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1

The mnemonic words that is given to you by the wallets is a representation of entropy. This entropy is then passed through PBKDF2 hashing function to generate seed. The industry standard for this conversion of mnemonic to seed is documented in BIP 39 and most wallets follow that method. The seed is then passed to HMAC-SHA512 to get a master extended private ...


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Mnemonics are the private key separated in 12 words which joined together in the very same order produces the private key That is incorrect. A mnemonic represents an entropy that is passed to a PBKDF2 key-stretching function with 2048 rounds of hashing to generate a 512 bits seed. This seed then acts like a keychain that is used to generate different keys. ...


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Yes. This works. Wallet can stay locked and 5000 addresses will be generated. It is completely safe, even server is hacked. After that you need to unlock the wallet so another 5000 addresses to be pre-generated. However, this step is not completely safe. Suppose server is hacked and someone got the password via key logger. Another possibility is... when ...


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There is a list of BIPs at https://github.com/bitcoin/bips I don't see anything that specifies a wallet format. To be honest I'd be surprised to see one. This is something that each implementation ought to determine for itself, Some wallets might use an embedded SQL DBMS, some a Berkely DB format, some a JSON store of some sort and so on. Similarly, the ...


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You are not deriving hardened child keys. You cannot derive hardened keys from an xpub. Just because the xpub itself is hardened does not mean that its children are.


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