5

It's definitely a common problem found in a lot of those platforms that make it easy to create your own colored coin/token. Asking users to acquire the native token, such as Bitcoin with Counterparty and NXT with the Nxt blockchain, is usually not a good way to start off your relationship with that customer. Some people may be fine with it, but it greatly ...


3

You can use the rawblock interface in order to determine whether there was a reorg. Every time you receive a new block, you decode the block, in particular the block header. Then you store in your database each block and its previous block. When you receive a block which shares the same previous block as another block that you have already received, then ...


3

The link you provided seems dead by now but there is an online documentation available at http://counterparty.io/docs/about_counterparty/.


2

When I joined Ethereum in January 2014, one of the things that attracted me to the project was how transparently Vitalik wanted it to be run. Everyone in the team is identified publicly since day one, all the code is opensource wall to wall under MIT license, and how we intend to use the funds is completely transparent. Even our multisig account is public (...


2

Agreeing with all of the above, especially the point about seeing the native tokens in these systems as a form of fuel, rather than purely and simply a currency. Nxt has taken a couple of approaches to mitigate the issue of having to use native NXT tokens to pay tx fees (even if you're only trading/using Nxt-based Assets), and to make it as easy as possible ...


2

I noticed that even if I created an account for my customers, they have no way of sending that token back to me when they wish to redeem it as these platforms require their transaction fees be paid in their native currency. That's kind of true for Counterparty. The transaction fees are paid only in Bitcoin (which is a native currency of Counterparty), but ...


2

Yes, you can use your Bitcoin addresses to receive Counterparty tokens. Make sure you have the private keys to your addresses backed up. Counterparty is a layer built on top of the Bitcoin protocol which basically allows you to embed data into the Bitcoin blockchain. This data can be used to represent tokens which will be recognised by the counterparty ...


2

This is a tough one, and I think it's possible to find a solution to it, but it will depend on what your application is and the tradeoffs you're willing to accept. Today: Using Bitcoin, you could fund an account for your users, but it is far from ideal. I have done this before, I do not know of a service that offers it, and I don't recommend it. Pretty ...


1

These are bare multisig scripts, there is no address format for such type of output. So explorers basically came up with confusing (and constantly differents, as there is no right one) placeholders.


1

I see it as multisig script on OXT Blockchair shows it as multisig address: m-99d8dc4aa2b7f5b105fe442f651d73e6 blockstream.info shows UNKNOWN


1

It depends on where you live, where you sell and who the buyer is. If your jurisdiction regulates this stuff or your buyer is say, a US citizen, regulations may apply. You may be able to work around that by implementing certain basic rules such KYC/AML, either full blown, or basic (such as the user confirming they're not a US resident or citizen, etc.) ...


1

Yes it does, the project runs a reference node. The PoW comes from Bitcoin, but anyone can run a Counterparty node. I don't know if there's a name for it, but maybe it could be described as a community consensus approach. All Counterparty nodes can validate transactions embedded in the blockchain. The purpose of burning BTC was to make it a non-scam token. ...


1

Disclosure: I work for Coinprism. Counterparty uses the Blockchain for timestamping only. It doesn't use it as a ledger since it builds it's own "parallel" ledger. As a result most advanced functionality of the Bitcoin ledger can't work on Counterparty: nLockTime SPV Payment Channels and lightning networks (very important for scalability) Unconfirmed ...


1

1) Yes, as of now (v9.55.1) it's all at once. BUT, you can increase the issuance by issuing more later unless you "lock" the issuance. 2) So yes, there can be a custom distribution schedule. Example: start with 100, run a "stakeholder" vote via Counterparty broadcast or other method or decide by yourself as the issuer, then increase issuance to say 200. But,...


1

Unfortunately, fees are part of the protocol and cannot be avoided. However, there are some platforms that release users from this burden. For instance, as far as I know, the Colu platform (based on the Bitcoin blockchain) automatically covers all transaction fees (for free). Hope this helps


1

Wallets for the platforms you mentioned work with both the native currency (obviously) and the tokens issued by the platform. The assumption is that your customers will install a wallet on such a platform and create the accounts/addresses which they will use for their transactions. Is this a flaw in these systems or is there an alternative solution to ...


1

None of the 2.0 technologies are completely anonymous. At best, they are pseudonymous as Bitcoin. Some of them, like Ripple, have a disincentive to creating new pseudonyms all the time (having to pay fees to activate a new address and set up trust). The strong part of the 2.0 technologies is the ability to issue arbitrary currencies, which are often backed ...


1

There is a counterparty whitepaper: https://github.com/CounterpartyXCP/Counterparty


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