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1

If you purchased Bitcoin a long time ago, and it's on an exchange, and that exchange still exists, and you can recover your username and password to that exchange, then you should be able to transfer your money off of there. If you used your own Bitcoin wallet software such as Bitcoin Core, then you will need to have your wallet.dat or other wallet file to ...


3

Full nodes don't even need to store the entire blockchain (bitcoin core has a pruning mode). They must process each block at least once to ensure they have the correct UTXO set, then the raw block data can be discarded.


0

You can use pywallet to import the wallet.dat and export the private keys. Then you can just sweep them into electrum or any other wallet supporting WIF. Pywallet can be downloaded here: https://github.com/jackjack-jj/pywallet


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Save your private keys, engrave them in metal yourself, and keep them safe. That way you can always access the funds.


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Is there a practical way of quantifying the cost associated with self hosting the Bitcoin node? This includes the cost of hosting, scaling and hiring a competent developer to setup and debug the node. Depends on the business. If it's a startup you can always hire a developer for initial setup. If you experience any issues in future, pay another developer ...


1

I think I found a bitcoin private key So far as I know, a private key is 64 characters long in Hexadecimal (a mix of digits 0-9 and letters A-F only) or 51 characters long in WIF/Base58 (which includes a mix of any uppercase and lowercase letters as well as digits). There's also a mini format that is 22 characters long. It's 33 letters long That's likely ...


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Are the concerns of my colleague valid or unfounded? Are there valid reasons to believe we will regret self hosting in the long term due to ongoing maintenance costs? If so, what are some issues that we are overlooking with self hosting? I don't think maintenance of a bitcoin core full node will be a difficult task if the developer is experienced enough and ...


2

The truth is somewhere in the middle. Your colleague is correct to point out that there is an ongoing cost for maintaining your own full nodes. Beside the employee cost, there is also the cost for the actual server infrastructure, which may be higher than you think if you consider that you will need to maintain high availability, redundancy, testing ...


1

I then went on the blockchain explorer to view the transaction and I am seeing an input that is not my address I am not familiar with this particular site, but this is not unexpected. When custodial services hold user funds, they don't necessarily keep the funds in a separate wallet per user. Instead, they have one giant wallet with all the user's funds, ...


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In an effort to save on transaction size (and thus transaction fees), Bitcoin exchanges will "batch" multiple withdrawals into a single transaction. If you see a lot of other outputs on your withdrawal from an exchange, it is likely that most of these are the withdrawals of other users that have been batched together with your withdrawal, as well ...


7

Of course. Bitcoin nodes are just software that implements the Bitcoin P2P protocol. There are many software packages out there that do so (including full nodes, standalone wallets, indexing software, ...). There is no magic sauce that somehow blesses a particular piece of software into the realm of nodes - anything that speaks the protocol will do. ...


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