14

Accounts are an internal bookkeeping mechanism of the Bitcoin client. They are not the same thing as addresses. When you move from one account to another, the coins remain in the same address, and if you need to spend them they will be spent from the same address. The only thing moving does is subtract a number from one account and adding to another - both ...


11

I was intending to answer another question, which was closed as a duplicate in the meantime, but I will use the case that was described there as an example to answer this question. Assuming the transaction is in fact a standard transaction, the script does in fact reveal the sender of the transaction. According to the standard transaction description in the ...


9

There are two main ways someone can hold Bitcoin On an Exchange or Online Wallet or Privately on a computer in a wallet or offline private wallet For (1) you will need to obtain the username and password to access the account. For (2) you will need to login to the computer and, depending on your luck, if the wallet is not encrypted, you should have ...


9

In reverse order. Can we close a criminal's account? No. The owner of a bitcoin address can move all the money out of the address and then delete all copies of the key pair for the address. This would amount to closing the account, as the likelihood of someone having the same address in the future is infinitesimally small. However, moving bitcoin money out ...


8

For privacy, Bitcoin relies on "pseudonymity", which means that the only way people can choose not to disclose their identity, is by making it hard to link addresses to people/businesses/.... Publishing an address publicly obviously makes you give up that privacy, but that's not a problem. everyone is free to choose so of course. The problem is that it also ...


7

"Accounts" are a concept limited to bitcoin-qt, and it's probably better to forget about them entirely. Each address has a corresponding private key, that you use to move bitcoin out of that address. A wallet is simply a collection of (address, address_key) pairs. Some people also use the term "wallet" to refer to the software that implements the wallet ...


7

Though the terminiology is unclear, in code "label" and "account" are the same thing: importprivkey function (src/rpcdump.cpp): pwalletMain->SetAddressBookName(vchAddress, strLabel); from getnewaddress function (src/rpcwallet.cpp): pwalletMain->SetAddressBookName(keyID, strAccount);


6

Those are quite some widespread questions. Tracking of account balances There are two parts that keep track of an accounts balance: each node keeps track of the transaction history a node keeps track of the private keys for the accounts it owns Bitcoin at its core is a distributed ledger that keeps track of every transaction ever executed. Every node in ...


5

A Wallet is a collection of Accounts and Addresses. An Account is an arbitrary basket of Addresses. Transactions originating from and going into one Account will be kept separate from other Accounts (unless you use a move command, which moves the balances around without creating new transactions). Address is the only part of this that is visible in the ...


5

The root account is the account that owns the XRP in the initial ledger. ACCOUNT_ZERO is an account whose 160-bit identifier is zero. When dealing with a currency/issuer pair, ACCOUNT_ZERO is used as both the currency and the issuer to indicate XRP. ACCOUNT_ONE is an account whose 160-bit identifier is one. ACCOUNT_ONE is used in cases where no account is ...


5

It can't be closed, because there is no account. Likewise if he/she were using cash dollars for criminal purposes, it would not be possible to "close his wallet" as if it were some "account".


5

Addresses are not magically tied to the hardware you use. If you delete the file that contains the private keys for your addresses, you will lose them and thus lose access to your Bitcoin. Since it seems that you formatted your hard drive without making a backup of your wallet file, your private keys and thus your Bitcoin are lost. You may be able to ...


4

No one -- not a government, not the Bitcoin core developers -- can "close" a Bitcoin "account" because no central authority has unilateral control to do so. The closest it comes to "closing" an account is deleting the private key to an account, and such could only be done by forcing the holder to do so or tricking them into using a service that compromises ...


4

bitcoind does not allow you to delete addresses. (If it did, the next question people would ask is, "How do I undelete addresses?" :)) However, you can use the rpc call setaccount to change the account associated with the address. The first argument to setaccount should the the address you're changing; the second shound be the account you're moving it to. (...


4

Bitcoin Core since 0.15 supports multiwallet. That is probably much closer to what people expected the accounts feature to be (and confusion about it is one of the reasons for deprecating it). Using multiwallet, one Bitcoin Core instance can maintain multiple entirely separated wallets simultaneously. They all have their own addresses, own keys, own ...


3

I have a third option: We get rid of Anti-money laundering (AML) regulations. Money laundering has been criminalized in the United States since the Money Laundering Control Act of 1986. Perhaps it's time to reverse that decision.


3

Nope. Or, at least, unless you are law enforcement and have a subpoena. Or, unless you redeemed it yourself (which would list in your deposit history). You can tell if it has been redeemed by redeeming it yourself and seeing if it had funds, but that's about it.


3

Bitstamp and any other exchange are companies and so can be insolvent. If you transfer $1000 to them in exchange for bitcoins. Until they send you the bitcoins they are in to debt to you for that amount. You could take them to court to recover that if they failed to provide the bitcoins or a refund. The court could issue an order allowing the companies ...


3

The human mind can remember approximately 7 digits quickly and easily. That's how you can remember US phone numbers (sans area code) without even thinking about it. However, when it gets to 10 digits it starts to reach the limit of working memory, and 20 digits is definitely out for most people. Of course, if you actually spent the time to try to memorize it,...


3

Note, anonymity isn't a design goal for ripple. Depending on the level of pseudo-anonymity required, gateway and future features of Ripple would likely be easier (and more cost effective) than using many Ripple addresses (aka Ripple accounts). To tell if two (or more) Ripple addresses are in the same family you need the public generator (which is named for ...


3

First of all, there are many types of off-chain transactions. Any movement of value in BTC that does not directly correspond to a blockchain transaction can be classified as one. This includes: giving someone a computer/phone that has a wallet witg BTC on it giving someone a private key/physical bitcoin. giving someone access to a shared webwallet account ...


2

Yes, all move operations add an accounting entry to the wallet. If listtransactions doesn't show the move, this is most likely to be a problem with listtransactions.


2

If your (UK) business is in an area where you have specific regulations to follow for anti-money laundering, and you do, you will already know the answer. (If it is not in the UK, you may have to find out if dealing with UK-registered Bitstamp means you'll have to start complying with UK law and its requirements like KYC: Know Your Customer.) Otherwise, the ...


2

The only way to do that would be to change the account associated to the address that received the transaction. Have a look at setaccount.


2

There is no general answer for all cases; it will depend entirely on the ways he chose to store and secure any Bitcoins, which vary a lot from person to person. You will need to have a trusted person look through his effects, both digital and physical. This person should be both an expert in the systems your brother used, and Bitcoin itself. If this ...


2

Please don't use bitcoin cores accounting system anymore (especially for new projects). It has been deprecated (and might be removed in near future). A way of solving your issue would be by calling getaddressesbyaccount (get addresses of a specific account) and then use listunspent with these addresses. Then you could create your own coin selection and use ...


2

Bitcoin uses the so called UTXO (Unspent Transaction Output) model. The first time it is not very intuitive because it is different from the traditional accounting model where you just spend from and send to an account. Think about full piggy banks that can't be filled more than they are and that you have to break open before being able to spend the content: ...


2

Step 1. I backup the wallet and go offline. Step 2. Someone send me a bitcoin to this wallet and i can see it(in balance). When you're off the internet the wallet software will not know the transaction occurred until it is synced with other nodes on the network (P2P protocol). However, as long as the sender is online, the transaction will still be pushed ...


2

If someone has gained knowledge of your wallet's mnemonic seed phrase, and used it to create a transaction which spends all of your funds to an address that the attacker controls, then there is no way to recover the funds once that transaction confirms (short of contacting the hacker, and asking nicely to have the funds returned). Bitcoin transactions are ...


1

You can type 'bitcoind help' to get the available commands. You can also type 'bitcoind help command' to get more information about the command. You can find your balance in multiple ways: getbalance: returns the balance of your wallet.dat as a number, you can specify an account (if set) in quotes to get information for a specific account, the default ...


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