Hot answers tagged

14

I started implementing BIP32 for the reference client myself, but as there were more urgent matters to deal with, I have temporarily stopped working on it. I certainly plan to complete this, but I can't give any target date or version right now. As far as I know from Alan Reiner (Armory's developer), he plans to switch to BIP32 as soon as the reference ...


11

Electrum is easier. Armory is harder. Electrum lean towards minimalism. Armory is aimed at power users. Even though you asked about offline wallets you will likely want to maintain a watch only version of your wallet on your online system to be able to see the current balance, create unsigned transactions and give out addresses to people who want to send ...


11

ECDSA can be thought of as a special form of mathematics where division is, for all practical purposes, impossible. Public keys are formed from private keys by multiplication -- the public key is multiplied by the generator G. Because of the properties of multiplication, new public keys can be generated by an entity that doesn't know the corresponding ...


10

This is how you obtain the private key for an Armory wallet: In Armory-Qt, click on Wallet Properties (or in the newer versions, double click on your wallet to open your Wallet Properties), then click Backup this wallet>See other backup options>Export Key Lists then click the button Export Key Lists. Enter your passphrase and Armory will show your wallet's ...


8

Yes you can, but you have to switch to "Expert" usermode from the main window. After you do, the "Send Bitcoins" window will have an option for customizing the change address. You can click on the addressbook and select any address in any wallet. Or really put in any address you want. Just remember that you are compromising your privacy by reusing ...


5

Yes to both questions. You only need a wallet connected to the internet to remove coins from your account, not to add new ones to it. A paper wallet can be used with any bitcoin wallet application.


5

It's currently not possible with Armory. Here is the issue for the feature request. The main developer of Armory is currently preparing a big change to the whole backbone of the client. The new backbone should make this possible. etotheipi told me this will be possible with the new wallets format. (comment on issue)


5

It is hard, if not impossible, to do so when you only have the addresses. Most clients that support multiple deterministic addresses for a wallet, make sure it is impossible to know that two or more addresses are linked together. They usually use a random value as the starting seed and another random value to chain consequent new addresses. Also keep in ...


5

For MultiBit you could use the command line utility called WalletTool that Mike Hearn wrote. You can use it to create bitcoinj wallets (which is what MultiBit uses). There is a description of it here: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=43616.msg1451177#msg1451177 You could wrap calls to it in your favourite scripting tool fairly easily I imagine.


5

You need to use connect in your configuration file, rpc_connect is something different, it means that your client delegates its commands to another bitcoind. If one client connects normally and other clients connect to it using connect = ip.of.main.client it will work the way you want it to. Conversely you can prevent a node from connecting to anything by ...


5

I don't know if this is the recommended way, but I did this by using the Send Nxt API call on an offline computer, storing the transaction bytes, and broadcasting the transaction from an online computer by using the Broadcast Transaction API call.


5

Armory (in online mode) uses a full node. Full nodes relay transactions for other programs on the Bitcoin network, so by running Armory on Tor, you help other people send their transactions with possibly-improved privacy. Sending your own transactions through Tor with Armory can help prevent anyone from associating your IP address with your transaction, ...


5

You can't transfer the wallet, per se, but you can transfer the private keys. Here's how to do it: Run armory in offline mode (simply run armory --offline) Click on your wallet and click "Backup This Wallet" and enter the password. Select "Export Key Lists" and click the button at the bottom Check "Private Key (Plain Base58)" from the checklist and nothing ...


4

If the coins it is using have a lot of confirmations, the less likely a fee is going to be needed. In the instance reported here, when the payment was sent using the Bitcoin.org client the funds had many confirmations and no fee was required. When a payment for that same amount was then created using Armory, the funds did not have many confirmations and ...


4

Yes, this is possible. However, since Bob (actually, in cryptography, usually Eve, the attacker) has, apparently, got access to Alice's computer, he/she could also replace the Bitcoin application with one that does the same thing. The purpose of this procedure is to protect Alice's existing bitcoin. It does not do other things.


4

No, in general wallets are just tools to manage bitcoins already in your possession. The only exception I can think of is Mycelium, which includes a functionality to find buyers and sellers nearby. To find out how to get bitcoins, check out How do you obtain bitcoins?.


4

Here it is step-by-step Run armory in offline mode (simply run armory --offline) Import the wallet into armory if you haven't already. (Import wallet, etc) (you probably don't need to do this if you have it on USB, just run that instance) Click on the wallet and click "Backup This Wallet" and enter the password. Select "Export Key Lists" and click the ...


4

Yes, you can and should transfer your bitcoin to a wallet you control after purchasing them from a web-based wallet. Never leave a substantial amount of your bitcoin on an exchange or a web wallet. Coinbase is a company that runs both an bitcoin wallet service and an exchange for purchasing and selling bitcoin for USD. Armory is a wallet that you run ...


3

You can try this utility called pywallet. You don't need to run pywallet from the command line though - just put it in the same directory, do import pywallet, and you can use any of the functions in there. You should try running it from the command line first though, because it'll show you any missing dependencies. Functions you might find interesting: ...


3

Most alternative wallets give you the possibility of exporting the private keys. Private keys can be imported in almost every other wallet. In the case of Armory, the root key and chain code are used to generate a whole chain of private keys. You can ask for new addresses as you like inside your wallet, and by backing up only these two keys, you can recover ...


3

We just release version 0.90-beta, which finally solves this issue. Armory does not need to rescan the blockchain anymore unless you import new private keys, or Armory experiences an unclean shutdown. With the exception of the first-time startup (to build the new databases), Armory should get into online mode within 10 seconds of Bitcoin-Qt/bitcoind ...


3

When you generate new accounts inside a wallet you will only have to make a back-up once. The backup key gives armory the possibility to create a indefinite series of addresses for your wallet. Please note that by default, Armory only generates 100 addresses. This means that when you use more than 100 and you lose your wallet, after you restore the back-up, ...


3

If your settings are correct, try restarting Armory, and let it run for a few minutes. I had the same concern thinking that Armory was redownloading the blockchain, but it was actually reading from the harddrive (Listen to the harddrive). After roughly 10 minutes, the block synchronisation went from 0% very quickly to 100%, then the status changed to "...


3

In Armory: Select "Wallet Properties". Select "Backup This Wallet". Select "See Other Backup Options". Select "Export Key List". Select "Omit spaces in key data". The important string is the PrivBase58 for every bitcoin address. It is the private key of this address encoded in base58 (encoded not encrypted), which is the (only?) format Electrum accepts when ...


3

By default, Armory will check 100 addresses, but this can be changed with --keypool command-line option.


3

Re: Bitcoin-QT Core Your balance showing in BTC may not be the actual amount; is the Blockchain fully synchronised? Your BTC may be spread over several private keys ie addresses in your dat wallet The floating point value may be being rounded to an integer (ie 0.000297 may show up as 0.0003) I'd go about it like this: Open options under BitcoinQT ...


3

Ok, I've successfully transferred my .000047 BTC to my other wallet using the Bitcoin Core client. Aussie's information was pretty much critical to me figuring out how to do it. Basically, I sent myself a significant amount of bitcoins, waited a couple days, then transferred everything back to my other wallet. Because it requires the use of sending bitcoins ...


3

You can just import the backup on another computer with armory installed. It's not dependent on the computer it was created on. Remember: The coins don't actually reside on your computer - The public ledger called "blockchain" holds the amount you own. You rather hold the private key in your wallet app, that allows you to sign transactions and thus send ...


3

No, it's a bad idea to run bitcoin over tor if your striving for anonymity. Here is a paper detailing the vulnerability. While Bitcoin provides some level of anonymity (or rather pseudonymity) by encouraging the users to have any number of random-looking Bitcoin addresses, recent research shows that this level of anonymity is rather low. This encourages ...


3

Try searching the address at blockchain.info with the following link https://blockchain.info/address/<your_addres_here> It will give the current balance of that address, the transactions it was involved. Just in case if your bitcoins were transferred somewhere you would know.


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