4

Exodus does not have a copy of the blockchain locally, instead it relies on a central server for fetching blockchain data.


3

This is a known issue and a bug with APFS. This will be fixed in the next version of Bitcoin Core.


3

You're looking for Freenet, a p2p plataform which is only different from your idea in the fact that, to avoid wasting disk space, Freenet deletes old and unpopular content.


3

you might be interested to know that the bitcoin blockchain can already be used to store arbitrary data. for example the original whitepaper pdf that satoshi wrote explaining how bitcoin works has actually been uploaded to the blockchain. it was done using 948 outputs in a single transaction for a fee of 0.596175 btc ~ US$143.02 at the time i'm writing this. ...


2

Yes, it's absolutely still possible; nothing has changed to prevent it. It's not clear how you even could if you wanted to; because of the consensus requirement, you would need some universally agreed, computer-testable standards as to what sort of data was unacceptable. Any such standard would surely be extremely easy to circumvent. Anyone can insert 80 ...


2

It is still possible to embed data into the blockchain, and it is actually fairly trivial. But don't do it. It is rude and detrimental to the network as it takes up resources to host your random data on all full nodes in the network. The polite way to do it is to create an OP_RETURN output, but that only allows up to 80 bytes of data. The impolite way is to ...


2

Storing data on the blockchain is frowned upon. Since the blockchain is replicated on all non-pruned full nodes and downloaded by all full nodes, thousands of people must spend the extra resources to download and host your data on their machines for essentially eternity. This costs money and disk space while also taking up valuable block space that would ...


2

The balance is calculated from the UTXO set where unspent outputs belong to the address in question. Most block explorers will enable the transaction index, parse the historical and live data, and dump it into a database that runs on top of bitcoin to track additional statistics. As you can imagine this requires a lot more disk storage, but it makes things ...


2

@amacilin's answer pretty much nailed it. But I wanted to counter a few such assertions /r/Bitcoin often makes about decentralised being better than centralised. Recently someone said something to the effect of "Blockchain based storage/websites is the answer to the centralised server solutions, which have been around forever" The thing is, centralised ...


2

Nobody will waste his disk space for storing blockchain. Nobody will spend money for mining blocks. It will be very easy and very cheap for dishonest person to "doublespend" such currency.


2

Chain accepts parameter db, which can have multiple backends. By default it will be stored in memory. So this tip is coming from memory. If you want to store it to File(For example full node stores it in PREFIX/chain) you need to pass db with backend(ldb for example) and specify either prefix or location. prefix stands for general directory where chain and ...


1

Blockchain: Chain of blocks +++++----------++++---------++++++---------+++++++ Who creates the blocks? Miners Who validates, saves and relay these blocks? Full nodes https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/103172/ Different full node implementations for Bitcoin: Core, btcd, bcoin, gocoin, libbitcoin, knots, etc. Database used by Bitcoin Core: Bitcoin Core ...


1

where is the actual data stored? Each full node on the network will download and validate the blockchain history, it will request and receive this data from other full node peers. Each node does not necessarily have to keep that data after validating it though, it can choose to 'prune' data that is not relevant to the user's wallet. For e.g. bitcoin as of ...


1

You're looking for validation.h and its corresponding .cpp source file. You should start at CChainState::ActivateBestChain. This subroutine calls CChainState::ActivateBestChainStep which runs the logic you're interested in - stepping one by one of the blocks, cleaning up and reorg'ing from lowest to highest PoW. First, ActivateBestChainStep walks the ...


1

A Bitcoin address consists of a 1-byte version, a 20-byte payload (normally the RIPEMD-160 hash of a public key or script), and a 4-byte checksum, all encoded alphanumerically in base58. This is called Base58Check. You can see the specific details here, and there are many ready-made implementations in various languages. In your case, the version byte ...


1

Both Bitcoin and IPFS have a p2p messaging protocol where peers can request and offer public data resources to each other. Saving Data in the Bitcoin Blockchain The Bitcoin p2p layer is quite simple and simply allows Bitcoin nodes to gossip/propagate new transactions and valid blocks which extend the chain. Bitcoin nodes take these public data resources (...


1

How does IPFS use Blockchain https://ipfs.io/#how says Blockchains IPFS and the Blockchain are a perfect match! You can address large amounts of data with IPFS, and place the immutable, permanent IPFS links into a blockchain transaction. This timestamps and secures your content, without having to put the data on the chain itself. So yes, IPFS is separate ...


1

In Bitcoin, you can use an OP_RETURN output to encode arbitrary data into a transaction output. But there are also ways to do that without actually explicitly saying something is arbitrary data. For example, you could cut up the data into 32 byte slices and claim it is a public key. To an outside observer, it very well could be a public key. So then the ...


1

This is an issue of inodes, a feature mainly in Unix filesystems (like ext4) which is a fixed-size table storing metadata of all files on the partition. When the partition is created, a fixed number of inodes is created. On my 500GB drive using the default ext4 from Ubuntu, I have 27 million inodes (this can be checked using df -i if you're on Linux), many ...


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