19

Bitcoin Cash block explorers are (sorted by usefulness and features): ✯ BlockTrail: www.blocktrail.com/BCC ✯ BlockChair: blockchair.com/bitcoin-cash/blocks ✯ BTC.com: bch.btc.com ✯ ViaBTC: www.viabtc.com ✯ Bitcoin.com: explorer.bitcoin.com *✯Coin Dance: cash.coin.dance/blocks ✯ BitInfoCharts: bitinfocharts.com/bitcoin%20cash/ ✯ BitBox: explore.bitbox.earth ...


8

bitcoind doesn't give you a way to query this, but by looking at the files it writes to disk, we can build our own tools that let us look at this. One such tool is Abe, and this is how you use it: Installation (Ubuntu) I'm assuming you have the standard bitcoin client running already. Download Abe. Unpack it, and run python setup.py install Go into abe....


7

Blockchair announced support for Bech32 addresses last month. Please consult this wiki page for latest information on Blockexplorers supporting Bech32 addresses


6

blk.dat files contain blocks data in raw format. Also a leveldb index is maintained that helps to quickly lookup blocks/utxo. You can find the details here and here. Blockexplorers will not directly read these files. It is not safe for multiple process to access leveldb at the same time (blockexplorer and bitcoin node process). Here is a brief summary of ...


6

Given the tags you're setting on your question, I believe you're confusing currencies, wallets, and explorers. Bitcoin (BTC) and Bitcoin Cash (BCH) are currencies with an associated blockchain. Wallet/node software is what you use to interact with that currency. Software that interacts with BTC includes Bitcoin Core, Bitcoin Knots, btcd, Electrum, ...


5

Short answer: Yes, this is probably a bug in the block explorer. blockexplorer.com shows a positive balance. Some of the transactions shown there are "strange" (they presumably have non-standard scripts which someone was experimenting with), and this probably is tripping up the biteasy explorer. Note that the notion of "balance" of an address only really ...


5

I am actually working on doing this myself for a project, like the above poster said you can use the bitcoind API. To get the information on addresses you don't own the commands "getrecievedbyaddress" and so on wont work. You will need to work your way through the blockchain which can take a long time and i would not recommend doing it manually. Here is ...


5

Download Litecoin Core, install it, and start it with the -testnet option. I'm aware of two Litecoin testnet explorers: http://testnet.litecointools.com/ https://chain.so/testnet/ltc


5

You need to differentiate between the website's wallet (Blockchain.info-wallet) and the blockchain itself. You are allowed (by the bitcoin protocol) to make as many transactions per adress as you want. But wallets try to make it as comfortable as possible for you and use one adress only one time so that you are acting as pseudonymously as possible. You ...


4

You are trying to cross domains. Look into jsonp for that: https://github.com/jaubourg/jquery-jsonp


4

Public Bitcoin inspection services like BlockExplorer and BlockChain.info work almost exactly like the regular Bitcoin client. They operate as a node in the Bitcoin network and so, like all other nodes, store the complete block chain. This block chain consists of all transactions ever made and are used to calculate the balance of an address. Just like ...


4

I managed to point Abe to regtest just by using datadir=/home/$USER/.bitcoin/regtest in the config file and following the official instructions.


4

This transaction is a Pay-to-pubkey transaction, so there is no OP_DUP and no OP_HASH160. When validating an input, you first need to find the scriptPubKey of the output that this input spends from. The first input of your transaction spends from the first output of https://blockchain.info/tx/ff3dc8b461305acc5900d31602f2dafebfc406e5b050b14a352294f0965e0bf6. ...


3

Are you looking for 'bare multisig' transactions by BIP-11? Have a look here: https://webbtc.com/stats and here: https://webbtc.com/scripts/multisig Or may be you are interested in BIP-16 mostly used for multisig? Take this link: http://p2sh.info


3

Because it's possible to only partially sign a transaction (for example only one input) and then give that unfinished transaction to another party, who can then finish the transaction with their signature (for another input). Parties do not need to reveal their private keys to each other at all. Only after all parties signed can the transaction be sent to ...


3

Their definitions of 'total received' differ in that blockchain.info does not count change outputs as an amount 'received', whereas most other explorers do (since there is no way in general to determine if an output is really change or not, unless change is sent back to the sending address, which is the case for blockchain.info wallets). See this related ...


3

Yeah, that's how they work. For example, blockexplorer.com gets blocks from Bitcoin Core via JSON-RPC, gathers interesting chunks of data, and puts this data into a SQL database for easy access later. The code for this is only ~300 lines long (though it's very messy). Other block explorers work similarly. In fact, Bitcoin Core itself works something like ...


3

The latter address does not show up in google because it has not been used for a transaction yet. Once someone sends money to it, it will show up. It's possible that we'll be able to create systems in the future that don't have this problem, but don't hold your breath.


3

There is no guarantee that a transaction propagates through the network at all. Blockexplorers can only show transactions that they see. They're often configured in a way that will make them be more likely to see transactions, however.


3

After more googling I found this one: https://bitinfocharts.com/bitcoin%20gold/ It displays the correct BTG balances for my addresses at least


3

There is no need to buy any data, and if someone is offering to sell you block headers, then you are being scammed. The Bitcoin network protocol supports transmitting just block headers. So you can just use or create a software which can speak the Bitcoin network protocol and download just the block headers. The getheaders message is what you need in order ...


3

Blockchain.info has an interesting pie-chart showing the origin of blocks. On that page, they specifically note: A large portion of Unknown blocks does not mean an attack on the network, it simply means we have been unable to determine the origin. Blocks do not need to contain any identifying factors. The miner can choose to provide a script in the ...


2

See How to calculate a hash of a Tx? . The hash that serves as the ID of the transaction is not the same hash that is used for signing.


2

BlockCypher is adding support for Litecoin, we're currently downloading the LTC block chain and will put it out next week. All the Bitcoin APIs will work in the same way for Litecoin.


2

There has been discussion about this particular transaction before on reddit. This is clearly not a valid transaction and was probably used to store data on the blockchain before OP_RETURN. Why was it relayed? It may not have been. There's a very easy way to get a transaction like this included and it's by submitting the transaction directly to a mining ...


2

Check to see how many outputs total for the tx using .length and then do a for loop and run through every output for each transaction. Use an if statement to check if that particular output has your desired address in the 'addr' field. If it does match then print that value to the screen. I made a fiddle that I think should work, I didn't test it though... ...


2

Bitpay's bitcore-node project uses the same datadirectory as Bitcoin Core. You can see this in their sample configuration in their README: var configuration = { datadir: '~/.bitcoin', network: 'testnet' }; As such, the you can see: What are the keys used in the blockchain levelDB (ie what are the key:value pairs)? for information on what is in this ...


2

You can find stats on P2SH here: http://p2sh.info/dashboard/db/p2sh-statistics "Pay to script hash Pay to script hash (P2SH) transactions were standardised in BIP 16. They allow transactions to be sent to a script hash (address starting with 3) instead of a public key hash (addresses starting with 1). To spend bitcoins sent via P2SH, the recipient must ...


2

When transactions are published to the network, they first are mere payment promises. You have received notice of a transaction on the network to one of your addresses. However, for the money to actually become signed over to you, transactions need to be confirmed by being included in a block of the Bitcoin blockchain. Most nodes on the network track ...


2

The amount you sent (0.01047) plus transaction fee (0.00054597) totals 0.01101597. This is how much was spent from your wallet balance (0.09079308) leaving you with 0.07977711. You wallet balance consists of multiple bitcoin addresses. What you are seeing on Block Explorer is that one of the addresses in your wallet containing 0.02272056 was used, from ...


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