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12

Electrum is easier. Armory is harder. Electrum lean towards minimalism. Armory is aimed at power users. Even though you asked about offline wallets you will likely want to maintain a watch only version of your wallet on your online system to be able to see the current balance, create unsigned transactions and give out addresses to people who want to send ...


11

This is how you obtain the private key for an Armory wallet: In Armory-Qt, click on Wallet Properties (or in the newer versions, double click on your wallet to open your Wallet Properties), then click Backup this wallet>See other backup options>Export Key Lists then click the button Export Key Lists. Enter your passphrase and Armory will show your wallet's ...


6

You can't transfer the wallet, per se, but you can transfer the private keys. Here's how to do it: Run armory in offline mode (simply run armory --offline) Click on your wallet and click "Backup This Wallet" and enter the password. Select "Export Key Lists" and click the button at the bottom Check "Private Key (Plain Base58)" from the checklist and nothing ...


5

It is hard, if not impossible, to do so when you only have the addresses. Most clients that support multiple deterministic addresses for a wallet, make sure it is impossible to know that two or more addresses are linked together. They usually use a random value as the starting seed and another random value to chain consequent new addresses. Also keep in ...


5

Yes to both questions. You only need a wallet connected to the internet to remove coins from your account, not to add new ones to it. A paper wallet can be used with any bitcoin wallet application.


5

I don't know if this is the recommended way, but I did this by using the Send Nxt API call on an offline computer, storing the transaction bytes, and broadcasting the transaction from an online computer by using the Broadcast Transaction API call.


5

Armory (in online mode) uses a full node. Full nodes relay transactions for other programs on the Bitcoin network, so by running Armory on Tor, you help other people send their transactions with possibly-improved privacy. Sending your own transactions through Tor with Armory can help prevent anyone from associating your IP address with your transaction, ...


5

Yes, you can and should transfer your bitcoin to a wallet you control after purchasing them from a web-based wallet. Never leave a substantial amount of your bitcoin on an exchange or a web wallet. Coinbase is a company that runs both an bitcoin wallet service and an exchange for purchasing and selling bitcoin for USD. Armory is a wallet that you run ...


4

In Armory: Select "Wallet Properties". Select "Backup This Wallet". Select "See Other Backup Options". Select "Export Key List". Select "Omit spaces in key data". The important string is the PrivBase58 for every bitcoin address. It is the private key of this address encoded in base58 (encoded not encrypted), which is the (only?) format Electrum accepts when ...


4

Yes, this is possible. However, since Bob (actually, in cryptography, usually Eve, the attacker) has, apparently, got access to Alice's computer, he/she could also replace the Bitcoin application with one that does the same thing. The purpose of this procedure is to protect Alice's existing bitcoin. It does not do other things.


4

No, in general wallets are just tools to manage bitcoins already in your possession. The only exception I can think of is Mycelium, which includes a functionality to find buyers and sellers nearby. To find out how to get bitcoins, check out How do you obtain bitcoins?.


4

Here it is step-by-step Run armory in offline mode (simply run armory --offline) Import the wallet into armory if you haven't already. (Import wallet, etc) (you probably don't need to do this if you have it on USB, just run that instance) Click on the wallet and click "Backup This Wallet" and enter the password. Select "Export Key Lists" and click the ...


3

We just release version 0.90-beta, which finally solves this issue. Armory does not need to rescan the blockchain anymore unless you import new private keys, or Armory experiences an unclean shutdown. With the exception of the first-time startup (to build the new databases), Armory should get into online mode within 10 seconds of Bitcoin-Qt/bitcoind ...


3

Most alternative wallets give you the possibility of exporting the private keys. Private keys can be imported in almost every other wallet. In the case of Armory, the root key and chain code are used to generate a whole chain of private keys. You can ask for new addresses as you like inside your wallet, and by backing up only these two keys, you can recover ...


3

If your settings are correct, try restarting Armory, and let it run for a few minutes. I had the same concern thinking that Armory was redownloading the blockchain, but it was actually reading from the harddrive (Listen to the harddrive). After roughly 10 minutes, the block synchronisation went from 0% very quickly to 100%, then the status changed to "...


3

By default, Armory will check 100 addresses, but this can be changed with --keypool command-line option.


3

Re: Bitcoin-QT Core Your balance showing in BTC may not be the actual amount; is the Blockchain fully synchronised? Your BTC may be spread over several private keys ie addresses in your dat wallet The floating point value may be being rounded to an integer (ie 0.000297 may show up as 0.0003) I'd go about it like this: Open options under BitcoinQT ...


3

Ok, I've successfully transferred my .000047 BTC to my other wallet using the Bitcoin Core client. Aussie's information was pretty much critical to me figuring out how to do it. Basically, I sent myself a significant amount of bitcoins, waited a couple days, then transferred everything back to my other wallet. Because it requires the use of sending bitcoins ...


3

You can just import the backup on another computer with armory installed. It's not dependent on the computer it was created on. Remember: The coins don't actually reside on your computer - The public ledger called "blockchain" holds the amount you own. You rather hold the private key in your wallet app, that allows you to sign transactions and thus send ...


3

Try searching the address at blockchain.info with the following link https://blockchain.info/address/<your_addres_here> It will give the current balance of that address, the transactions it was involved. Just in case if your bitcoins were transferred somewhere you would know.


3

No, you'll need to make space for a full copy of the blockchain somewhere. AFAIK, Armory rescans the blockchain in order to build its own database only after Bitcoin Core has fully synchronized. Therefore, Armory needs access to a full copy of the blockchain which is currently about 118GiB. Armory's database itself then will take more than 20GiB additionally....


3

This error means that the background database process, ArmoryDB, is still running. Just use sudo killall -9 ArmoryDB to kill all instances of this process and start Armory again. It's fine to use -9 as ArmoryDB is good enough to handle a SIGKILL signal; I have done this many times myself.


3

https://bitcoinarmory.com is no longer Armory's official website. The official website is actually https://btcarmory.com. bitcoinarmory.com still hosts the new binaries, but they are only a mirror and everything else on the site is outdated. Since Armory's development changed a few years ago, the actual release signing key is 4922589A as that is the new ...


3

No. Armory requires you to download the entire blockchain. You cannot use pruning either as Armory requires the entire blockchain to be present in order for it to work properly.


3

Short answer, you need Armory to open an Armory paper wallet. I use Armory and it does not fill me with confidence. I set one up and it was taking forever to sync with the blockchain. I think it actually crashed. However I had bought some BitCoin which was in there somewhere but not showing. I made a paper backup and formatted the hard drive because the PC ...


2

Electrum lets you manage offline wallets and still safely spend from an online computer. You don't even need to use an insecure USB key, you can use webcams to make the computers talk to each other. See these instructions for more information http://electrum.org/tutorials.html#offline-mpk


2

The output is fine. The key fingerprint is the same. Alan merely has several uid records in this key. See for yourself: $ gpg --list-key 98832223 pub 4096R/98832223 2012-02-28 uid Alan C. Reiner (Offline Signing Key) <alan@bitcoinarmory.com> uid Alan C. Reiner (Armory Signing Key) <etotheipi@gmail.com> uid ...


2

In your install directory, you should have armoryd.py. Once you run python armoryd.py then you have a daemon. Now you can run python armoryd.py help to get a list of commands like this (which can then be run with python armoryd.py <command>): { "backupwallet": { "Description": "Back up the current wallet to a file at a given location. The ...


2

Armory by default doesnt run Bitcoin-qt, it runs Bitcoind. Since armory installs the entire Bitcoin reference client by default, Bitcoin-qt will be present regardless (you can try to delete it, though): Bitcoin-Qt is the “Graphical User Interface” around the core Bitcoin protocol that is run by the majority of nodes on the network. ”bitcoind” is the ...


2

I have not tried it myself, but Peter Todd has a python script called dust-b-gone.py https://github.com/petertodd/dust-b-gone


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