be avoided as it unnecessarily reveals common authorship of transactions. Funds are not actually accumulated on addresses but each output is tracked separately in the form of unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs)....


3

Do the instructions to not reuse an address include change? That is, should I generate a new key pair for any transaction that needs to receive change, and then manually specify my change be sent to the newly generated address? Wallet software will do this automatically for you. Whenever change is created, the wallet will construct a new keypair, compute ...


3

It sounds like you have rediscovered a mechanism called child pays for parent. Generally, no, two independent transactions could get included in any order even when they were sent from the same wallet or involve the same address. There is no efficiency benefit to reusing addresses, in fact it has significant downsides especially for privacy.—Miners will ...


3

I think these is only one answer to this question: ask whomever gave you the xpub. Xpubs define series of keys, but there isn't any implicit contract or understanding about how that should be converted into addresses. The specific index positions to use is one question, but there are others, like what type of address/script to use (P2PKH, P2WPKH, ...). All ...


2

This is mostly about privacy Because they don't care about their privacy Because they don't care about their clients/customers/friends' privacy Because they want to keep their code simple Because they don't want to keep a database of their addresses Because their identity is already obvious: This is the case for exchange wallets Because multisig ...


2

Most wallets have indeed only one main secret, but they use it to generate many different addresses. When you receive a payment in Bitcoin, the sender locks up funds with a locking script that can only be spent using your private key. The locking scripts are deterministically derived from your public key and visible to all other users on the network. If you ...


2

BitPay is literally the worst choice you can make for Bitcoin payment processing. BitPay routinely requires your paying users to provide sensitive document scans even for the smallest amounts like $10 - killing payment conversion, is very outdated technology wise (always has been), and was Bitcoin explicit enemy in the past (now kind of neutral). If you ...


2

Bitpay is easy to use but certainly has many limitations at least on the merchant side. In my country it has even suspended the bitcoin settlement service altogether. If your company is interested in investing a bit on the cryptopayment side, maybe can be a more wise approach building your own infrastructure, maintaining a BTCPay server and a Bitcoin full ...


2

Does following the address reuse recommendation render the concept of coin selection useless? No, it does not. It seems like the main misconception is that using an address multiple times creates fewer UTXOs than using multiple addresses for each payment. However they are the exact same. If you receive 5 payments to a single address, you will have 5 UTXOs. ...


1

There really isn't ever a reason to have a static bitcoin address, as @Murch mentioned in the comments, doing so has very real downsides, and no real upside. That said, your wallet will (and should) present you with a new address for each and every payment you receive, however, any past address your wallet has presented to you will continue to work to ...


1

A wallet can have many addreses not just one. Each of those addresses lasts forever and never changes. You can receive as many transactions as you want to any address that you pick. Re-using one address means a loss of privacy (other people can see transactions to that address) - this is why your wallet creates a new address every time you click the address ...


1

The string of characters you sent your btc to is called a bitcoin address. You should use a new one every time you receive funds. This is important for your privacy, and the privacy of those you transact with. The blockchains is a public database, if you just used one address repeatedly, then every person that paid you would be effectively able to see your ...


1

Are there known reasons or types of users who intentionally choose not to follow the advice to use new change addresses? Say you perform a lot of transactions but still want to have some mechanism for your heirs to get to your bitcoin should you die. And say that you don't do anything you have any need to keep secret. In this case, it makes a lot of sense ...


1

Is there a good technique to be able to spend these UTXO's without compromising privacy? Never consolidate UTXOs after coinjoin. Spend and use them separately. Use payjoin. Avoid sending directly to any KYC exchange. Bisq is one of the DEX which can be used. Never share them on social media or any public groups which could result in associating your ...


1

bitcoin core version 0.20.0 has: bitcoin-cli setlabel 16ga2uqnF1NqpAuQeeg7sTCAdtDUwDyJav brainwallets


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