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Accuracy not guaranteed Blockchain.info Wallets are json files. The json file is encrypted using AES (crypto-js) before the browsers asks that it be stored on the server. The wallet file is embedded in the login page as a html data attribute, the browser decrypts the file with the provided password and extracts a list of private keys and addresses. The ...


6

My Wallet's warning for watch-only addresses ("You will not be able to send bitcoins from this address without later providing the private key") can be a bit confusing. It's possible to specify an address and watch it. And it's possible to import a private key to be able to use the associated address as if it was generated with the My Wallet client. But ...


5

I mostly detailed the various encryption schemes used in version 1 wallets over here: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1012475.msg11105755#msg11105755 Incidentally, it's not trivial to create such a wallet any longer, now that the default is version 2. It is easy to convert a version 1 wallet into version 2: just change the iteration count under ...


4

Is exchanging bitcoins with money from other people the only way I can withdraw my money into my bank account?? Yes, it's the only way. You can't "withdraw" bitcoins into your bank account, any more than you could "withdraw" a car into your bank account. You have to sell them in exchange for money, and then you can deposit the money in your bank account. ...


4

Miner has to supply the Bitcoin address for block reward. Then, when the block is mined, the special "credit" transaction is permanently stored in found block, creating given amount (25 BTC, was 50 BTC) to given address. Some pools (Eligius or P2Pool) use this feature and create a lot of credit transactions, so that when block is found, all participants ...


3

First - you didn't specify if you use Bitcoin Core or any other program for maintaining your wallet, so the answer below presumes you used Bitcoin Core. The short version: it stores all of its data in %AppData%\Bitcoin This folder usually translates to C:\users\\AppData\Bitcoin Underneath that folder you will find there the 'wallet.dat' file. This is the ...


3

If you rely on bitcoind and JSON-RPC API you could try launching daemon with -walletnotify option. bitcoind -daemon -waletnotify="process-txn.sh %s" This will call process-txn.sh with transaction id on the input. Then you can query the daemon for transaction details.


3

As someone that has implemented a small eWallet, I suppose I can answer this question from my perspective. An implementation of an eWallet is fairly simple. Using the official API makes everything come down to issuing correct JSON RPC calls. You generally have a bitcoind instance running on a server, along with your website front. The main problem is making ...


3

blockchain doesn't record on their server any private key, or any key at all; or, they do, but they are encrypted and they can't access them, only you can "watch only" addresses are public keys only anyway


2

When creating a block, the first transaction in a block is always a coinbase transaction (a transaction with input of 0). In this transaction, the miner specifies output just like in a normal transaction - destination address, amount and so forth. This transaction is treated more or less just like every other transaction by the clients - it can be spent and ...


2

As I read here Google does not allow 3th party merchanting services: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/10217727/apple-android-3rd-party-merchant-services I'm quite sure that Apple wouldn't allow them either. Although, by law, Bitcoin is not considered as a payment, since law does not recognize Bitcoin as a currency. So by the rules i don't think they ...


2

You can fork Bitcoin Wallet, an SPV implementation of the Bitcoin protocol: https://github.com/schildbach/bitcoin-wallet It's GPL licensed.


2

1) Blockchain.info was down for a few moments in recent days - please re-check it's availability. 2) Blockchain.info sends an email confirmation with your wallet's "Identifier". This is your login/username. Try searching your email for "blockchain" and see if you have that email. Subject: Welcome To My Wallet Body: This email contains important ...


2

There is no "the" wallet app. Various development teams have produced wallet software. Some are only for certain desktop or phone platforms, and some are multiplatform. You can find a list here. Some support Windows Phone. As you have a Bitcoin Core related tag, there are no plans for creating a version for Windows Phone (nor for any other mobile platform)....


2

Unfortunately, once the transaction is confirmed on the blockchain there is no way to retreive the funds and, that I know of, there is no way to zap the pending transaction from the distributed mempool, nor can I imagine a way. The transaction will likely be confirmed in due course. Even if Blockchain.com zap the tx locally and the Bitcoin show up again in ...


2

Is it possible to recover my money? No, Bitcoin transactions are irreversible. You could try to contact the other party and either ask about the delay or request a refund. If you believe the other party is committing a fraud, you can report the problem to your local police - but for small amounts it is unlikely that any action can be taken.


2

I was told once I login to change my password It is important you understand why this is a trick intended to deceive you. Wallets don't contain bitcoin. Wallets contain a "private key" - it is this private key that gives you control over an amount of bitcoin. The person who creates a wallet can copy this private key and use it to make a new wallet that ...


2

This is almost certainly a scam. Never ever give anyone anything else than an address (things that start with 1..., 3..., or bc1...). If they ask for anything else, this is very suspcious. A common scam is to make you create a wallet, have them add "watching" coins to it which are never yours but show up as balance, and then tell you you need to add more ...


1

Yes, it's definitely a scam. As the old adage goes, "if it is too good to be true, it is too good to be true". The Bitcoin wallet application that you are using is governed by a seed words and not the user ID/password for the online login. So, in your case the attacker created this wallet for you, noted down the seed words and told you to login. Now, if you ...


1

There is a step-by-step guide here and you can also test it on this site. You can also use this python library. import os os.environ['CRYPTOTOOLS_NETWORK'] = 'test' from btctools import PublicKey >>> pub = Publickey.from_hex('yourpubkeyhere') >>> pub.to_address('P2PKH') 'mp9CpH3h25m7FZqsPBf2UfU9Gm4u41j9Eg'


1

You're users are not in control of the private keys, so you do not need to lock them via the Bitcoin protocol. This is just a simple permission feature you should build into your system using a database. If a user "buys from you" then update a field in your database for that user, for example the database field could be called locked and then you would have ...


1

What you really do is to send bitcoins (with a phone app, in this case) to a bitcoin address. So, strictly speaking, Blockchain or Coinbase, if we consider only the send/receive function, are providing you something it's already yours, meaninf that a wallet with its addresses and the send and receive functions are at your disposal for free on the bitcoin ...


1

Use this: %.%.%.% It mentions this in the IP Whitelist section, found in Account settings then IP Restrictions.


1

I have built an open source service that does exactly this. Every time a new address is generated, it's associated with an account in a database. The Bitcoin client is running using the optional -walletnotify command to notify the database about the new transaction. When the database receives a new transaction, the account associated with that address can be ...


1

If someone wishes to share their work with me, I am grateful. But I do not expect that others are obligated to share their work.


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