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2

The problem is that you have 0 connections. Your node isn't connecting to other nodes on the network. It is able to connect to the DNS seeders and get node IPs to connect to, but something is preventing it from making the actual connection itself. Make sure there isn't something preventing your node from making outbound connections to port 8333. This could ...


0

You can use btcposbal2csv.py script to export the list to CSV. To get current addresses with positive balance, let the full node client sync with the network. Stop the bitcoin-core client before running this utility. If you not stop the client, the database might get corrupted. Then run this program with path to chainstate directory (usually $HOME/.bitcoin/...


4

You cannot. There have been both changes to the P2P protocol that prevent this, and changes to the way that nodes are discovered. The method which 0.1.0 discovered new nodes was by joining the #bitcoin channel on freenode. Your IP address would be encoded in a certain way and that would be the IRC nick for your node. However this has long since been removed ...


2

I was able to start -testnet in deprecated mode to test my script like this: bitcoind -testnet -deprecatedrpc=signrawtransaction


1

Your transaction was mined in block 1773944. Your node has only synced up to block 626786. Once your node has synced block 1773944, you should be able to see the transaction.


4

You are the victim of a scam by criminal conmen. You cannot recover your money. The bitcoin system does not allow for cancellations, reversals or refunds of transactions where payments were made due to fraud. The only person who can return your money is the person who you gave it to. Criminals almost never voluntarily return what they stole. The bitcoin ...


0

I encountered this error message when I have not started bitcoind.exe. Starting bitcoind.exe solved the problem.


3

The memory pool (mempool) is not limited to a specific transaction count, but limited by the amount of data the deserialized transactions take up in the node's memory. The default memory pool limit is 300 MB. The limit can be configured by passing -maxmempool <n> where the n is the number of megabytes allowed.


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The default mempool limit is 100MB. Not limiting at all would be a significant denial of service risk. Raising the limit will increase the performance of your node in some situations, lowering it will reduce the resource usage by a small amount.


3

Your client will make use of transactions it relays to build an estimation : by caching it (and the block height) when it first sees it it will we able to tell how much time (# of blocks) it took for it to be confirmed. To build a reliable estimation, it will fill "buckets" (basically, a pack of transactions sharing a common characteristic) according to the ...


1

For future reference, thought I'd respond to my original question with what I've found out to this point. Haven't fully answered the original question yet but the approach I'm using at the moment to toggle between wallets is: bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet="filename" [command] Any other thoughts on best practices would be great!


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