9

What makes you think that this isn't implemented? Block download is already multithreaded and blocks are downloaded out of order. Everything that can be verified in a block without requiring other blocks (such as the PoW matching the PoW stated in the block header, merkle root, etc.) are verified when the block is received. This all happens in separate ...


6

Just got help from someone at BitcoinTalk forum, who directed me to bitcoind 0.11.0 changelog (Which pruning was introduced/implemented for the first time in bitcoind) As indicated there, Block pruning deletes raw block & undo data: ... there are four types of data related to the blockchain in the bitcoin system: the raw blocks as received over the ...


5

API providers, such as Blockchain.com, are not querying a node to answer your queries to them usually. For the handful of providers that actually do offer a proxy service to a bitcoin node, they usually run several of them and spread out incoming queries so that no single node is answering a huge number. They extract the information they need and store it ...


5

You are the victim of a scam by criminal conmen. You cannot recover your money. The bitcoin system does not allow for cancellations, reversals or refunds of transactions where payments were made due to fraud. The only person who can return your money is the person who you gave it to. Criminals almost never voluntarily return what they stole. The bitcoin ...


4

bitcoin-cli attempts to read the credentials from $HOME/.bitcoin. Since user2 will have a different home directory, bitcoin-cli will not able to find the credentials. You can either symlink .bitcoin from user1's home directory to user2's, or alias bitcoin-cli for user2 to use -datadir=user1home/.bitcoin. You may need to play around with the read ...


4

There is no need to resolve anything - some miners create arbitrary versions to attempt to speed up the mining process, as it gives them an additional field in the block block header to alter without having to recalculate the merkle root and other fields. This is harmless, provided they aren't producing invalid blocks for version 2, in which case the block ...


4

Unless explicitly told otherwise, the datadir is always placed in /home/$USER/.bitcoin, there is no logic for automatically using any location other than this. The configuration file is always in the data directory as bitcoin.conf.


4

You cannot. There have been both changes to the P2P protocol that prevent this, and changes to the way that nodes are discovered. The method which 0.1.0 discovered new nodes was by joining the #bitcoin channel on freenode. Your IP address would be encoded in a certain way and that would be the IRC nick for your node. However this has long since been removed ...


3

How can they list the unspent transactions and the current amount of an address which "is not in their wallet"? Block explorer sites maintain a separate database of information which is built by continuously scanning the Bitcoin blockchain. If block explorer sites see a standard locking script in the outputs of the transactions, they scrape the addresses ...


3

libbitcoin is not, and was never a part of Bitcoin Core. Both are standalone implementations of the Bitcoin protocol. Bitcoin Core, in its build process, will create a number of files named "libbitcoin_...". These are just locally generated files that are unrelated to the libbitcoin project. Bitcoin Core does not have any files with the "hpp" extension. So ...


3

Although certain releases perform database upgrades, the upgrade is handled by the bitcoind binary - updating a node only requires changing the binary, regardless of whether you downloaded a prebuilt one or compiled it from source. If any additional changes to the bitcoin data are required, the updated bitcoind will perform them when it starts. If you are ...


3

The provided approach is correct. A binary itself does not handle any requests. When you run bitcoind with separate instances of the config and data directories, the system will create multiple instances of the bitcoind program to execute. Each of these instances is a fully independent bitcoin node, and has no relation to any other instance running on that ...


3

When you don't explicitly specify any RPC credentials, bitcoind will autogenerate them for you and store the password in the $DATADIR/.cookie file. You can then use the username __cookie__ along with the password from that file.


3

No. Block data is written (appended to) blk*.dat files whenever a block is received from the network (assuming things like PoW and a few other sanity checks pass). As blocks are received in parallel from multiple peers, their order on disk ends up being chaotic. Undo data is written when a block gets fully validated. As full validation requires validation ...


3

generate was deprecated and removed in favor of generatetoaddress.


3

No, due to different reasons. First, the network is always in flux, nodes are appearing and disappearing, and connections are even more dynamic, so even if there were an API you could use to ask a node for its connections, that information would be outdated quickly. Second, privacy is part of the reason why crypto currencies exist. Divulging the list of ...


3

It refers to actual disk space. RAM is memory, not storage. The term "disk space" is very specific. Then a while later this: [2020-01-20T09:05:59Z Reindexing finished] But bitcoind continued grinding on... Well then what is all this? :: Your node was not fully synced, so after it finished reindexing the blocks on disk, it continued to download ...


3

No, it would not. --reindex only handles the data that is stored on disk. Blocks are stored in the order that they are received, which is what brought you to your current view of the blockchain. So all that would happen is that you end up at that same state. Switching to another blockchain fork requires your node to be aware of it, so you need to have ...


3

This is not possible, and is a common scam. The approach these scammers take is to publish a video or telegram message, like the one you've found, claiming to be able to do the impossible. They then ask you to contact them. Once you contact them, they will provide you with a software that is apparently able to do this. Some of them may charge you for the ...


3

The problem is that your wallet version is extremely old - it predates support for compressed public keys (which was added in v0.6.0, released in March 2012). As segwit addresses require compressed public keys, Bitcoin Core is failing with the keys you have, and defaulting to legacy addresses instead. The solution is restart with -upgradewallet (just once), ...


3

A will be kicked out of the mempool when that block is received, and getrawtransaction will subsequently fail for it.


3

Since PSBTs can be fairly large, I wanted to use an encoding that compressed better than hex and was already in use and implemented by many clients. Base64 was already in use by other clients as signed messages also uses Base64. It also works well with command line without escaping or quoting so it seemed like a good choice.


3

Your client will make use of transactions it relays to build an estimation : by caching it (and the block height) when it first sees it it will we able to tell how much time (# of blocks) it took for it to be confirmed. To build a reliable estimation, it will fill "buckets" (basically, a pack of transactions sharing a common characteristic) according to the ...


3

The memory pool (mempool) is not limited to a specific transaction count, but limited by the amount of data the deserialized transactions take up in the node's memory. The default memory pool limit is 300 MB. The limit can be configured by passing -maxmempool <n> where the n is the number of megabytes allowed.


3

You cannot set an absolute fee, however you can use the settxfee RPC to set the fee rate for the wallet before you make the transaction. Note that this isn't persisted in the wallet and is only held in memory, so you will need to do it again if you restart Bitcoin Core or reload the wallet. In the next major release of Bitcoin Core, version 0.21, you will ...


2

Is bitcoin-cli available? If so, bitcoin-cli stop instead of pkill $BITCOIND_PID. My own preference is to add sleep 2 following a stop, as I've experienced issues immediately restarting the stopped daemon where it behaves like a child thread hasn't finished cleaning up before the parent exits. That may not be what's happening - I've not investigated that ...


2

gettransaction is a wallet RPC. It only works for transactions your wallet knows about. Presumably this is not the case for a transaction from 2013. getrawtransaction is a node RPC. It works for all transactions, but needs help to find them. One possibility is to enable the transaction index (put txindex=1 in bitcoin.conf, or -txindex on the bitcoind ...


2

Yes. You always have two accounts on LND (ZAP interfaces over rpc with your self hosted lnd node). One account is your lightning wallet where channel management is done, and the other is your on chain wallet. Depending on where your balance is there are different processes for moving the balance to your on chain wallet (which is what I assume you want). ...


2

Turns out my node had auto-banned localhost (127.0.0.1) at some point. As a result bitcoind was rejecting all incoming connections from the tor service, including my friend's attempts. I removed the ban and he is able to connect.


2

1) If I only backup that extended private masterkey, would I be able to recreate the wallet entirely in case my application crashes? Or do I really need to backup the wallet file itself? (Let's say I do not import addresses that were not generated by bitcoind itself.) No. Bitcoin Core does not allow your to create a wallet from the master private key. There ...


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