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1

How do they do that? See https://www.walletexplorer.com/info What is on this site? WalletExplorer.com is Bitcoin blockchain explorer, with two additional features: it merges addresses together, if WalletExplorer thinks that they are part of the same wallet wallet can have name How wallets are computed? When are addresses merged together? Just a basic ...


0

A new bitcoin user "U" first generates a private key. He can compute several public keys from this private key. The kind of private key you are referring to is an extended private key which is described in the Bitcoin Improvement Proposal 0032 (BIP32) or, like RedGrittyBrick explained, what powers HD wallets. An extended private key contains only ...


2

A modern Bitcoin wallet program can generate many private-keys, each private-key has a public-key. For the most common transaction types, a Bitcoin-address is derived from the public-key. As you say it is normal to generate a new address (i.e. a new set of keys) for each transaction. This is because all the transaction data is public knowledge - it is in the ...


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You can try walletexplorer. Or start compiling this list yourself, there is a ton of false data there. So if you are looking for quantity, I'd suggest walletexplorer, for quality you have to do attribute these services on your own.


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The transaction in which 4 BTC was sent to 33ox8sprJPoz7C3doQmi3ArKqkfbPErfKy on 2017-07-01 has 3 inputs: 1CgAUumauUWVXmZ9ghvCuiR4bJCF2WoGA5 1Q96eeg7vf1M66VsYYwSnNRhwDeve96sGj 149TNv5v3RCeNM7XQarx8aHSRBx8iDQbvK Most probably all belong to the same user and 13uTxEJsa55V9kEpfX8pAspBwWAmanjBQQ was change address associated in this transaction which also ...


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No, and in fact, deleting a file is not destructive enough. File deletion typically does not actually delete the file. Filesystems will just mark a file as deleted and allow it to be overwritten. If the file does not end up overwritten, it can be recovered from the drive using some forensic tools. Furthermore, the way that the hard drive itself writes data ...


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I have found the answer thanks to modood/btckeygen. Here is the relevant code extracted from the repo. witnessProg := btcutil.Hash160(pubkey.SerializeCompressed()) addressWitnessPubKeyHash, err := btcutil.NewAddressWitnessPubKeyHash(witnessProg, chainParams) if err != nil { panic(err) } address := addressWitnessPubKeyHash.EncodeAddress()


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As an answer didn't appear to be forthcoming, I did my own research in order to address this question. Based on the information provided by the Bitcoin Wiki on Bech32 adoption, I surmised the following information. All mainstream software wallets support sending to Bech32. All mainstream hardware wallets support sending to Bech32 (either directly or via ...


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If you look closely, you'll notice that BIP 32 and BIP 44 actually have the same root key and it begins with xprv. Then BIP 49 and BIP 141 also have the same root key and it begins with yprv. BIP 84 has a root key that's different from the others that begins with zprv. Now if you were to take all of those root keys and Base 58 decode them, you'll find that ...


4

Answering this question requires first defining what an address means. Historically (before BIP16 activated in 2012) an address was a synonym with a "public key identifier", as there were no addresses for multisig constructions or anything like that. Under this interpretation, pay-to-pubkey or pay-to-pubkey-hash outputs would be seen as having the ...


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The second output you are showing is using the pay to pubkey output script. Pay to pubkey (P2PK) eponymously locks funds to a public key. The corresponding input script only needs to provide a signature by the corresponding private key to spend the funds. The P2PK fell out of disuse for everything except mining outputs early on, and there never was a ...


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