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13

When building the source use: ./configure --enable-cpumining && make At the end of the configure stage you will see a list of what has been enabled, like this: ------------------------------------------------------------------------ cgminer 2.9.6 ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Configuration Options ...


12

CPU mining is no longer supported. See CGMiner FAQ: Q: What happened to CPU mining? A: Being increasingly irrelevant for most users, and a maintenance issue, it is no longer under active development and will not be supported. No binary builds supporting CPU mining will be released. Virtually all remaining users of CPU mining are as back ends ...


11

Litecoin mining is currently more profitable for likely all GPUs. From the bitcoin and litecoin hardware wikis, you'd get 300-400MH/s for bitcoin mining and 340-470kH/s for litecoin mining if you set it up properly (and there is something VERY fishy about you getting 250MH/s with your CPU, I'd guess it is using your GPU though you don't know it...). For ...


7

Let's try to make a rough estimate. Intel's article Intel SHA Extensions gives some details on these instructions as well as sample code. The main feature is the sha256rnds2 instruction, which performs two rounds of SHA256, out of the 64 rounds that are needed to hash one 64-byte block. A Bitcoin header is 80 bytes long, so that's 2 blocks, and because ...


6

It will by default use all CPU cores available. However, if the database cache is too small, your node will spend its time fetching and writing database entries from/to disk, rather than verification You can set the size of the database cache using a bitcoin.conf setting dbcache=N, where N is the number of megabytes of RAM.


4

I suggest to use one of the updated cpuminer versions which support more than one algorithm. This way you are also set up to mine different coins which use other PoW functions. The most versatile one is tpruvot's fork:cpuminer-multi. For me this one worked out of the box on a recent Ubuntu 14.04 installation. The syntax is similar to all other cpuminer ...


4

Your best bet with a GPU is to mine scrypt coins. If you want the resulting payout to be in bitcoin, try using mining on a multi-pool like middlecoin.com. That pool automatically chooses the most profitable scrypt-based coin to mine and pays out daily in bitcoin. I have 4 7950s pointing at middlecoin and make between .05 to .1 bitcoin per day.


4

Currently, for a custom-built high-performance desktop, 16 GB of RAM (or even 32 GB) is typical, while one of the best GPUs, the AMD Radeon HD 7990, has 6 GB of GDDR5. Suppose the memory requirements were raised to 4 GB. That means that each thread will require 4 GB, so a CPU can mine on 4 threads at a time (16 / 4 = 4), while a GPU can only mine on 1 ...


4

Yes, it's possible to solo-mine using your PC. The odds are astronomically small, however. You can look up what hash rate your CPU will get here. The best possible CPU the Xeon Phi 5500 gets 140 MH/s. Current network hash rate is 570,000,000,000 MH/s. So every block, you have a 0.000000000245% chance of finding the block. You'll find one block every 76,000 ...


3

For Litecoin, if memory size is increased in processing the Scrypt algorithm, for example to 384 kB instead of 128 kB (...), would the typical CPU architecture (...) be likely to see a corresponding increase in performance? No, it works the opposite. If you increase memory, which is used by the scrypt to generate a single hash, the time it takes to ...


3

One instance of minerd is all you're going to need. The application also synchronizes with the pool. So opening more than 1 instance of minerd is just going to cause your network to be used twice for the same information. Also, the operating system has some overhead for running the application. Opening another instance will mean more overhead and thus less ...


3

You can run a miner on a CPU, you just won't generate any measurable revenue. But as an experiment, it's certainly possible to do. I run cgminer on a CPU as an integration test for one of my node.js modules. This is a rough outline of the steps you can go through to install an older, CPU-supported version of cgminer on your computer: https://github.com/...


3

Mining on a cpu at all is a bad idea, it can and will wear the cpu down, and is ridiculously slow compared to a gpu. Also mining with an Nvidia card isn't the smartest thing either as they are much slower than AMD cards. Regardless you will make next to no money mining with this kind of hardware given that there are thousands of people with ASIC miners that ...


2

Mining with a CPU is just not a sensible way to get bitcoins. Basically, you earn bitcoins the same way you earn any other currency. You earn dollars by finding people who have dollars and offering them products, services, or items in exchange for those dollars. It's the same thing with bitcoins. Find people who have bitcoins and offer them something in ...


2

Maybe not exactly what you are asking for but CoinLab have a mining pool that intends to use the computing power of their members for jobs other than hashing. From the Bitcoin talk forum topic: We’ve identified a number of opportunities to monetize our growing GPU cluster at a higher rate than Bitcoin mining, particularly for NVIDIA cards: Protein ...


2

The normal bitcoin client should not use more than a few percentages, if not even zero, from your CPU. What client are you running? The Bitcoin-Qt client? Did you ever enabled the "generate bitcoins" option? I'm not sure if it's in the Bitcoin-Qt client's settings, but you could've enabled it in your bitcoin.conf file. Maybe you should post your bitcoin....


2

When mining, you computer creates hashes. These hashes must satisfy a certain condition. All a miner does is trying many many times to find a valid hash for a block. For this reason, mining hardware performance is measured in GH/s, giga-hash-per-second, which are one billion hash calculations per second and it is called the hashrate. It is good to know ...


2

You can use cpuminer. Just make sure you have all the dependencies, compile, and run: minerd -o stratum+tcp://name-of-pool.com:port -O username.workername:password


2

It is still there as of version 0.8.5, but just a reference implementation. It's not optimized, doesn't support pooled mining, and is not exposed via the Qt GUI. To enable, start with the -gen option. But other than testnet (and even there...), it's utterly pointless.


2

Generally, CPU mining isn't worth the electricity consumes. However, we will assume that you've got some adequately efficient cores. If you are going to do CPU mining, you might have more luck using a scrypt based fork of bitcoin, such as tenebrix, litecoin, or fairbrix. Because the effectiveness of a setup can vary, as well as the price of various ...


2

Its mostly the heat...if it is running quite hot, which most laptops tend to do, it IS damaging the CPU. Try a good cooling mat if you really want to do it. Also, using 2 of 4 cores WILL run cooler than using all 4. But I guess I could repeat everyone else' advice: "Mining is no longer profitable on the CPU, don't do it." (Even though I do a little bit.)


2

You should sign up for a pool service and configure minerd to send shares to that service. Right now it is attempting to connect to a local instance of a scrypt coin (litecoind I would presume) on port 9332 for solo mining. If that is what you intended then verify that you have a server running and listening on that port. It is also not recommended to run ...


2

The hardware of the controller doesn't matter. You can run cgminer on a Raspberry Pi or a TP-Link router, both are terribly weak and it has absolutely no effect on the ASIC whatsoever. To this end, even KNC mining rigs use Beaglebone Black boards to control their top of the range miners. Most home miners use Raspberry Pi due to their low cost and easy to run ...


2

Nowadays, there are custom miners for Bitcoin. These use customised hardware (ASICs) and thus GPU mining is not profitable. However, this custom hardware does not exist for Litecoin and most other altcoins (based on scrypt). Thus, you might still be able to make money GPU mining Litecoin this way. Unless you have customised hardware, forget about Bitcoin ...


2

When you're synchronizing from network, you're most likely limited by the rate of fetching blocks. When you're reindexing blocks that are already present on disk, only CPU is the bottleneck. The algorithm to decide where and when to request blocks is relatively stupid, slow, and easy to confuse. This is why during synchronization from network, you rarely ...


2

Don't worry about it, just let your OS take care of the scheduling. As long as you're not trying to run more CPU-bound threads than you have cores, you'll be running as efficiently as you can. Even a single threaded program will bounce around between cores (you can see this by looking at a CPU usage graph, and your single threaded program will probably use ...


2

Setup a txt file and name it 42mine.bat in your pooler cpu directory (make sure when you save the file, click all files and then save) copy this into your bat file minerd --url=stratum+tcp://42.coinpool.de:1042 --userpass=my.Worker:Password Replacing my.Worker with your workers name and Password with your Password Then save the bat file, again make sure it ...


2

Just purchase a second computer specifically for Monero mining, and don't even run the GUI (Unity). If your mining efforts aren't profitable enough to warrant a dedicated computer, then you probably shouldn't be mining.


2

First of all, I would recommend that your users are informed that you will be doing CPU mining in the background while they browse your site, and that they agree to let you do this. Secondly, you should not be CPU mining Bitcoin or any altcoin for which GPU mining or ASIC mining exists. CPU mining is much more inefficient than GPU miners or ASIC miners so ...


2

Could a large botnet disrupt/hack the whole cryptocurrency system if the botnet currently holds more CPU power than the friendly nodes? Yes, this is known as 51% attack. The malicious attacker should control >50 percent of hashing power in the network. If yes,would it be feasible at all and or worth the work? Current network hashing power is around ...


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