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8

It is better to download the actual code from: https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org (this link is from the bitaddress.org site, no need to trust me :-) Click the "Download ZIP" button. Restart your computer. ** Make sure you do not have an internet connection enabled (WIFI disabled, Ethernet unplugged). Open the zip file. Open Chrome or Firefox. Drag ...


5

See the following links for an overview and for details. Note: In short, if you do not have a strong understanding of the BIP38 encryption and decryption workflow, do not BIP38-encrypt your paper wallet. Just print your paper wallet out without encryption, and keep it safe the same way you would jewels or cash. Just encrypting with AES provides excellent ...


4

BIP38 wallets are significantly more secure and are resistant to brute-force attacks when a decent passphrase is used. Generally the term "Brain Wallet" refers to one in which the private key is derived from a phrase you make up. These have been shown to be insecure because humans are bad at entropy and generally anything easy enough to remember is not ...


3

You can't. The BIP 32 extended private key format contains information which is not present in the WIF private key. The extended private key format contains the chaincode of the private key, the index, and the parent fingerprint. Those information come from the derivation of the private key itself and cannot be found elsewhere. In order to get the parent ...


3

Blockchain.info works well, exactly as you describe for BIP38 encrypted keys. I switched to Mycelium in late 2014 and have had good experiences since then. what's the state of BIP-38 integration with wallets in general? It is actually quite good now. Only obviously missing wallet is Armory: https://github.com/etotheipi/BitcoinArmory/issues/131 (Armory ...


3

The paper wallet generator from Bitaddress lets you encrypt with BIP38.


2

Brain wallets use your secret phrase to deterministically generate keys for you, meaning that you can never lose your wallet and there is no need to print it (except for extra-safe keeping). Hence the name, "brain" wallet (not paper wallet). But they have the downside that human chosen, and memorable, passphrases are usually easier to break. So in this sense,...


2

The most capable working implementation for extending BIP 38 to altcoins (having strong Bitcoin heritage) is provided by bitcoin-explorer's (bx) Key Encryption Commands (with working examples applied to Dash) that supports both BIP 38 modes: 1. AES256Encrypt, AES256Decrypt - a paper wallet use case 2. EC Multiply - a Casascius use case A backwardly ...


2

It turns out Bippy does have a bug in the encryption algorithm where it mixes up the public key compression flag. As pointed out, I posted this problem on reddit as well, and a solution has been posted there: Bippy is definitely doing something wrong. Technical Explanation BIP38 encrypted keys have 4 components (in the simplest case). The ...


1

As you know, it isn't possible to spend money using a wallet that doesn't contain the relevant private-key. Your watch-only wallet cannot be used for spending. See https://bitcoinelectrum.com/importing-your-private-keys-into-electrum/ In brief it says These instructions are for Electrum 3.0 and later. You cannot import private keys into an ...


1

If there is a bug in Bippy and it's generating incorrect encrypted private keys, that would make your unencrypted private key unrecoverable, unless the bug in Bippy was something as simple as changing the passphrase before putting it through the encryption algorithm. I haven't been able to get Bippy to build on my machine so I haven't been able to test. ...


1

The Bitcoin-Explorer (bx) v3.0 implementation described below has had FULL BIP 38 functionality for over a year, and has extended BIP 38 to numerous altcoins. See 5) Extended AES256Encrypt and AES256Decrypt BIP 38 CLI Example Set, and use -v 0 for Bitcoin instead of -v 76 for Dash. See the 4th column of BIP44 Altcoin Version Mapping Table for version ...


1

BIP38 provides a standard to create encrypted paperwallets (or physical coins in the case of Mike Caldwell). Bitcoin Core is wallet software which stores its most sensitive information in an encrypted format to protect against theft. When you export a private key from Bitcoin Core, you're essentially doing the same as when you decrypt a BIP38 paperwallet: ...


1

This doesn't appear to be possible from reading the BIP38 draft specification. However in this specific case, the key you have posted is a example from the moneywagon python module documentation. The password is 123 and the address is 1BrUfC75qyLQxxp7qcisfaMmwRMECo4ETC.


1

Take a look at http://bippy.org. The main potential issue I see with using a vanity address for cold storage is in spending from the address multiple times. If the wallet software you use isn't properly crafted (i.e., by using RFC 6979) there's a possibility that it will use the same k value during ECDSA on the transaction, which will make it possible to ...


1

Yes, you can use BIP38 with multisig. It's not exactly a brand new idea, though. I've spoken with some people from Gem (https://gem.co/), that's exactly what their API lets you do.


1

BIP38 allows you to hide your private key in plain sight. Nobody knows what the private key is until they decrypt it with the password. A brainwallet is essentially generating a private key by hashing a password or passphrase. You can generate a private key using random or pseudorandom sources, or you can hash a password or passphrase. You can then, if ...


1

Mycelium is a well-reviewed Android wallet that seems to meet the criteria you've described.


1

Bip38 QR password protection can be read by block chain.info wallets and on android it can be read by the mycellium wallet app. It will pop up a enter your password dialog box once you scan it.


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