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0

I had an problem equals and I used The client bitcoin for C++, but if you want to get the address of the transaction with the command decodescript and the hex script, with your example with your I ran in the console bitcoin-qt this command decodescript 76a914d63cc1e3b6009e31d03bd5f8046cbe0f7e37e8c088ac an I got this information { "asm": "OP_DUP ...


2

There are currently three different ways to do this: raw transactions, PSBT in 0.17, and PSBT in 0.18. I recommend that you use PSBT in 0.18 as it is the least hassle, but I will describe all three here for you. Traditionally, you would do this with createrawtransaction, fundrawtransaction, and signrawtransactionwithkey/signrawtransactionwithwallet. One ...


2

Your input txid output index is 5 bytes, when it should be 4 bytes. Just remove the extra 00 byte and the transaction will not pop an error. However, you might need to sign this transaction again as signature involves signing the entire serialized transaction as a message and by changing the txid outpoint you will change the message that is signed.


2

What you are referring to are stale blocks. Orphaned blocks are one for which the previous (parent) hash field points to an unknown block or to a block not yet processed by the local node. Since Bitcoin Core follows headers first approach, block headers are downloaded and validated first before downloading the block data. As a result, full nodes will never ...


0

You may be interested in the work being done on HWI (hardware wallet interface). See also: using HWI with bitcoin-core. This software is still in development, so use at your own risk, but it may help accomplish the goal of being able to use bitcoin-core as a full node to validate transactions related to your wallet, while having an efficient backup method, ...


1

You can connect your Electrum wallet to your own Electrum server to preserve privacy. There are different Electrum server implementations: Electrum Personal Server Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum bitcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum wallet to your own full node. ElectrumX - ...


1

You can use the getbalances command. It will return all of the balances belonging to the wallet, including ones the wallet can sign for, watch only things, trusted (confirmed transactions and unconfirmed change), and immature coinbase outputs. Here is the help output for it. getbalances Returns an object with all balances in BTC. Result: { "mine": { ...


-1

I think his computer is compromised. I had a guy I know tell me today he had the same happen to him. He created a paper wallet from bitcoinpaperwallet, generated a key in offline mode. He printed out the key and deleted all traces off it. Went back online, sent the money and within 1 minute it was all gone. Someone could easily create malware to monitor for ...


2

The Bitcoin software has always used OpenSSL's random number generator in some way to generate private keys. Originally, it just used OpenSSL's EC_KEY_generate_key function to generate a new key and OpenSSL would handle the RNG and object creation. Even now, Bitcoin Core still uses OpenSSL's RNG and mixes it's output with several other sources of randomness ...


4

You can, but it seems you'd get the worst of all worlds: It's slower than letting Bitcoin Core download and validate simultaneously (as you need to wait until you have the full torrent before validation can start). It takes (temporarily) more space than just running a non-pruned node (as you're storing the torrent download + the Bitcoin Core data directory ...


-1

Prune can happen but the client must still verify the chain from start to finish. Most devices are not limited by the download speed of the chain, it is usually to do with the verification of the transactions already created.


2

Try: $ bitcoin-cli getaddressinfo '<your address>' { "address" : "address", (string) The bitcoin address validated "scriptPubKey" : "hex", (string) The hex-encoded scriptPubKey generated by the address "ismine" : true|false, (boolean) If the address is yours or not "iswatchonly" : true|false, (boolean) If the address is ...


1

The account API has been deprecated for a while, and was completely removed in Bitcoin Core 0.18.0. You should be using the new mutliwallet API, or handling account based labelling externally.


2

From my own experience, running ABCore on a Nexus 5X, Android is too eager to kill processes that use a large amount of memory on systems with less than 3 GB.


1

Lets say bitcoin become a global currency which replace fiat money Logically, if Bitcoin were to fully replace fiat money and be used for every transaction, then we should expect there would be some way of facilitating transactions easily, in pretty much every situation. Otherwise, people aren't going to adopt it if it is a worse solution that what is ...


0

An address is a human construct, and is meaningless to the p2p protocol - The p2p protocol is only concerned with Bitcoin Scripts. If you have a raw tx object, you can attempt to find the address for an output by checking if the locking script (scriptPubKey) field matches the format for a known p2sh, p2pkh, p2wpkh, or p2pk address. If it does, you can ...


2

Bitcoin Core does not track each individual address, only the addresses associated with your wallet. There are other clients, such as bitcore-insight and btcd, which maintain a separate address index. Alternatively, you can implement an index yourself, or run an existing one such as ElectrumX.


1

After searching about this, i found out that each full node maintains a database with the set of unspent transaction outputs (UTXOs) in the memory. So When a new transaction is added, its UTXOs get updated accordingly (source). Also, a full node keeps track of all transactions that ever happened (source) and offer this: Filtering transactions and blocks ...


0

You can make dump privat keys of all your addresses: dumpwallet version 0.13.0 Exports all wallet private keys to file And other interesting commands: encryptwallet Encrypts the wallet with . importprivkey [label] [rescan=true] Adds a private key (as returned by dumpprivkey) to your wallet. This may take a while, as a rescan is done, looking ...


3

Signing transaction is a bit more complicated than just signing the hash of unsigned transaction Look at the explanations here: Redeeming a raw transaction step by step example required How to redeem a basic Tx?


2

Bitcoin Core uses BIP32, but does not implement BIP39 - As such, you cannot export a set of seed words, since the seed to BIP32 master key conversions is one way only, and it is not possible to obtain seed words if you only have the master key. You should simply back up the master key itself, and import it into another instance of bitcoin core when needed. ...


2

Nodes do not validate blocks from genesis each time a new block is received. During the initial sync, nodes will validate, at the very minimum, the headers from the genesis block upto the current chain head - this allows them to find the best chain (by amount of work done). They also usually verify the utxo set. When a new block is received, simply ...


0

Judging by the source code, smartfee will be used (conf_target) https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/6e9eda556717ad651a6a691db8d6dc68556285cb/src/wallet/fees.cpp#L38 /* User control of how to calculate fee uses the following parameter precedence: 1. coin_control.m_feerate 2. coin_control.m_confirm_target 3. m_pay_tx_fee (user-set member ...


0

I found the answer seconds after I posted my questions. I was not writing the code right, here it is openssl enc -d -aes-256-cbc -md md5 -a -in /Users/adriangonzalez/Desktop/bitcoin-wallet-backup-2019-06-26-22-20 -out ~/Desktop/file.txt https://github.com/bitcoin-wallet/bitcoin-wallet/blob/master/wallet/README.recover.md


3

This is unrelated to segregated witness. Since Bitcoin Core version v0.17, signatures have low R signatures. The signing operating is repeated until an R value is constructed that's below 2255. On average this only takes 2 attempts, but it makes all signatures equally long (71 bytes; rather than 50% 71 bytes and 50% 72 bytes), making them more predictable ...


2

which, as I understand it, makes some data (until 2017?) real without verification. You understand incorrectly. Firstly, the assumevalid blocks is updated at every major release, so it is at most a couple of months out of date for the most recent release. For Bitcoin Core 0.18.0, the assumevalid block is ...


0

the other answers suggest closing your node copying directories etc, NOT necessary. Here is how i did it starting with an old wallet2.dat file: create a folder foo (any name, any directory) copy the file wallet2.dat into folder foo and rename the wallet to wallet.dat on the GUI click Window->Console and type into the > field: help loadwallet which will tell ...


0

Updating the ColdCard to the latest (unreleased) firmware shows the xpub that is compatible with my above code and works flawlessly with the above example. The same ColdCard with the new dump summary outputs: # Coldcard Wallet Summary File ## For wallet with master key fingerprint: 18734CBE Wallet operates on blockchain: Bitcoin Testnet For BIP44, this ...


1

For a node to be disconnected the default threshold of banscore is 100. In versions prior to v0.18, the default time to keep the misbehaving peer from reconnecting is 86,400 seconds or 1 day. However, this was circumvented by attackers with multiple IP addresses. v0.18 release, allows peers that your node automatically disconnected for misbehavior (e.g. ...


7

Before you delete you Bitcoin data from your hard drive, ensure that you have backed up the wallet.dat file, or you risk losing your bitcoins in case you received them on the addresses generated by Bitcoin-Core. Ubuntu The most easy way to remove Bitcoin-Core from Ubuntu is by running: sudo apt-get remove bitcoind. When you run bitcoind, it typically (...


0

v0.18.0 release notes include: systemd init file The systemd init file (contrib/init/bitcoind.service) has been changed to use /var/lib/bitcoind as the data directory instead of ~bitcoin/.bitcoin. This change makes Bitcoin Core more consistent with other services, and makes the systemd init config more consistent with existing Upstart and ...


1

The wallet file contains the hash (and more) information about the tip of the chain it has been synchronized to. This means that generally when loading a wallet into a running node, it will be modified every time a new block comes in. Furthermore the wallet file also contains all transactions affecting the wallet balance. If you sent or received any ...


3

The issue is that your hardened paths use the single quote notation which breaks the single quoting that surrounds the entire import command. You will need to escape those properly, and \' is not the way to do that. Instead, for every single quote within your import command, you need to do '"'"' - an explanation for why can be found here. Alternatively, you ...


0

The best way to implement accounts is to insource Address database Private key database Transaction signing and leave only transaction relaying and checking for transactions to Bitcoin Core.


2

This is expected. You don't appear to be accounting for fees. If you account for them, you get: +0.0005 386d83da01218ca74cbe72b19a6814293b98357921042a9b03ab39706fef8736 +0.0001 8e95c68f524e557a9b42d11207effae89c4e61913c5c4758adb142a6cdd03848 -0.00001 with -0.00034408 as Fees 91224995f2c240159141a499b91db8d26f0a6425fb12f5277d2f735576596aa7 -0.00001 with -0....


1

I then set keypool to false and internal to true: This is what you are doing wrong. Bitcoin Core has a separate change keypool. By not setting keypool to true, the imported pubkeys won't be added to the change keypool.


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