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I have a Bitcoin full node perfectly running on my raspberry pi 3B (of course, without mining). The biggest constraint in the installation of bitcoin core (though there are also other implementation of Bitcoin protocol) is the initial blockchain download, because your machine need to verify each and every single transaction inside every block from the ...


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Coming from this question, is there any comprehensive collection of what errors can each RPC command return? For example. Let's say I want to run getbestblockhash or getblockcount. I'm unsure about what errors to expect. I don't think that such documentation exists. You would have to read the source code for a particular RPC. Additionally, since some ...


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Most services run their own services which track the UTXOs that they need. They use Bitcoin Core as an edge node which forwards all of the valid blocks and transactions to their internal software that adds them all to a database. This could be a software based on insight or Abe or something homegrown. In this way, they don't need to implement consensus and ...


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Most services operating large scale wallets only use Bitcoin Core for networking information, and maintain a separate utxo set for wallet purposes. There are many existing options to build a full utxo set that can be queried for arbitrary addresses, such as the insight project. Moreover, recent versions of Bitcoin Core come with the scantxoutset RPC call, ...


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Speaking as a formal wallet engineer, what we did back then, Once in a while, we would batch generate lots of bitcoin addresses and import them into bitcoind. Can't speak for ALL applications, for us, we let bitcoind manage all its UTXO set. Depending on the situation, if the address is newly generated by you, then no, you have to import it first because, ...


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That sounds like it's going out of memory and is killed by the system. Especially on a low-memory device like an RPi3 this seems very likely. For information on how to reduce bitcoind memory usage, see https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/master/doc/reduce-memory.md


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bitcoin-cli attempts to read the credentials from $HOME/.bitcoin. Since user2 will have a different home directory, bitcoin-cli will not able to find the credentials. You can either symlink .bitcoin from user1's home directory to user2's, or alias bitcoin-cli for user2 to use -datadir=user1home/.bitcoin. You may need to play around with the read ...


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No, there is no support for this. It is not an interface which uses the RPC interface, it has much deeper access within the wallet than RPC provides.


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When you don't explicitly specify any RPC credentials, bitcoind will autogenerate them for you and store the password in the $DATADIR/.cookie file. You can then use the username __cookie__ along with the password from that file.


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API providers, such as Blockchain.com, are not querying a node to answer your queries to them usually. For the handful of providers that actually do offer a proxy service to a bitcoin node, they usually run several of them and spread out incoming queries so that no single node is answering a huge number. They extract the information they need and store it ...


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It look like a permission read/write error, if you are sure about the bitcoin binary you are using, then try to run your command with sudo at the begining of it or try a sudo chmod 711 /etc/systemd/system/bitcoind.service which will give the proper right to the file you want to use.


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It depends on your specific data directory. Bitcoin Core uses a LevelDB database for the index and LevelDB handles the exact storage format and files of the database. This can be different for every data directory. There is no particular file that that record is stored in that Bitcoin Core knows.


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Root cause. The root cause of the problem is default settings in docker container. More precisely, network settings mode which has bridge mode by default. In bridge mode all incoming connections are seen from inside docker container as coming from the same IP address (which is 172.17.0.1). There are multiple hard forks out there so a foreign node running ...


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You're looking for walletnotify setting in bitcoin.conf It will call the specified script for every transaction received for your own wallets. walletnotify=/some/path/mywalletscript.py Here mywalletscript.py will handle the JSON data passed into it. Here is a sample walletnotify implementation including database access. It's a bit dated but should give ...


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The problem is that you apply wrong options values for -rpcallowip and -rpcbind. -rpcbind=127.0.0.1 This one tells bitcoind to bind RCP server to 127.0.0.1(localhost). That means it will be available from the same host only. -rpcallowip=0.0.0.0/24 0.0.0.0/24 means Class C network with IP address range 0.0.0.1 - 0.0.0.254 The correct options in your case ...


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Finally,I create a proxy to solve it. I am not sure if there is a risk of this code. https://gist.github.com/toknT/195dc5bf6d5cb6c1cb89cd424ee783bf var httpProxy = require('http-proxy'); const rpcPort = process.env.RPC_PORT; const exportPort = process.env.EXPORT_PORT; httpProxy.createProxyServer({ target: `http://127.0.0.1:${rpcPort}` }).listen(exportPort)...


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Try to allow RPC calls on particular IP or whitelist all IP's, for example: rpcallowip=0.0.0.0/0 Plus try to check debug.log if the connection appeared on daemon it should report. If not, probably firewall issues on a system itself.


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If I understand your question, your latency compared to blockchain.info is motivated to the blockchain.ifo use the node distributed to the world and you have only the one node. I have read this reasearch where write this In any peer-to-peer system, dierent nodes will receive thesame data at different times. Blockchain.info uses a geographi-...


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You can unload the wallet using unloadwallet and then delete the wallet file.


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In my implementation the java URL cannot be built with the structure http://username:pass@server:port


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