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24

from: https://github.com/schildbach/bitcoin-wallet/tree/master/wallet The backup file is encrypted using your chosen password. You can use OpenSSL to decrypt: openssl enc -d -aes-256-cbc -a -in <filename>


9

If you don't have the private key, there is no way to access those coins. Period. The security of Bitcoin as a currency relies on that fact. Either recover the private key somehow, or consider the coins gone.


9

Bech32 is an address format that was only recently proposed. While its design had input from multiple wallet authors, it is way too early to say anything about adoption. It is important to realize that there is no hurry about this. Every usable address type is available through embedding in P2SH, which is compatible with every wallet created the past few ...


6

Since "when you're a developer it's easy" is probably not sufficient for most people, here is the full step-by-step from a Android Bitcoin Wallet to importing the private keys in Electrum which (finally...) worked for me. This solution uses bitcoinj. The approach using the .proto definition file and opening the wallet in Python was also tested, but seems ...


4

Bitcoin Wallet for Android supports backing up your private keys to external storage (e.g. SD Card). Just select "Export/Import private keys" from the action bar overflow menu.


4

The first byte, 1D, is the length. The next three bytes are the high bytes of the hash. So we have 00ffff, then we add ff bytes onto the end to get to 29 bytes. Then we're done. We wind up with 3 bytes of leading zeroes because 32-29 is 3. And we get one byte of zeroes from the second byte of the compact bits. So the final result is 00,00,00,00,ff,ff,ff...


4

TL;DR: It seems that Bitcoin Wallet for Android incorrectly labels nLockTime transactions as OptInRBF due to a bug in bitcoinj. The issue has been reported. You don't need to do anything. Apparently, Bitcoin Wallet for Android recognized your transaction as OptInRBF (as pointed out by the code you found). The warning you are seeing was only added to the ...


4

Your wallet keeps all private and public keys it ever used indefinitely. You do not lose coins on old private keys when you give out new addresses. It is just a privacy measure to give out new addresses for each transaction. It prevents your business partners from knowing about other transactions you have received and sent. All addresses can be used ...


4

Yes, use Send Coins > Options > Fee to select one of three fee levels. The actual fee is dynamic and depends on the byte size of your payment. Use Priority if a payment is urgent Normal if you want confirmation roughly within the next hour Economic if you don't care about confirmation times (mostly if you're sending to another wallet of yours)


3

I don't know why your wallet didn't include a fee, and it would probably require a fair amount of debugging to figure out what went wrong. Here are my suggestions for following up on this problem: Make sure your transaction really didn't include a fee. Open your wallet, find the transaction is the list of outgoing transactions, and press-and-hold on it to ...


3

If you didn't see the error message bad decrypt, and if the garbage you saw had the string org.bitcoin.production, then the decryption worked. In recent versions of Bitcoin Wallet, as explained in the README, the wallet backup is no longer encrypted plain text but a custom protobuf format. You can write the decrypted wallet to a file using the -out option ...


3

You are trying to use addresses for accounting, but they aren't designed for that. What you actually want is the accounts feature of bitcoind, though I doubt any mobile wallet implements such a thing. If you say explicitly why do you think you need to do that, someone might have an answer. Meanwhile, just use the whole balance, and create a new address for ...


3

I don't have an account, but just popping in to clear this up. F-Droid repos sign all of the published apps with a separate, private key. For obvious reasons, that key is not the same as the one used by upstream. Why don't we use the same key as upstream? Because we compile the apps ourselves, and because we can't expect upstream devs to always sign our ...


3

From this discussion: How to create a checkpoint file Run mvn exec:java -Dexec.mainClass=com.google.bitcoin.tools.BuildCheckpoints in the tools/ directory from the bitcoinj repository. BuildCheckpoints expects you to have a fully synced local Bitcoin-Qt/bitcoind instance running.


3

Yes you will be able to access the same coins with both devices. You can think about it like if you make a copy of a key to your home, and give it to someone; both people will be able to open the same door.


3

Consider to use a hardware wallet: https://bitcoin.org/en/choose-your-wallet. IMO all of the available hardware wallet do allow to export an xpub. But watch out (regardless of what wallet you are going to use)! Even if you private keys are safe when you use public child key derivation, what happens if an attacker compromises your server and replaces the ...


3

i need to know that what will I be charged by the network. The network doesn't charge you, you decide what to pay the miners, and the miners determine if your transaction fee is high enough to include in the next block or not (since they get the transaction fees). It doesn't look like Blockchain.info has an API for estimating the fee (it is an estimate, ...


2

Since January 14 on my Galaxy Nexus, Bitcoin Wallet for Android has used 120 bytes of mobile data. It's used approximately 160 MB of data on WiFi in the same period. One month cycle earlier, it used 463 KB of mobile data, and approximately 113 MB on WiFi. I plug it in every night and whenever I'm in my car. I can't answer for the amount of data necessary ...


2

That wallet is using bitcoinj as its client which implements a "simplified payment verification" mode. Here's what the client does in this implementation: Connects to a trusted node. Downloads only the block headers. Validates the headers. Do they chain back to genesis block? Is difficulty high enough? Do I trust this node enough? Downloads only the ...


2

If you want to move Bitcoins in the sense of a wallet command it would require some more technical integration. However, the easiest thing is to scan the QR-code of your Android mobile wallet with your webcam. I use QuickMark for the scanning. Then you can simply copy paste the Bitcoin address to your desktop wallet and send Bitcoins to your phone via the ...


2

There is no option in Bitcoin to control which address transactions are sent "from". The Bitcoin client will use one (or more) of your addresses which have previously been sent sufficient funds to cover your new transaction. To make this clearer, consider an example. Somebody (person A) sends you (person Y) some coins. A -> Y1 [2 coins] Now somebody ...


2

I tried to dump private keys but i couldn't. Using wallet-tool, I obtain a text file with public keys, addresses, some other information, and the words: "Seed is encripted". So I use this phyton script to obtain seed, and it apparentely worked. Then I use this standalone page: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/iancoleman/bip39/master/bip39-standalone.html ...


2

The main issue seems to be a misunderstanding of this message: "Synchronizing with network, 6 weeks behind." This indicates that your wallet will be processing transaction data of the last six weeks to ascertain whether any of it is relevant to your wallet. As apparently the Langerhans Dogecoin Wallet is a fork from Bitcoin Wallet for Android, this ...


2

The green dot in Bitcoin Wallet for Android represents the number of confirmations an incoming transaction has. Once the first slice appears, the transaction has its first confirmation; i.e. it was included in the blockchain. Additional slices will appear when succeeding blocks are found, AFAIR marking up to six confirmations. There should not be any issue ...


2

It appears that Bitcoin Wallet for Android uses the DefaultCoinSelector from bitcoinj. The DefaultCoinSelector sorts the available UTXO by diminishing age and value: value [satoshi] * age [confirmations] Should two UTXO compare as equal, larger value is preferred. The CoinSelection then picks from the front until the target is reached. Still trying to ...


2

The best way to restore a backup file is always to use the same app used for creating the backup. In other words, install the app again, then use Options > Safety > Restore wallet.


2

The Bitcoin Wallet App doesn't have the option to delete or hide transactions from the list.


2

Remove block for else if in that you have used useTor(), it doesnt need at all


2

Your question indicates some experience with bitcoin, so I am going to be very technical. You may want to look up "smart contracts" as keywords. In the bitcoin world we talk about checklocktimeverify and checksequenceverify, together with some multisig (as escrow service). There are many examples, e.g. here (this is basically what I posted in ...


2

It's a well known problem described here: https://github.com/lightningnetwork/lnd/issues/1347 LND team works on a fix here: https://github.com/lightningnetwork/lnd/pull/1595 Meanwhile i'd recommend to connect to Eclair based nodes to have receiving ability, such as the recommended ACINQ node.


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