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You can use my blockchain parser (python script) that converts the local copy of blockchain (blkXXXXX.dat files) to human readable text view -> my parser Bases on this parser you can do anything you want with that data.


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You could check https://github.com/Blockstream/esplora I think it ticks all of the boxes, I am not sure about the NBitcoin though.


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The message potential stale tip detected, will retry extra outbound peers is associated with at least two situations: A firewall is blocking port 8333 and your node cannot communicate with peers. Problems with genesis block (delete blocks and chainstate directories and restart).


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You can do sudo apt-get install -y software-properties-common sudo add-apt-repository -u ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo add-apt-repository -u ppa:lightningnetwork/ppa sudo apt-get install bitcoind lightningd If you don't want to add external repositories you can flollow the clightning docs from https://github.com/ElementsProject/lightning/blob/master/doc/INSTALL....


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What is this "time lag" ? When a miner finds a block, they will broadcast it to the network. As with all real-world networks, there is a latency (“lag time”) for this information to be received by the other nodes in the network. Specifically, there will be some amount of latency between the miner that found the block, and other miners on the network. Even ...


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A soft fork describes a situation in which the consensus rules of the network are tightened: in simple terms, something that was allowed before is no longer allowed. After a soft fork, old nodes will still be a part of the network, even if they are unaware of this rule-tightening. However, miners will need to craft blocks according to the new rules, or ...


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Most services run their own services which track the UTXOs that they need. They use Bitcoin Core as an edge node which forwards all of the valid blocks and transactions to their internal software that adds them all to a database. This could be a software based on insight or Abe or something homegrown. In this way, they don't need to implement consensus and ...


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No, it is not possible to catch up via ZMQ itself. A sequence number is present with each notification so you can detect when you've missed notifications. In those cases, then you can fetch the missing blocks and transactions over the RPC interface.


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You actually did get the same hash. It's just that every Bitcoin software displays hashes byte swapped. If you look closely, you'll see that the first byte of your result (66) matches the last byte of the displayed merkleroot. The second byte matches the second to last byte, and so on. Internally, the merkleroot (and other hashes) are in the same order as ...


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getinfo has been deprecated as an RPC command, and the hyphenated version is provided as a bridge for legacy applications that have not yet moved to getblockchaininfo and getnetworkinfo. For regular RPC commands, you do not need the hyphen, and can simply run them as bitcoin-cli getblockchaininfo. The hyphenated parameters control the behaviour of bitcoin-...


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Most services operating large scale wallets only use Bitcoin Core for networking information, and maintain a separate utxo set for wallet purposes. There are many existing options to build a full utxo set that can be queried for arbitrary addresses, such as the insight project. Moreover, recent versions of Bitcoin Core come with the scantxoutset RPC call, ...


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Speaking as a formal wallet engineer, what we did back then, Once in a while, we would batch generate lots of bitcoin addresses and import them into bitcoind. Can't speak for ALL applications, for us, we let bitcoind manage all its UTXO set. Depending on the situation, if the address is newly generated by you, then no, you have to import it first because, ...


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The signature signs the spending transaction(*). Modifying it in any way will invalidate the signatures in it. (*) Not actually, as it's obviously impossible for the signature to sign itself. There are also means for a signature to indicate it explicitly does not sign certain parts of the transaction, permitting those to be modified after the fact.


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There is no explicit marker that identifies a hash as being related to a transaction/block, but as mentioned by OP, there is an implicit assumption that can be made, due to the difficulty target for blocks that is imposed by the network’s nodes. Pragmatically, this means that a hash with an improbably low value could be assumed to be a potential block hash....


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This is not possible, both are sha256 hashes, and contain no markers as to their origin.


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No, Bitcoin Core uses the BIP32 derivation path m/0'/0', and you are unable to change the derivation path of the wallet in Bitcoin Core. There is however the Hardware Wallet Interface (HWI) that might be what you are looking for. https://github.com/bitcoin-core/HWI https://github.com/bitcoin-core/HWI/blob/master/docs/bitcoin-core-usage.md


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To spend some BTC, the network’s nodes will require a valid cryptographic signature on the transaction that consumes the UTXO in question. Each UTXO is locked to some bitcoin address, and to create a signature that is valid for that address you’ll need knowledge of the private key used to derive/create that address. So a miner is not in any sort of ...


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When your client start the connection with another peer it is outbound, otherwise it is inbound. If you want to be sure that your tor node is properly setup and that other peer can connect to you, check: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Setting_up_a_Tor_hidden_service


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Raghav Sood: you are right: here the correct code: const addresses = bitcoinjs.address.fromOutputScript(outputScript, bitcoinjs.networks.testnet); Thanks :-)


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When you create the wallet that you are importing your keys into, presumably with something like bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet='mywallet' importmulti, it needs to be created in watchonly mode, meaning with private keys disabled. To do that, create the wallet with bitcoin-cli createwallet 'mywallet' true, where true is the argument for disable_private_keys, creating ...


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No, there is no support for this. It is not an interface which uses the RPC interface, it has much deeper access within the wallet than RPC provides.


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When you don't explicitly specify any RPC credentials, bitcoind will autogenerate them for you and store the password in the $DATADIR/.cookie file. You can then use the username __cookie__ along with the password from that file.


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You cannot request this information, because it does not exist. There is no central registry of nodes, nor do they have identities to begin with. Full nodes do maintain a database of IP addresses of peers they now about, but that is not, and is not intended to be, a comprehensive list of all nodes on the network. The closest that exists are network ...


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It depends on your specific data directory. Bitcoin Core uses a LevelDB database for the index and LevelDB handles the exact storage format and files of the database. This can be different for every data directory. There is no particular file that that record is stored in that Bitcoin Core knows.


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It's not supposed to. createpsbt does not have access to the wallet so it cannot fill in any input or output information. If you want those to be filled in, you can use walletcreatefundedpsbt.


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Root cause. The root cause of the problem is default settings in docker container. More precisely, network settings mode which has bridge mode by default. In bridge mode all incoming connections are seen from inside docker container as coming from the same IP address (which is 172.17.0.1). There are multiple hard forks out there so a foreign node running ...


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Okay, I figured that out. After you run tests, you will see a bunch of *.gcno files. Then, do: # better to work in a separate dir mkdir cov && cd cov lcov -c -d ../src -o cov.info genhtml cov.info And open index.html cov dir.


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Regarding your title, without knowing the private key, no one can withdraw your BTC, that's for sure. First of all, I would argue it's a bad idea to use a third-party online service to generate and manage your keys. I went to check the blockcypher site, it seemed legit. Did you spend your coins? If so, the money may be moved to a new address because the ...


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You're looking for walletnotify setting in bitcoin.conf It will call the specified script for every transaction received for your own wallets. walletnotify=/some/path/mywalletscript.py Here mywalletscript.py will handle the JSON data passed into it. Here is a sample walletnotify implementation including database access. It's a bit dated but should give ...


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The node does not need to sync fully in order for RPC to start responding to queries. What happens is Bitcoin Core starts up in "warm up" mode. During warm up RPC is unavailable because the system is being setup. This is when wallets, the network your local UTXO information, setting the block index and verifying your local blocks take place. (I suspect you ...


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Try to allow RPC calls on particular IP or whitelist all IP's, for example: rpcallowip=0.0.0.0/0 Plus try to check debug.log if the connection appeared on daemon it should report. If not, probably firewall issues on a system itself.


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Like this? This guide is intended for users of Bitcoin-Qt who do not want to wait for their wallet to be synchronized with the network, which may take many hours or days depending on the hardware spec. The guide teaches users how to transfer their coins to Electrum bitcoin wallet, which has lower security but a faster startup time. To answer your ...


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First of all I think there seems to be a small confusion about the notation. One does not spend a transaction but transaction outputs. In the case of offered htlcs the output is only one (of potentially many others) output. Also I understand the timelock slightly different. If you publish the commitment transaction it can be mined and verified directly. It ...


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Compliance with the "Replay Protected Sighash" is required in all BCH transactions since the BTC-BCH chain split, while on Bitcoin BIP143 is only required for spending SegWit outputs. Here is how it helps offline signing if you want to know how it was invented. Update: has the information about the input value as part of the witness. Note that the ...


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What did you actually import in Electrum? A master privatekey, or a list of private keys? In the first case, it could be that your gap limit (i.e. the addresses actively monitored by Electrum) is set too low, so it doesn't see some of your UTXOs. You can check this out : wallet.gap_limit Then increase the number you will see, for example if it tells you "...


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If I understand your question, your latency compared to blockchain.info is motivated to the blockchain.ifo use the node distributed to the world and you have only the one node. I have read this reasearch where write this In any peer-to-peer system, dierent nodes will receive thesame data at different times. Blockchain.info uses a geographi-...


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I ran bitcoind from Flatpak and it outputted the .cookie file


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According to your description (having problems while syncing full node), I wonder if your "unconfirmed transaction" is really unconfirmed? Is it already confirmed, or discarded (due to double-spending etc)? The first problem: "stuck" 0-confirmation transaction First of all, replace-by-fee is there to deal with "low-fee stuck transactions" problem, you ...


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It's not possible to remove your transmitted transaction from the network. Even if you shut down and clean your own local client, other clients around the world have it in their mempool. That's why your local client reflects the balance minus the amount you sent, even though it's not confirmed. That's how it's supposed to work, Bitcoin TX's are supposed to ...


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