3

Blockcypher API shows only the example of how to compose a transaction with a single input, therefore, it might look like the array of addresses will do the job, but no. If you'll do this by passing addresses into one array of inputs: curl -d '{"inputs":[{"addresses":["addr1", "addr2"]}],"outputs":[{"...


2

Is the difference that for "Sign Message", first a digest is created, which is then signed, while for "Sign Transaction" (in the meaning written above), the input is already a digest, so it shouldn't be hashed again? No. It has nothing to do with the hashing. Furthermore, the input is not already a digest, it must be hashed before signing. Both the message ...


2

You are on the right track. The address is derived correctly, it is just not encoded with the right version. You need to add the testnet network version to the btc.payments.p2pkh call as well. Something like this should work: console.log(btc.payments.p2pkh({pubkey, network: btc.networks.testnet}).address); The address should then start with m... instead ...


1

Disclaimer: I have not tried this, I just glanced at the API documentation. H/T to eirlis for providing the correct syntax. As the API documentation for Creating Transactions specifies, you provide the addresses that you received your funds to in the inputs parameter. The API documentation has this example using curl: curl -d '{"inputs":[{"...


1

Regarding your title, without knowing the private key, no one can withdraw your BTC, that's for sure. First of all, I would argue it's a bad idea to use a third-party online service to generate and manage your keys. I went to check the blockcypher site, it seemed legit. Did you spend your coins? If so, the money may be moved to a new address because the ...


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