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4

In addition to the rationale given in BIP 341, I know of two arguments for not supporting P2SH-wrapped taproot outputs: backwards-compatibility: P2SH-wrapped segwit outputs were included in BIP 141 as a way to allow unupgraded wallets to send outputs to upgraded segwit wallets[0]. Segwit activation happened around 4 years ago, and almost all wallets/...


2

Base58 addresses are case sensitive. With the correct capitalization, the address resolves fine: https://blockchain.com/btc/address/1111111111111111111114oLvT2. Addresses do not get any confirmations. Confirmations pertain to specific transactions not addresses. When a transaction is included in a block that constitutes the transaction's first confirmation. ...


1

There are currently 3 address types defined in Bitcoin: The satoshi-era P2PKH format, which is Base58 encoding of (1 byte version prefix) + (20 bytes pubkeyhash) + (4 bytes checksum). The checksum is the first 4 bytes of the double-SHA256 hash of the 21 bytes that precede it. The version number is 0 for mainnet; it's easy to find lists of prefixes for other ...


2

Warning: I don't know your use case, but in general I strongly recommend against ever giving anyone a private key. Even if in this situation they trust you enough, it is bad practice, and without good understanding I believe the risk of making people comfortable with the idea of sharing private keys likely has far worse negative than positive effects. ...


2

This is a BIP173 native segwit address. If you unselect the "Generate native segwit (Bech32) address" checkbox in bitcoin-qt, you'll get a P2SH 3xxx address instead. Most senders these days support sending the BIP173 addresses though, which are cheaper for you to use. The GUI no longer supports creation of legacy 1xxx addresses by default. You can ...


3

Addresses do not exist on-chain. In fact, they don't exist at the protocol level at all, but are a human representation of the "script" language that is used internally. Bitcoin Cash uses a different human-readable representation for the same scripts. Transactions have outputs, and every output is "locked" by a script that specifies the ...


2

It's not possible, practically speaking. A P2PKH Bitcoin address is computed as RIPEMD160(SHA256(publickey)). Since public keys are unique, to find another keypair that results in the same address, you're essentially trying to find a hash collision on SHA256 or RIPEMD160, which is extremely difficult. The most "efficient" way to find such a ...


0

Use signmessagewithprivkey for non legacy addresses.


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