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0

The strings you posted are technically transaction IDs not transaction hashes and have to be reversed to get that "actual hash". In bitcoin when hashes are printed as strings they are reversed. The actual hashes you should use are d61dcc0e13256adb725861971b4bae753859ee61e406392305a4fddc54b55721|...


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The tool you are linking to is hashing text, Bitcoin hashes are of bytes.


0

Obsc location Anon P2P Bridge Dissoc Tor Only Yes Yes(Tor) Yes(Tor) Yes i2p Only Yes Yes(I2P) No Yes Tor+i2P Yes Yes Yes(slow) Yes Tor+i2P+IPv4 No Yes Yes(fast) No https://www.reddit.com/r/TOR/comments/o5z4r1/tor_and_i2p_tradeoffs/h2sw202?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3 Basic differences between Tor and i2p: https://github.com/...


6

While nodes are set to be listening by default, the vast majority does not permit inbound connections either because listening has been disabled or their network setup doesn't make the necessary port accessible. There seem to be in the range of 8-10k listening nodes, while estimates for non-listening nodes range in 60-400k depending on the source. Next to ...


0

This is not surprising, and I believe it is actually normal behavior. It's an artifact of the flood method that Bitcoin uses to relay blocks and transactions. Consider the following: one of your peers announces an unknown transaction of size 1000 bytes to your node, so your node requests and downloads. Now your node announces the same transaction to every ...


0

The input to submitblock is a "serialized" raw block in HEX. The format for a "serialized" block is here (hard to find!).... https://developer.bitcoin.org/reference/block_chain.html#serialized-blocks The raw transactions included at the end of the "serialized" block format are themselves formatted like this... https://developer....


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I wasn't running it as root. Once I ran it with sudo bitcoind -daemon --datadir=/mnt/bitcoin/Coins/Blockchain, it worked as expected.


3

When it says, "connect" it is referring to connecting in the TCP/IP sense. The vulnerability simply required you having the ability to open a TCP/IP connection to bitcoind's RPC port, which is before any concept of authentication even comes into play. It isn't that it was possible to send JSON-RPC commands to bitcoind without authentication (this ...


0

This is not really an answer to this question, but the title caught my attention, as we just released the "Bitcoin blockchain full data" in JSON format, as well as methods and tools to collect/process it, see our paper: Full Bitcoin Blockchain Data Made Easy


1

Yes. All command line options can be specified in the bitcoin.conf file using the same name without the leading dash (-). For -reindex-chainstate, you add reindex-chainstate=1 to your bitcoin.conf.


0

brew install berkeley-db@4 worked for me


1

If about 5 GB is affordable for your laptop drive, you could still keep the datadir on it, and move the block storage only to the external drive by adding blocksdir=/path/to/external/blocksdir to your bitcoin.conf. This solution allows you to keep your wallets on your laptop drive using default wallet location. If your laptop drive is SSD, while external one ...


2

Bitcoin Core will construct a Tor hidden service by default, if a Tor control port is found and Tor is configured to allow it. You can use torcontrol=0 to disable it.


2

You can't merge them, but you can just copy the old blocks/ and chainstate/ subdirectories of an old install that you trust. It'll just continue where you left off then.


2

This is a BIP173 native segwit address. If you unselect the "Generate native segwit (Bech32) address" checkbox in bitcoin-qt, you'll get a P2SH 3xxx address instead. Most senders these days support sending the BIP173 addresses though, which are cheaper for you to use. The GUI no longer supports creation of legacy 1xxx addresses by default. You can ...


1

If you get here like I did, trying to remember where the signatures of the various releases are stored/attested-to, it's at https://github.com/bitcoin-core/gitian.sigs There, you'll find the manifests of gitian builds.


2

-rpcuser was missing in the command. Also, the onion address exposed through getnetworkinfo is irrelevant. Bitcoin Core is only automatically setting up an onion service for P2P communication, not RPC. Below command works fine: torify bitcoin-cli -rpcconnect=vazr3k6bgnfafmdpcmbegoe5ju5kqyz4tk7hhntgaqscam2qupdtk2yd.onion -rpcport=1309 -rpcuser=user3 -...


0

Well, I am not sure if I got this question right but it sounds pretty strange to me that your wallet.dat file is changing its size. It is only storing your private key (most likely in an encrypted way) and should never change after it is created. What most clients like bitcoin-qt are doing is to download the blockchain which may increase your wallet folder. ...


1

You can download a database dump from blockchair.com at https://gz.blockchair.com/bitcoin/addresses/ The database is updated daily and is contains a balance of satoshis for every address on the network.


0

Yes. Your private key(s) is (the important part of) your wallet. See: https://developer.bitcoin.org/reference/rpc/importprivkey.html


3

Lightning Network, as it's described, seems to solve all the problems with Bitcoin. That's not true. I would even say that Ligntning Network doesn't on its own solve any of Bitcoin's problems, but it does go a long way towards solving several of them (scalability and privacy). I'm unable to accept payments due to the insane fees, but would be able to if ...


0

Here is my work around. I still have a hard time believing that the test code needs revision, but this is what I did and the tests now pass. From the above, I changed the call of RunCommandParseJSON() to provide for the explicit call of the command window. Apparently, this is needed for Windows. The line became: 57 const UniValue result = ...


0

Your process is correct, if you're not using a cold wallet at the very least you can use a mobile wallet like Blockstream's Green wallet or software like exodus for your computer (which also allows you to add 2FA authenticator apps). However, using a hardware wallet is the most secure method.


3

Confirmation is not Validation Miners are not Adjudicators How does the 1-CPU-1 vote works There is no voting system in Bitcoin. There is no counting of votes. When Nakamoto wrote about voting in the Bitcoin whitepaper, they were using the word in an abstract, almost poetic way, not literally. Just as tigers vote for species of deer by choosing which to ...


0

double hashed format: ie SHA256(SHA256(rawtransaction)) Your understanding of this is very, very wrong. The data structure stored in a blockchain is not double hashed. Instead there are two hashes stored in the data structure. Instead of SHA256(SHA256(rawtransaction)). You should visualize the blockchain data structure as: struct Block { Transactions[] ...


3

Adding more advanced prediction of what transactions are useful to prefill was probably intended as a TODO when Compact Blocks were implemented, but to the best of my knowledge, nobody has worked on it since. It is worth pointing out that Compact Blocks in practice (and in non-adverserial situations) works extremely well. On my own long-running node, as of ...


10

This is a question of definition. The blockchain doesn't store anything, it's an abstract data structure that's collectively maintained by nodes in a network. Those nodes are the ones that store things. That may or may not include the actual transaction data - it doesn't matter. The Bitcoin blockchain consists of hash-linked block headers. Every block header ...


2

Command to create new address is same as you mentioned in the question: createnewaddress() You can only create P2PKH (legacy) addresses in a wallet with 'standard' seed: Command to create a standard seed: make_seed(seed_type="standard") 'standard' can be replaced by 'segwit' for a wallet with bech32 addresses Create new wallet with the seed ...


0

Because it was added as memory-only filter by Jeff Garzik in PR: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/1861/ It might be nice to store this in the wallet, but to judge interest and review the interface, this is a useful first step. Couple of users who care about privacy wanted persistency for locking unspents and created issue: https://github.com/bitcoin/...


3

It depends on what you want. If you want to know the amount of currency that has been available for miners to bring into circulation (the "210000-1 blocks of 50 BTC, then 210000 blocks of 25 BTC, then 210000 blocks of 12.5 BTC, ..." rule), the answer is no, there is no RPC that computes this. It's easy to do yourself, though. If you want to compute ...


0

There are many things that can be wrong. More details are required, like the code you mentioned. There is a more thorough discussion on this matter here: https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/106601/113203


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