15

I found the easiest way to do this (version 0.12) is to issue the command (not case sensitive): bitcoin-cli getblockchaininfo Then, compare the blocks received field, to the headers field. The blocks received should increase steadily until it matches the headers field, at which point the client is synced. Once the client is synced you can check if the ...


10

You can also just tail the debug.log file in a new terminal window while bitcoind is running. It shows current block height i.e. height=181888 and percentage of download complete i.e. progress=68.189662 and keeps running in the window, so you see the progress. On Linux: tail -f ~/.bitcoin/debug.log On Mac: tail -f $HOME/Library/Application\ Support/Bitcoin/...


7

For the upcoming Bitcoin Core 0.18 release, the generate command has been deprecated and its functionality disabled. For the following major release, 0.19.0, the generate command has been removed entirely. This removal is already in the master branch of Bitcoin Core's source code. If you have built that branch from source, then the generate command does not ...


6

You can import an old uncompressed key. It'll work fine. Getnewaddress always uses scripts with 'compressed' keys now. BIP-143 (segwit) style inputs also require compression. The smaller key format results in smaller transactions, and where it's required and not just optional also simpler code.


6

run bitcoind getinfo, compare the block count to the current block height of several major block explorers such as: https://blockchain.info/ https://www.blocktrail.com/BTC https://blockexplorer.com/ http://blockr.io/ If your block count matches the block height from those sites, your block chain is in sync. If it does not match the difference in block ...


4

According to bitcoin core version 0.12.0 release notes: It is now possible to replace transactions in the transaction memory pool of Bitcoin Core 0.12 nodes. Transaction replacement can be disabled with a new command line option, -mempoolreplacement=0. Note that the wallet in Bitcoin Core 0.12 does not yet have support for creating transactions that would ...


4

If your passphrase contains spaces or special characters, you will need to wrap it with single quotes (') so that the debug console can properly parse your passphrase. For example, if your passphrase were This is my passphrase, then your command should be walletpassphrase 'This is my passphrase'


3

A bitcoin transaction is composed of inputs (coins) and output (coins). As example, if a transaction has 10 inputs worth 1 BTC each, and 10 outputs worth 1 BTC each, there is no meaningful way to discern "which input become which output?", it is a nonsensical question at a technical level. Think of it as if all of the inputs are melded together, ...


3

-salvagewallet is not a command that is run from the debug console. It is not one of Bitcoin Core's RPC calls. Rather -salvagewallet is a command line option. You set it in the command that is used to run Bitcoin Core or you set it in the bitcoin.conf file by adding salvagewallet=1 to the bitcoin.conf file and then starting Bitcoin Core. Note that -...


3

There is not quite the method you are looking for, but you can use the getblock call which takes the block hash (not height, you can get the hash of a specific height using getblockhash method). That will give you the block, and you would then need to write a script to iterate through the transactions in the block and find ones which have an OP_RETURN output....


3

There are 4 options (either command line or in the bitcoind.conf file) that have to do with whitelisting. I myself have only used whitelist where you simply specify the IP address (IPv4), without port number. -whitelist=192.168.10.20 According to the documentation you can also specify a netmask, which I haven't used yet, but should be in this format if I'm ...


3

bitcoin-cli getinfo will display the information you're looking for, OR simply bitcoin-cli getblockcount and compare the blockcount in your machine with the one in a block-explorer online


2

While you have bitcoind or bitcoin-qt running with the -server option, you can then use bitcoin-cli to run commands. It's part of the bitcoind package. If you have your conf file in a custom directory you'll have to specify that to bitcoin-cli as well, otherwise it should just work.


2

You can use any script which invokes the startBundler API but note that you will need to submit the passphrase to the node in order to start a bundler so you need to somehow protect the data in this script.


2

You can find a list of the assigned (through the BIP process) service flags in the wiki protocol documentation. The service flags supported by the reference client are defined in src/protocol.h .


1

Essentially all the parameters are documented in bitcoind -help.


1

I want to generate at least 100 address for each address type You can use for loop to create 100 bech32 addresses in default wallet('bech32' can be replaced with 'legacy or 'p2sh-segwit': Linux: for i in {1..100}; do bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet="" getnewaddress " " "bech32"; done Windows (PowerShell): for ($i=1; $i -le 100; $i++) {...


1

For set up the dns seed node, the parameter can be directly specified in chainparam.cpp if you are using bitcoin source in line that reads as " vSeeds.push_back(CDNSSeedData("someaddress.com or IP addy", "someaddress.com")); And you need to add all the seed node IP address to the A records where you have your domain name from. You might need to do it on ...


1

You can use bitcoind and bitcoin-cli in windows too. See this post for more information.


1

I figured it out, just need a comma after the descriptor param. let descriptor = "\"wpkh(xpub6Dy2ikUu5mXbDdhw2vAP1C4eiQM8rTz1NiWQt2BzGi83iHC2gEgTSD54JveyuHF9VLAqNkCGnee1jdBL7nA3JNorbqjSSS8DEV6Hn3PuNBt/*)#mn5jvyc3\"" let command = "curl --data-binary '{\"jsonrpc\": \"1.0\", \"id\":\"curltest\", \"method\": \"deriveaddresses\", \"params\":[\(descriptor), ...


1

There is no cli command that can do this. You can do it via 3 methods: In the Electrum GUI go to the view menu > show console and switch to the console tab. On the console tab type this: bitcoin.address_from_private_key("<privkeyhere>") Then once you have the address clear the console history or your private key will be saved to disk: window....


1

No. Lightweight wallets are designed specifically only for the wallet user. It only stores transactions and UTXOs relevant to the wallet. It will not store any historical data or data that does not pertain to the wallet, so it is useless for trying to retrieve any arbitrary transaction.


1

The hashed refer to the previous tx the input is consuming, and its vout position in that tx. You will need to use the electrum API to fetch that transaction's details, and look at the outputs[vin] value for the locking script, and then convert that to an address by encoding it for base58check/bech32.


1

kill <PID> should just work fine.


1

-salvagewallet will extract only the private keys from your wallet. When it does that, it may also end up corrupting your wallet if it was not already corrupted. -salvagewallet should only be used as a last resort. Because only the private keys are pulled out, all transaction and comment information is lost. That means that you will lose all of your labels ...


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