7

Paymium, operates Bitcoin-Central.net market exchange. That exchange has partnered with a financial organization such that your EUR balance held at the exchange will be (once they go live with that) guaranteed by the government. They will only be doing BTC/EUR when this goes live. Currently they offer BTC/USD, BTC/GBP and BTC/EUR markets but no fiat ...


6

If you have a secure channel to the recipient or some way to identify communications as coming from the recipient, just have them send their Bitcoin address. If you have no such channel or method, it's obviously impossible. What can you do to prove your address is yours that I can't do to prove my address is yours?


5

In practice your invoice fee should be cited in the most stable and liquid of the currencies you support. Typically your national currency since you live with it anyway. The contract would then stipulate that if the client pays in another currency that the amount that the client must pay is the going rate to sell that currency back into the primary ...


5

Repeated transactions using Bitcoins is impossible, unless you have access to the private key. This requires a specific client. Such functionality is not yet available, as most people encrypt their wallets (the client can't decode it without the user. The second approach would be preferable.


5

There are some existing sources of information for merchants wishing to use Ripple: Brief introduction and overview of Ripple for merchants Merchant's section/pages on the Ripple wiki If you are looking for something pre-implemented and easy to add to an existing automated web commerce check-out page, there isn't much available along those lines at the ...


4

As well as the https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade page you could look at: http://www.thebitcoinreview.com/ and http://www.thebitcointrader.com/p/bitcoin-better-business-bureau.html Both of these sites try to give some kind of rating or review but the data is limited at the moment.


3

I host two bitcoind RPMs (i686, x86_64) on my website which will most likely work fine for you, as they're built for CentOS 6.4. Run this command to install bitcoind : rpm -ivh http://tvdw.eu/bitcoin-0.8.1-1.el6.`uname -m`.rpm If you want to download them manually, the files are: i686: http://tvdw.eu/bitcoin-0.8.1-1.el6.i686.rpm MD5: ...


3

Vanity address' purpose is generally in its name - vanity. You mainly use it to show off, like say in forum's signatures or general donation address, not for business in most cases. Usually you won't want to use a vanity address when you want to remain anonymous, which is what you try to accomplish by using a new address for each transaction. You can use the ...


3

Identity verification on the internet is a difficult problem. One of the relatively common techniques in use is the use of the PGP web of trust. You create a unique PGP key and have other people sign it, indicating that they have checked your identity. Once you are connected to enough people, it is possible to verify with some degree of certainty that your ...


3

The Bitcoin wiki contains a rather large list of companies that accept Bitcons. You can also add yourself to it once you started accepting Bitcoins. The truth is Bitcoin is still in it's early days; soon it will be much easier to accept them.


3

I created an osCommerce module that can enable you to setup a full webstore that accepts Bitcoin. It enables osCommerce to talk to your own Bitcoin daemon with orders being updated once payment is received. Then the funds can be sent on to an address off your webserver to reduce risk of storing too many bitcoins on the server. Also keeps your BTC prices ...


2

Yes, the most comprehensive and well-known such list is at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Trade.


2

To start with, you could try using a vanity generator and getting a custom address that would be harder to forge (the longer the non-random string the better). You can also try memorizing last character of two of your address, just as a safety check. You could also use a custom-made QR code with for example a photo you never folly posted on the Internet. If ...


2

One service provider that accepts bitcoins is NoTex.ch @ https://notex.ch: It's a browser based editor, that accepts donations - the donate button has been created using BitPay - or you can buy the full fledged offline version using a customized and very simple to use checkout process, which has been implemented using Blockchain.info's developer API: Step 1)...


2

There are so many places A quick google search will yield many results But other than the main list on the wiki i think the following directories seemed pretty populated. 'Official Lists' Exchanges Local Directories Marketing Online & Real Business Games & Gambling Real World Shops map overlay Donation Accepting Sites Articles 75 Places to Spend ...


2

An alternative is that the person will create a new address only for the donation amount, transfer the amount to it and then send the new address to you. Then is up to you to merge than amount into your real, undisclosed address. In this way you avoid giving people and address that might be tampered with. Assuming of course that your email is harder to ...


2

I think it would be fantastic if my tax jurisdiction were to accept payment in bitcoins. Every additional way bitcoins can be used adds to bitcoin's value -- it accelerates the network effect. When they do begin accepting bitcoins, each jurisdiction could be asked to supply the totals (via FOIA request, at a minimum). Some organization or individual could ...


2

Very little commerce can occur using a static address. A similar problem is faced where bitcoin exchanges accept cash deposit at a bank. All the customers will deposit to the same bank account, so the solution was to request a unique amount for each customer. That amount is what marks the transaction and provides the ability for the exchange to know which ...


2

But what is an online store, that quotes goods both in Bitcoin and, say Ripple (but insert any alternative crypto currency here), to do in this situation? It has to have a fast and reliable access to some exchange current bid and ask and constantly update the prices of goods. Since you mentioned Ripple I'll give you a Ripple answer. If a merchant was using ...


2

But what is an online store, that quotes goods both in Bitcoin and, say Ripple (but insert any alternative crypto currency here), to do in this situation? It has to have a fast and reliable access to some exchange current bid and ask and constantly update the prices of goods. First off, would that really be so bad? I could write a program that polled ...


2

That's the thing about a pseudonymous digital currency -- there's little information that can be gleamed from the blockchain data. There are some metrics reported in aggregate by the payment processors and others. For instance, last month BitPay shared during a discussion that they had surpassed 10,000 transactions since their launch over a year earlier. ...


2

Currently still, most companies want to receive in fiat currency. Most of these merchant payment companies function as a man-in-the-middle, so that you don't have to be concerned about anything Bitcoin-related. They provide functionality with which your customers can purchase goods using Bitcoin and you will receive all payments in your fiat currency of ...


2

Further to @StevenRoose's answer, if you price your goods or services in a non-Bitcoin currency (eg USD), then it's not necessarily a simple matter of looking at a single exchange's best Buy offer to obtain the exchange rate for a transaction. For example, let's say the customer wants to purchase a US$1000 item, and the best Buy offer on the MtGox exchange ...


2

Bitcoin is generally accepted in France however the government seems to be very willing to prosecute anybody who is in breach of reporting or other laws. Somewhat recent proof: http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/07/07/us-france-bitcoin-idUSKBN0FC19220140707 There is not much legislation on Bitcoin, however it is clear that you can not use new technology to ...


2

You can try CoinMap. It's the largest database of physical locations that accept Bitcoin.


1

Blockonomics recently introduced peer to peer invoices which are perfect for freelancers/contractors to maintain security/privacy. You can invoice in any currency and it would show BTC converted according to rate at the time the payer opens the invoice.


1

The contract language to use is along the lines of: $N converted to bitcoins using the prevailing exchange rate [obtained from source, such as 24 hour weighted average] on the date that payment is made.


1

You can also try this setup, by another fellow StackExchange member. Or you might want to take the easier route and use a Bitcoin Payment Gateway.


1

One answer is that it makes many things that are hard to do with fiat money trivial. Including: Send money electronically from one entity to another without the need for an intermediary. (Beneficial because those intermediaries often charge fees as well as imposing their own terms and conditions). Enable more anonymity in electronic transactions. (Note that ...


1

Paper fiat currencies issued by Governments could work perfectly well, provided they used the money for the benefit of society. IE, if they had the discipline of the Bitcoin code, we wouldn't need Bitcoin, the trouble is, Govts become corrupted, they are tempted to fund projects they can't afford or otherwise should not get involved in (wars) by printing ...


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