2

Yes, you can sign with that. Hardware wallets don't care about your gap limit, they aren't deriving individual keys when you setup the wallet. Rather they just store the master private key (or the seed used to derive the master private key) and then derive the individual keys needed on-the-fly. So if you tell it to sign with the 999,999th key, by giving it ...


2

Your input txid output index is 5 bytes, when it should be 4 bytes. Just remove the extra 00 byte and the transaction will not pop an error. However, you might need to sign this transaction again as signature involves signing the entire serialized transaction as a message and by changing the txid outpoint you will change the message that is signed.


2

What you are referring to are stale blocks. Orphaned blocks are one for which the previous (parent) hash field points to an unknown block or to a block not yet processed by the local node. Since Bitcoin Core follows headers first approach, block headers are downloaded and validated first before downloading the block data. As a result, full nodes will never ...


2

which, as I understand it, makes some data (until 2017?) real without verification. You understand incorrectly. Firstly, the assumevalid blocks is updated at every major release, so it is at most a couple of months out of date for the most recent release. For Bitcoin Core 0.18.0, the assumevalid block is ...


1

You can use fundrawtransaction and specify a particular input to be used in the transaction. Bitcoin Core will then choose the rest of the inputs to meet your output amount automatically. You can also use lockunspent to prevent specific UTXOs from being selected for coin selection thereby limiting which UTXOs can be used. Then any time that coin selection ...


1

As Ugam Kamat commented: 20 in decimal is equal to 14 in hexadecimal (Community-Wiki answer to remove Q from unanswered list)


1

You are allocating far too much dbcache. If you allocate 4000 MB to the dbcache, you will use up all of your RAM and it will crash. Your operating system needs RAM, Bitcoin Core itself needs RAM outside of the dbcache. I would highly recommend that you do not set a dbcache at all as 4 GB is really not enough RAM to handle a larger dbcache, Bitcoin Core's ...


1

Or is is possible to allocate multiple cores(not threads) to JSON rpc No. The problem is not to do with thread or core allocation. Rather Bitcoin Core makes use of locks to keep the chain state consistent when multiple threads may access it. In this case, you will need to access the chain state to get transactions so multiple getrawtransaction calls cannot ...


1

The account API has been deprecated for a while, and was completely removed in Bitcoin Core 0.18.0. You should be using the new mutliwallet API, or handling account based labelling externally.


1

This is mentioned in the Bitcoin Core 0.17 (which introduced network sections) release notes: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/master/doc/release-notes/release-notes-0.17.0.md#configuration-sections-for-testnet-and-regtest. Certain options must be prefixed with a network, or they'll only apply to mainnet (addnode, connect, port, bind, rpcport, ...


1

You can't just give Bitcoin Core the redeemScript, it won't know what to do with it. The only valid thing to give it is an address, but you have not given it an address. You need to convert your redeemScript into a P2SH address first, then you give it that address. You can use the decodescript command to get both the p2sh and p2wsh addresses for your ...


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