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19

The hashrate can be calculated from the expected rate of finding a block (144 a day), the actual rate of finding a block and the current difficulty. So let's calculate the average hash_rate for a single day: expected_blocks = 144 difficulty = 11187257.461361 # this is on May 22nd 2013 blocks_found = 155 # Also May 22nd 2013 hash_rate = (blocks_found/...


9

I've not touched a large part of my online wallet (two weeks), nor the paper wallets under my sink (two years), but they are by no means disappeared, idle or lost. There's really no way of telling, no matter how much thought is put into it. Some coins can be called lost, that is they don't have any associated private keys known, but there's no way of ...


9

This chart can answer that question for any period you choose: https://tradeblock.com/bitcoin/historical/1w-f-txval_per_avg-11101 Measured in BTC, the average transaction value was naturally the highest in the early days of bitcoin when its value was much less in fiat terms


8

The network hash rate can be statistically inferred from the difficulty and the rate at which blocks are found. It's just a more complex version of the fact that if you know that someone is flipping coins and heads comes up 800 times an hour, they're flipping about 1,600 coins an hour.


8

http://bitcoincharts.com/charts/mtgoxUSD has historical charts. These 3 all have 'live' charts: http://btccharts.com/ http://mtgoxlive.com/ http://bitcoin.clarkmoody.com/


7

There is LTC Charts with some long term chart data for LTC/BTC from BTC-E and Vircurex.


6

The ledger chain stores all transactions. So yes, you can rebuild the transaction history. But the validators don't need to store or serve the whole chain to operate. A new validator only needs the last closed ledger to validate new transactions. This is different from bitcoin, where nodes need the last output of the relevant public key to validate a new ...


5

Hashrate distribution An estimation of hashrate distribution amongst the largest mining pools http://blockchain.info/pools


4

It is impossible to tell lost coins from stored coins, because there is not way to tell if anyone has the private key associated with a foreign address. The only coins that can realiably be declared lost are those that have been assigned to invalid recipient addresses.


4

not sure what you mean by logarithmic graph. The time in a logarithmic scale, or the value? On both, there is a "log" button below the graph. And you can export as CSV or JSON: https://blockchain.info/de/charts/market-price?timespan=all or alternativly: https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/bitcoin/


3

What about http://bitcoinwisdom.com/? It visualizes data from 14 different exchanges.


3

The blue bars indicate the transaction volume in that period, this is how many bitcoins have been traded. Use the blue numbers at the left axis to see how many bitcoins were traded. The yellow line is the average weighted price in that period. Use the yellow numbers on the right to see what the price is. The green and red parts show the fluctuations (high &...


3

There has been a rally in price of 10% or more since May, and there is constant supply of new bitcoins entering the market, so some of the cash from the order book has since moved into bitcoins. But no doubt, a thicker order book (reflecting lots of buying interest) lessens the risk of a selloff. When Mt. Gox's BTC/USD represented 80% or more of the ...


3

at http://www.cryptocoincharts.info you see long time chart for all alternative crytpo currencies


3

As mentioned, raw transactions are incredibly easy to screw up since you must explicitly pay yourself if you want change. Here's a few scenarios besides unbalanced outputs which will produce huge transaction (Tx) fees: forgetting to pay change forgetting to convert to Satoshis in your code misplacing the decimal (perhaps due to rounding errors) swapping ...


3

red block - price was going down green block - price was going up


2

I've tried several of them, found the following to best suit my likings: http://bitcoin.clarkmoody.com/ Live streamed data Multi-Currency support Depth of market table is great


2

This should not be just a comment: http://bitcoinity.org/markets


2

As the comments mention this value is likely to change over time. Since Stephen Gornick's answer in May 2012 the highest recorded difficulty is: 3,415,121.18552938 At the time of writing (24th November 2012) this is the current difficulty and the difficulty is expected to increase again in ~257 blocks. The current difficulty can be checked at this link ...


2

at http://www.ltc-charts.com you can see long term charts for litecoin


2

In my opinion, you should not use Mt. Gox as an indication of the price of Bitcoin. The price on Mt. Gox is significantly higher than the other exchanges, because sellers must be compensated for the difficulty of getting their money off the site. Instead, you might use BTC-e for pricing info. Here is the chart you ask for: http://bitcoincharts.com/charts/...


2

There's a start and an end that can be quoted, and only one is required although both can be used. If you want US$ per BTC data from a 24th April until now until now, use: http://bitcoincharts.com/t/trades.csv?symbol=mtgoxUSD&start=1366784293 If you want all US$ per BTC data until now, use: http://bitcoincharts.com/t/trades.csv?symbol=mtgoxUSD&...


2

I wrote a bitcoin price theory is about a correlation of number of bitcoin addresses (from blockchain) and the bitcoin price, with a law of networking use like the metcalfe law. here I posted my study about your question https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=441336.0


2

Green means the price increased during the relevant period, so the lower value is the opening price and the higher value is the closing price. Red is the other way around. I think the 0% you see is a visual glitch. If you close the charts you'll see that right behind where you see this is the "Volume Discount Display" meter, which shows you how far along ...


2

Just click on the "WTF?" link in the top-right corner, and it's all explained on the very page you're looking at.


2

My favorite: https://bitcoinity.org/markets/mtgox/USD 16 exchanges huobi btce bitstamp btcchina mtgox bitfinex kraken bitcurex cavirtex localbitcoins campbx justcoin bit2c bitquick rmbtb icbit 20 currencies AUD CAD CHF CNY DKK EUR GBP HKD ILS JPY KRW NOK NZD PLN RUB RUR SEK SGD THB USD 10 time spans 10 minutes 1 hour 3 hours 12 ...


2

List of all sites I know of http://bitcointicker.co/ http://bitcoinwisdom.com/ http://bitcoin.clarkmoody.com/ http://www.coinorama.net/ (only graphical order book) http://bitjoy.org/~ (order book in "to do" list)


2

At the end of the Day this is a very trader specific questions. Trading with a moving average system is dependent on the traders preference. If you do not understand the best way you personally should be trading, you are likely setting yourself up for failure from the beginning. I recommend you read "Trading for a Living" Dr. Van K Tharpe There are hundreds ...


2

It simply is someone with a lot of coins, who sold on the open market and depressed the price (temporarily). It was an economically unwise decision, since they missed out on the fair market value as you saw. This is one example of how the Powerful Elite can Thwart Cryptocurrencies.


2

Speaking as a programmer, it's VERY easy to screw up the transaction fee. If you're not using a known bitcoin client and are making your own, it's quite easy to accidentally leave out an output or calculate things wrong. The blockchain won't accept your transaction if you're spending more than the inputs, but will happily accept transactions if you're ...


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