7

The time to produce the next block is completely unaffected by the number of unconfirmed transactions. The time is generally expected to follow a Poisson distribution as explained in answers to a related question. I'm no statistician so what follows may be nonsense: A Poisson distribution with a lambda of 6 shown as a probability mass looks like this So in ...


5

Cryddit on Bitcointalk posted some source code that Satoshi supposedly emailed to him. This code contains a target interval of 15 minutes rather than 10. It is in https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=382374.msg4108739#msg4108739. Search for nTargetSpacing.


5

Blocks have timestamps, but they are not very accurate. The protocol rules only (roughly) require them to not be more than 1 hour in the past and not more than 2 hours in the future. At least historically, miners have used this flexibility, effectively turning part of the timestamp as an additional nonce field. I don't know if this is still common practice. ...


2

Are there any "slow" sidechains? Softchains fit this definition. Softchains are a type of sidechain that are verified by all mainchain users in a slow but extremely resource-efficient way, by only validating the blocks for which forks occur. It's slow, because you can't assume these forks will occur right away. People who want to actively use the ...


2

Shorter block times hurt decentralization because they hurt smaller mining pools because smaller mining pools depend on orphaning rate more because orphaning rate depends on the number of competing blocks in unit time since network connection quality becomes more important with higher orphaning rate and of competing blocks, the larger miner with better ...


2

as the popularity of bitcoin keeps on increasing, wouldn't more transactions take place daily? Yes, scaling of Bitcoin is a recognised issue. For people who use Bitcoin as a currency, as its creators intended, the solution is mostly off-chain payment systems such as the Lightning network. For speculators and day traders who treat Bitcoin as nothing other ...


1

It was lowest since 2011 according to chart shared in a tweet thread: But it was not lowest overall because there were fewer blocks mined in 24h a few times in 2009.


1

One of the great challenges there is that the security vs time tradeoff for a given block interval depends on network parameters that are hard to observe and change over time. If you use too long an interblock interval, nothing bad happens-- security grows slightly slower. If you use a somewhat too short interval security is significantly damaged. The ...


1

You can get an overview of the recent blocks by visiting a "block explorer" such as e.g. blockstream.info or blockchair.com. These usually report the timestamps of blocks as seen in the screenshot below. Note that the timestamps in Bitcoin blocks are picked by the block's author and may diverge from the actual time the block was found. via ...


1

Better Late than Never. I was asking myself the same question...I thought the hash rate of the network came from Full Nodes observation on Miners...I was wrong. I was looking for this answer on Bitcoin.org, but it's on Blockchain website: https://www.blockchain.com/charts/hash-rate. Look at the methodology at the bottom of the page. Formula is Hash rate = (...


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