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20

The given answers don't answer the question. Even though it might not makes sense to achieve a thousand connections, here's how to do that on Debian. You want to make some slightly changes in the code and recompile bitcoind: Get required packages for compiling: $ aptitude install git make build-essential libssl-dev libboost-all-dev libdb-dev libdb++-dev ...


20

Bitcoin by default will not make more than 8 outgoing connections, and -maxconnections only controls how many incoming connections you allow. Feel free to set this higher, but it will take time before others connect to you in large numbers. Please don't change this, as there is no need. Connectable peers on the network are a scarce resource, and essential ...


15

I am just guessing here given the little I know about bitcoin and distributed databases. This comes down to the how CAP theorem applies to the bitcoin blockchain DB. CAP theorem states that it is impossible for a distributed computer system to simultaneously provide all three of the following guarantees: Consistency (all nodes see the same data at the ...


12

The bitcoind client has a maxconnections configuration option. The client launched With -maxconnections=N will allow up to N incoming connections to be established simultaneously. Perhaps you may need to increase the connection timeout for that many connection attempts from a single (possibly underpowered) node. Perhaps set it to like 15 seconds (15000 ms)...


12

The problem is that in GUIMiner, the URL for Slush's pool is: api2.bitcoin.cz:8332 That address has been deprecated, and it falls back to the GetWork protocol. From Slush's Pool news: 10.03.2013 Default mining URL for Stratum is stratum.bitcoin.cz:3333. If you're still using api.bitcoin.cz, please fix your URL to prevent fallback to deprecated ...


9

Although I believe Fred Tingey's answer is complete, it has the following attributes: it depends on a config file. it provides examples for bitcoin-qt on the windows platform, and the OP was asking about bitcoind on the linux platform. Thus, I wanted to share the following concise bash script which does what the OP wants. As others have partially noted the ...


9

Blockchain.info lists the first IP address it sees a new transaction from. If you aren't the one creating the transaction, and aren't accidentally the node right in between the node that does and blockchain.info, it's unlikely that you're the first to do so. Furthermore, they may not even be connected to you the whole time. To see what transactions are ...


8

You need to run more than one node on your machine (you can do that if you give each node a different -port and -rpcport). And you need to tell them how to find each other (using -connect=127.0.0.1:portnumber). There are examples written in bash and python in the Bitcoin Core source tree: https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/tree/master/test/functional


8

By default, bitcoin-core allows up to 125 connections to different peers, 8 of which are outbound. You can therefore, have at most 117 inbound connections. I think there is no need to handhold bitcoind to control the connection management. You could try to limit the maximum connections with -maxconnections=<num> to reduce the amount of internet ...


7

In order to run multiple nodes in regtest mode on a single machine you will need to sandbox each node. In this example I have three nodes, they are named Alice, Bob and Cory. Since Bitcoin is a Peer/Mesh network, my goal is to connect each nodes so that changes made to Cory are ultimately visible to Bob (without necessarily requiring a direct connection ...


5

The various approaches the core client takes are described in some detail on the Bitcoin wiki. Once you're connected to the network, your peers can tell you about more peers, so the big question is, how do you get the first peer? There are some hardcoded IP addresses and DNS names in the client that point to mostly-stable Bitcoin nodes. If all of these were ...


5

The reference here for running the bitcoin daemon does not really clarify what maxconnections mean. Furthermore, that maxconnections only controls the number of inbound connections and not outbound. Is this true? maxconnections counts both inbound and outbound connections. If you have 8 outbound connections, you can only have 117 inbound connections. ...


4

Bitcoin only connects to them specially when you don't have enough nodes, and then it will disconnect as soon as the seednodes give you a nodelist. Bitcoin might choose to connect to seednodes as regular peers as well, but they're not given any preference.


4

You can see from the Debug Window ("Peers" tab) that the Bitcoin Core client connects with multiple clients not only with different versions but different implementations. So to answer your question: No.


4

An outbound connection is functionally equivalent to an inbound connection except in the respect that you initiated it. An outbound only node provides the same resources to the network except that it doesn't provide incoming connection slots. Outbound-only nodes forward blocks and transactions just like any other node. I think it is generally misleading to ...


3

Bitcoind will never make more than 8 outgoing connections. By default, it will allow up to 128 connections (see -maxconnections), but that includes incoming ones. Available connection slots of fully synchronized nodes are a limited resource on the network, so they shouldn't be wasted. As long as you have enough connections to be sure that at least one is ...


3

Any of the "pirates" with nodes on both networks and who have unspent coins in the blockchain before the split would be able to spend those on both networks, for as long as the network is split. Upon joining again, the longest chain will always prevail. So anyone who mined any new coins after the split and those were mined on the shorter of the two chains ...


3

I had the same problem. The port was open, but the test at bitnodes.21.co would fail. However after my Bitcoin client downloaded the entire BlockChain everything worked. I used about 144 hours to download the entire chain with a 150Mbps fiber line. Before the entire chain was downloaded the test at https://bitnodes.21.co/#join-the-network would give an "...


3

When you are buying servers you can order multiple IP per one server, typically in the same /8 or /16 subnet. So 1 server can serve as 100 or even 1000 Bitcoin nodes. Ordering lots of IPs in lots of different /16 subnets is rarely possible for the same server. Hence this change makes it harder/more expensive to launch 1000's of rogue Bitcoin nodes - you ...


3

Nodes have more than 8 connection slots, by default they have 125 maximum connections. There are 8 outbound connections, but can still have incoming connections from other nodes when all 8 outbound connection slots are full. So in your example, the new node can open a connection to any of the other nodes in the network because they all have available ...


2

Maybe the client is having a hard time finding peers. If you close it and remove the addr.dat then restart, it will go through the dnsseed process again. http://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Data_directory


2

I was having this problem. I updated my client to the newest version (https://bitcoin.org/en/download) and it solved itself. I think the clients might stop communicating with other clients who don't update. Haven't read that anywhere or anything, just a guess. The problem has returned, but updating the client is still a good thing to do.


2

Issue solved. Simple firewall issue, always unblock 8333


2

By using process of elimination , I would do something like this. First, I would reinstall your Bitcoin wallet and see if it works. If it works properly, there was probably a Bitcoind configuration file that was messed around with in your original installation or you were using an outdated version. If it still doesn't work, install a Bitcoin wallet on ...


2

As nobody seems to have mentioned it I'll chip in for future reference. If your bitcoind node is behind a router/NAT then you can only connect to others, they cannot connect to you. Let's assume most people are in that situation, which makes most nodes unconnectable (directly at least). If you open up your node port on your router then every bitcoind node ...


2

What does this mean? I'm running the command on the same machine where the daemon is running, so no remote connection needed. It's not talking about the connection between your command line and the Bitcoin daemon, it's talking about the connection between your Bitcoin daemon and other Bitcoin daemons. How can this happen? Why does a stable running ...


2

I would like to make an addition to above answers. Instead of -connect=ip the correct option to use is -addnode=ip. -connect lets a node connect only to one node and whereas '-addnode' attempts at connecting to the specified list of nodes(ip) among other nodes.


2

Bitcoin Core doesn't seem to have an option to specify the source port for outgoing connections, so you probably can't assume anything about the source port. However, if possible, you could configure your router to look for outgoing connections with destination port 8333, which will probably be the port used by most peers.


2

A GPU miner does not have sufficient speed to satisfy the minimum difficulty requirements of pooled mining today (which is why it shows as offline). GPUs have been completely obsoleted since 2013, this is unlikely to change for the better, even if you find valid shares you will have spent several orders of magnitude more in power than it is worth.


2

What's the meaning of the score in getnetworkinfo? When you look up getnetworkinfo in the Bitcoin Developer Reference, it says about score: The number of incoming connections during the uptime of this node that have used this address in their version message If I understand that correctly, this means that the score is the number of times incoming ...


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