30

If you're using Bitcoin Core just for your own personal use, you probably don't need the -txindex=1 option. But, if you're using Bitcoin core for development or blockchain analysis of some sort, you will need to set -txindex=1 to be able to get transactions data for any transaction in the blockchain. The tradeoff is just that keeping an index is slightly ...


14

By default -txindex=0 Bitcoin Core doesn't maintain any transaction-level data except for those in the mempool or relay set pertinent to addresses in your wallet pertinent to your "watch-only" addresses If "txindex" is set to true (1), Bitcoin Core maintains an index of all transactions that have ever happened, which you can query using the remote ...


12

The location of bitcoin.conf depends on your operating system: Windows XP             C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data\Bitcoin\bitcoin.conf Windows Vista, 7, 10C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Bitcoin    ...


8

You want to use 192.168.0.0/24. That's CIDR notation for 192.168.0.*.


7

That configuration parameter no longer has any effect because the CPU mining engine has been removed from the mainline client. Earlier versions of the client did have a built in miner and the gen parameter controlled if it ran in the background. Given the much higher difficulty today the developers felt it no longer served a purpose and would be confusing ...


6

Yes, this is by design. The notify action is run in the function BlockNotifyCallback (init.cpp), and you can see: static void BlockNotifyCallback(bool initialSync, const CBlockIndex *pBlockIndex) { if (initialSync || !pBlockIndex) return; // ... } The initialSync argument comes from the return value of IsInitialBlockDownload() (in validate....


6

It will by default use all CPU cores available. However, if the database cache is too small, your node will spend its time fetching and writing database entries from/to disk, rather than verification You can set the size of the database cache using a bitcoin.conf setting dbcache=N, where N is the number of megabytes of RAM.


5

As far as i know, you are running the bitcoind client as it should be run. You need to explicitly say that you want your bitcoind to be run as a daemon. try changing your server=1 configuration lines to this (your comment may have inadvertently messed with bitcoin... but i don't know that for any fact, just a hypothesis) here's your example modified # JSON-...


5

Yes, with -gen=1 on the command line or in the configuration file, bitcoind will use its built-in miner to search for blocks. It is inefficient, does not support pools, and does not use GPUs. It is only left as a reference and for testing, and will probably be removed completely soon.


4

More threads will not make your software run faster. Threads are used in order to be able to do more things concurrently, but not necessarily faster overall. Assume your internet connection allows you to download at 1 MiB/s, and you want to download 5 files of 200 MiB each. No matter what, you need to download 1000 MiB, which will take 1000 seconds. But you ...


3

walletnotify takes the supplied string and runs it as a command. If you want to make it request a URL, you should pass the URL to a command that can do that. On linux: walletnotify=curl 'http://localhost/blocknotify-update-deposit?trxhash='%s If there's an error while running the command, Bitcoin will append a message to debug.log. It should look like ...


3

The JSON-RPC API can be used by other programs to communicate with the Bitcoin client. That could include external mining programs, "e-commerce" software to automatically make and receive payments, or any other software that wants to interact with the Bitcoin network. It is true that you do not need this feature simply to solo mine using setgenerate true. ...


3

The official Bitcoin full node software always had the mining feature built in, and will probably always have. If you have the line gen=1 in your .conf file, then you will start confirming transactions when you open the wallet. Take a look at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Running_Bitcoin


3

The correct configuration parameter is: paytxfee=<amount>, where <amount>is the amount (fee) per kB to add to your outgoing txs


3

That format has been removed. Use rpcallowip=192.168.0.0/16 instead.


3

In addition, txindex=1 used to be required if you wanted to use LND (lightning network daemon). See https://github.com/lightningnetwork/lnd/pull/751


3

The configuration file is definitely in $HOME/.bitcoin/. If you cannot see it, the most likely explanation is that you have not created it. Just use your favorite text editor to do so. As far as I can tell, bitcoind -daemon will run without bitcoin.conf being present and you will still get the message 'Using config file /home/user/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf' in ...


3

If you installed Bitcoin Core on linux, the config file is most likely found in ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf Edit bitcoin.conf file and just add txindex=1 anywhere you like on a new line, just make sure it's not commented out.


3

Found the solution: rpcport needs to be in the [test] section Please update your original config file to read: testnet=1 server=1 daemon=1 txindex=1 rpcuser=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 onlynet=ipv4 zmqpubrawblock=tcp://127.0.0.1:28332 zmqpubrawtx=tcp://127.0.0.1:28333 [test] rpcport=19832 And restart the ...


3

So in Bitcoind you can define authentication via an rpc interface (remote procedure call). In the config file of Bitcoind which is usually located in ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf you can set the values for rpcuser=bitcoind_rpc_user_string rpcpass=bitcoind_rpc_password_string Obviously you should select other values than the ones in this answer / question. You ...


2

I would guess that that refers to your bitcoin.conf. There's platform-specific information on where to find it at: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Running_Bitcoin#Bitcoin.conf_Configuration_File


2

With a standard Bitcoin Core installation under Window 7, the data directory is located under: {User}\AppData\Roaming\Bitcoin The bitcoin.conf file containing the line "testnet=1" goes there. The usual way to create this file is with Notepad. Unfortunately, this app insists on giving the file the extension ".txt". This is, of course invisible by default. ...


2

Create a shortcut on your desktop (or somewhere) to: "C:\User\MYUSERNAME\Downloads\bitcoin-0.8.-win32\bitcoin-0.8.6-win32\bitcoin-qt.exe" -testnet and name it "Bitcoin-QT testnet"


2

In addition to the other answers, txindex=1 is required if you want to use your wallet with Counterparty. See the installation instructions at https://github.com/CounterpartyXCP/counterparty-lib


2

There's a difference between a software thread and a CPU thread. The number of threads that you are seeing is not the number of CPU threads that bitcoind is using. It is the number of software threads that it has created, which are different from CPU threads. You can't make the software create more software threads; that's not possible and not how the ...


2

If bitcoind stops, them you should have a look in your debug.log file. Enabling -txindex with an already initialised blockchain (not your first regtest start) requires a reindex. Either you start with -reindex-chainstate or you delete your <bitcoin-data-dir>/regtest folder


2

So sure enough Bitcoin Core seems to start faster after doing that. Is it a good idea? Or more specifically, what could go wrong? It must be the placebo effect that you are experiencing because assumevalid has no effect on this when the default values for the consistency checks are used (changed with parameters -checklevel and -checkblocks) There isn'...


2

keypoolsize only shows how many keys are currently in the keypool. It does not reflect the maximum size of the keypool. The keypool=<n> option does not automatically fill the keypool to that size, you will need to refill it by using keypoolrefill. If after keypoolrefill you still do not see a larger keypool, then that means your bitcoin.conf file is ...


1

You could use the invalidateblock RPC. Bitcoin will not bother checking validity of blocks past that an invalid block.


1

The rpc user/pass is only needed if you're planning to access the node via RPC. If you're running Armory on top of it, for example, that requires RPC and hence you would need it (Armory auto-creates the rpcuser/password for you, though). If you're running a node and don't need the RPC functionality, no, you don't need those parameters set.


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