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[^13][a-km-zA-HJ-NP-Z1-9]{25,34}$. ... I removed the ^ and $ from the ends after when I realized that there is no reason to think it's at the beginning or end of a line ... As you noted, the trailing dollar sign ($) anchors the search expression to an end-of-line (e.g. LF on Linux) - you probably do not want to do that. However the [^13] does not ...


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What you can spend, and what you can send to depends on the wallet software and nothing else. There are no inherent restrictions on any combination. In case someone uses old software, they may not be able to send to bech32 addresses. But they'll get an error that the software doesn't recognize the address; no funds will be lost.


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Yes, to get addresses from scriptPubKeys, you will need to do a pattern match. There are only a small number of address types each with their own fixed scriptPubKey pattern. Keep in mind that not all scriptPubKeys map to an address so you will find scriptPubKeys that have no address and you will need to handle those. Bitcoin Core has a pattern matcher for ...


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Yes, every Bitcoin fork and others: Litecoin, Zcash, Dash, Decred, Dogecoin, Zcoin, Monero (~?), etc. You are looking for UTXO-based blockchains. The ones which you describe are account-based blockchains. I found this article that might help you under the limitations behind each design source: here.


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Many wallet software obfuscate the information about payment and change address in order to protect the privacy of the user. When you see block explorer websites showing addresses in the outputs as change addresses, they are merely guessing as there is no sure shot way of knowing. Some of the techniques used to identify change addresses are below. I have ...


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The account API has been deprecated for a while, and was completely removed in Bitcoin Core 0.18.0. You should be using the new mutliwallet API, or handling account based labelling externally.


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These are not public keys. Not everything that is 33 bytes is a public key. In this case, it is a 32 byte hash. The first byte indicates that the next 32 bytes are to be pushed to the stack. So the result is that the actual data in this scriptPubKey is a 32 byte string. In this case, this particular transaction is a coinbase transaction in a block mined by ...


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These are not public keys, they are data or bitcoin script fragments. For example, the address s-38f26094a4e3514933fc2bf56a1f2f26 is actually the bitcoin script: OP_IFDUP OP_IF OP_2SWAP OP_VERIFY OP_2OVER OP_DEPTH Addresses are a human construct, and only certain well defined bitcoin scripts (p2pk, p2pkh, p2sh, p2wpkh, p2wsh) are convertable to addresses. ...


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How do I find out where a bitcoin address is from? You can't find a person, organisation or place from a Bitcoin address alone. A Bitcoin address isn't really an address in the normal sense. It doesn't label a place or person or anything else in the real world. Really its just a reference number produced from a secret number by a mathematical function. You ...


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If you do not remember making this transaction, your keys or devices may have been compromised. It is not possible to determine who or what entity holds the private keys to a bitcoin address - bitcoin is anonymous by design. Although there are techniques to link addresses to known parties such as exchanges, they are rarely 100% accurate, and usually cost ...


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You can't find the address from the scriptSig or input in general, because you don't know what the output was. Your question makes the assumption that every output contains a (common, but not only) P2PKH script. If you would know the output being spent was a pay-to-pubkey-hash scriptPubKey, which is spent by revealing the full public key and a signature ...


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