19

-rescan likely did nothing at all. It goes through the blockchain to find transactions that are missing from your wallet. It is only very rarely needed (like when you manually changed things in wallet.dat). -reindex throws away the block chain index and chain state (the database of all unspent transaction outputs), and rebuilds those from scratch. It is ...


16

As user Bitcoin has already pointed out, using a bootstrap.dat is no longer recommended—you can see the release notes for the new faster-synchronization feature here. As a result, the bootstrap.dat torrent links were removed from bitcoin.org after a short discussion. The bootstrap.dat file is still available here on the bitcointalk.org forum, and jgarzik ...


14

Bitcoin Core contains a tool to do this properly (filtering out any orphan blocks, putting everything in the correct order — which will work a lot better than just concatenating the block files. It's documented in its own README, here: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/tree/master/contrib/linearize In short: Launch Bitcoin with an rpcuser and rpcpassword ...


10

Okay, it appears after much trial and error, I figured out that you put the bootstrap.dat file in the AppData/Roaming/Bitcoin or ~/.bitcoin folder. You can leave everything else in that folder untouched, just add the bootstrap.dat file in the Bitcoin folder. I left bootstrap.dat in there, and finally Bitcoin-QT found it, and on the bottom it states "...


8

Let's say I found a tarball with blockchain data files which I load to my datadir and start my Bitcoin Core client, what sort of attacks am I vulnerable to? Could the files contain fake balances? It depends. If you're just importing blocks (so no chainstate/ subdirectory with UTXO set), there should not be any possible attack. The client will validate those ...


5

No, it's not possible. With the exception of Script commands, nothing in the blockchain is executed by Bitcoin Core: it's just data. Scripts are only able to do things like hashing and arithmetic, so it's hard to imagine any sort of Script-based malware. It's conceivable that malware (once delivered to your computer via other means) could use the blockchain ...


5

Since van der Woerdt's answer in first question you link to indicates you can simply concatenate the blk files, you can open a DOS window (if your using windows), then type CD C:\Users\<my_user>\AppData\Roaming\DogeCoin (if you're on Win7+) And then COPY /b blk0001.dat+blk0002.dat bootstrap.dat And that would be it!


4

 From Mac Open terminal Go to the folder where the blocks are. In this case Bitcoin's folder (it's the same for other bitcoin forks) cd "Library/Application Support/Bitcoin/blocks/" Run this code that will concatenate all the blk files. Make sure to include all the numbered blocks you find on your Bitcoin's folder. In this case there are 4 cat blk000*....


4

The bootstrap.dat file contains a serialized copy of the blockchain, usually up to the latest checkpoint released for the official client. The official bitcoin client will read this file when starting to create the blockchain without downloading it from the peer nodes. The file will then be renamed to bootstrap.dat.old so it won't be reprocessed when the ...


4

Yes, it is marked .old to indicate it is safe to delete. The blocks have been copied and imported into the main blockchain that you store. The process took time because the client was verifying the blocks.


3

 From Mac Open terminal Go to the folder where the blocks are. In this case Bitcoin's folder (it's the same for other bitcoin forks) cd "/Library/Application Support/Bitcoin/blocks/" Run this code that will concatenate all the blk files. In this case there are 4 so you would do: cat blk00000.dat blk00001.dat blk00002.dat blk00003.dat blk00004....


3

Bitcoin-qt verifies the entire blockchain the first time it starts, to be sure that all the transactions are properly signed, and all the blocks certify an appropriate amount of computation (proof-of-work). This ensures, for instance, that nobody is feeding you a fraudulent bootstrap.dat. Depending on the speed of your computer and network, this ...


3

When you run bitcoin-qt or bitcoind in command line, pass that argument. This way, the client indexes transactions from a file, not from the internet. bitcoin-qt -loadblock=/path/to/bootstrap.dat Source: http://eu2.bitcoincharts.com/blockchain/ Version 0.7 or later will also import this file by passing the command line argument "-loadblock=/path/to/...


3

Bootstrapping will be deprecated as of the 0.10 release in a few weeks. The torrent file mentioned in other answers will never be updated again because it is faster to have Bitcoin Core sync over the network. So no need to download the Blockchain seperately anymore! You can find the release notes here https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/0.10/doc/...


3

I see two broad solutions: Use an API that allows you to get blocks by block height BlockChain.info allows you to query for blocks at a certain height. Example: https://blockchain.info/block-height/100?format=json returns { "blocks" : [ { "hash":"000000007bc154e0fa7ea32218a72fe2c1bb9f86cf8c9ebf9a715ed27fdb229a", "...


2

Making your own bootstrap.dat is fairly simple. In windows, drop to your command prompt and use the following command. Copy /b blk00000.dat+blk00001.dat+blk00002.dat bootstrap.dat You'll want to keep going with the + blk*.dat files until you reach the last one. To make things easier for you, just run a batch file which can take care of adding them all ...


2

The site below has good information, including guides for different operating systems: litecoin.info/Bootstrap.dat


2

I can at least tell you what I did, on my iMac running OS X 10.9.1 (Mavericks). I ran Bitcoin-Qt, which immediately started synching. I could see by the progress bar that if it's roughly linear, it would take 8 - 10 days to complete. The nice thing about it was that I could see the directories it needed by what it created for itself in ~/Library/...


2

No. This feature does not exist (yet) in Namecoin.


2

You can also import the wallet.dat directly into Electrum. Bitcoin Core needs to download the whole chain (as you mentioned) so that'll take a while. Without the chain, your transaction are indeed illegal/conflicted. Since you have the wallet, you can just install Electrum and import it there. Electrum doesn't need to download the chain, so your balance ...


2

From what you said, I'm assuming you're using an option like this when you run Bitcoin Core (bitcoin-qt): -datadir=D:\BitCoinData (if not, you should do something like that to specify that the blockchain will be on your 1TB HDD; otherwise, it's only the small client, and not the large and oft-updated blockchain, that resides on your HDD) In this example, ...


2

Find your local blockchain: cd ~/.bitcoin/blocks Or, to bootstrap testnet, find your local testnet blockchain: cd ~/.bitcoin/testnet3/blocks Concatenate all your blkxxxxx.dat files and place the result in bootstrap.dat: cat blk* > bootstrap.dat Warning: Using tar -cf (as instructed by this answer) did not work for me. I'm importing from bitcoind ...


2

When you bootstrap the database of your Bitcoin Core, the bootstrap.dat contains all the data necessary to build the database, but your computer will still build the database from ground up, verifying each and every transaction of each block. So, compared to the regular synchronization you just save the downloading of individual blocks. Once the bootstrap....


2

It's not necessary so is not being updated anymore. Using a bootstrap torrent is slower than downloading from the network using Bitcoin Core 0.10.0 or above due to improvements in the block downloading method.


2

A 30 days old chainstate database does not make sense. Either you have the chainstate completely, and are able to do full validation, or you don't, and you can't validate at all. There is no middle ground of only validating recent transactions, as any transaction you encounter with unknown inputs could either be fraudulent or created more than 30 days ago, ...


1

With bitcoind 0.10 (current release candidate) you don't need bootstrap at all anymore as it downloads faster and more efficient than bittorrent would. Bootstrap is probably going to disappear soon. So you might not want to bother at all.


1

At this writing the bitcoin core wallet prompts you where to save the blockchain data; you can copy bootstrap.dat into that directory and it will load it from there.


1

The importing process is not instant, every block from the bootstrap.dat has to be verified first. You could be looking at this process of verification.


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