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6

Having investigated this following @MCCCS answer, the following is information about the addresses provided by Blockhair support: In fact, there are no addresses on the Bitcoin blockchain. There are only scripts, some of them are standard and can be converted to a Bitcoin address, some of them can’t — like nulldata (OP_RETURN) outputs, nonstandard, and bare ...


3

The wiki says that A Bitcoin address is an identifier of 26-35 alphanumeric characters. This information is now outdated but it was true at the time this question was asked look at morsecoder's answer. With the introduction of Bech32 type addresses in 2017, the minimum and maximum length of a Bitcoin address have changed. According to BIP 173: [Segwit] ...


2

Those are invalid addresses that don't belong to any cryptocurrency. You should file a bug report at https://github.com/Blockchair/Blockchair.Support/issues since those might even be their database secrets. Those are of 16 bytes. My initial guess about their format would be SHA-1, but Bitcoin does not use SHA-1. Probably it's related to their database. For ...


2

Electrum servers are simply not compatible with Bitcoin Core on a development or operational level. They require a vast amount of indexes created which the node does not have, and must be created by an external tool. With the state of the art electrs Electrum server, it needs upwards of a day of time to create these indexes, and more than 50GB of additional ...


2

Short answer: check out BTCPay, it does what you ask. You don't have to create your own server to use it, you can just create an account on an existing instance, for example this one should be fine to being with. Long answer: you're right when you say that one private key generates one address, but Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) wallets are made to solve ...


2

There are many types of Bitcoin addresses. Your example specifies (legacy) pay-to-pubkey-hash (P2PKH) address defined by Base58 check encoding and Wallet Import Format (WIF) which is also specified by base58 check Base58 encoding treats the entire input payload as a big-endian big integer. Consider these alternate examples: Input value: bc in ASCII: 0x62 ...


1

A few exchanges publicize their hot and cold wallets, but currently, as far as I'm aware, no exchange publishes a full list. This may change as FATF's Recommendation 16 adoption grows, but may still be limited to closed access networks among exchanges. Beyond that, for most services, it is not very hard to determine if a used address belongs to an exchange - ...


1

I think the preferred technique to use 'bitcoin core as a wallet backend' is through block filters, like the new compact block filters (an improvement over bloom filters). The protocol is known as Neutrino and lowers the CPU and storage requirements for your bitcoin core node (an electrumx database takes around 50 GB right now). To create these filters in ...


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NOTE: This applies only to LEGACY ADDRESSES that start with a "1". Addresses starting with "3" have 0x0014 appended to the beginning and are Base58Check encoded, while addresses starting with "bc1q" have 0x0014 appended to the beginning but are encoded with Bech32 Encoding. You will get Hex/binary after decoding from Base58Check....


1

I believe there are two key decisions to be made, for your case, and essentially the second would depend on the first that is: Would your customer want control over their own funds? If so, a private/public key(s) is in order. If they don't then you can decide if you want to have separate private keys for each client or not. What it's important in any case is ...


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