4

bitcoin-cli attempts to read the credentials from $HOME/.bitcoin. Since user2 will have a different home directory, bitcoin-cli will not able to find the credentials. You can either symlink .bitcoin from user1's home directory to user2's, or alias bitcoin-cli for user2 to use -datadir=user1home/.bitcoin. You may need to play around with the read ...


2

That sounds like it's going out of memory and is killed by the system. Especially on a low-memory device like an RPi3 this seems very likely. For information on how to reduce bitcoind memory usage, see https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/master/doc/reduce-memory.md


2

Coming from this question, is there any comprehensive collection of what errors can each RPC command return? For example. Let's say I want to run getbestblockhash or getblockcount. I'm unsure about what errors to expect. I don't think that such documentation exists. You would have to read the source code for a particular RPC. Additionally, since some ...


2

It is supported according to the LND installation guide NOTE: The auth parameters rpcuser and rpcpass parameters can typically be determined by lnd for a bitcoind instance running under the same user, including when using cookie auth. In this case, you can exclude them from the lnd options entirely.


2

No. Block data is written (appended to) blk*.dat files whenever a block is received from the network (assuming things like PoW and a few other sanity checks pass). As blocks are received in parallel from multiple peers, their order on disk ends up being chaotic. Undo data is written when a block gets fully validated. As full validation requires validation ...


2

No, they’re completely incompatible.


1

To clarify, what you exported is a private key for an address. A wallet is a collection of addresses and their private keys. The amount that you think is associated with that address is most definitely not the actual amount. What has most likely happened is that you have made a transaction in the past which spent some of those coins and the remainder has ...


1

@PieterWuille is right, it is really not related to bitcoin but to ZeroMQ and docker. I look into the source code and bitcoin core uses zmq_bind( socket, bindingAddress ). For BindingAddress, I can change it to tcp://*:28332 because callers from another containers or from host would have different IPs, so the most convenient way is to set it to a range of ...


1

Most services run their own services which track the UTXOs that they need. They use Bitcoin Core as an edge node which forwards all of the valid blocks and transactions to their internal software that adds them all to a database. This could be a software based on insight or Abe or something homegrown. In this way, they don't need to implement consensus and ...


1

Most services operating large scale wallets only use Bitcoin Core for networking information, and maintain a separate utxo set for wallet purposes. There are many existing options to build a full utxo set that can be queried for arbitrary addresses, such as the insight project. Moreover, recent versions of Bitcoin Core come with the scantxoutset RPC call, ...


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