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11

Litecoin mining is currently more profitable for likely all GPUs. From the bitcoin and litecoin hardware wikis, you'd get 300-400MH/s for bitcoin mining and 340-470kH/s for litecoin mining if you set it up properly (and there is something VERY fishy about you getting 250MH/s with your CPU, I'd guess it is using your GPU though you don't know it...). For ...


7

Let's try to make a rough estimate. Intel's article Intel SHA Extensions gives some details on these instructions as well as sample code. The main feature is the sha256rnds2 instruction, which performs two rounds of SHA256, out of the 64 rounds that are needed to hash one 64-byte block. A Bitcoin header is 80 bytes long, so that's 2 blocks, and because ...


7

It will by default use all CPU cores available. However, if the database cache is too small, your node will spend its time fetching and writing database entries from/to disk, rather than verification You can set the size of the database cache using a bitcoin.conf setting dbcache=N, where N is the number of megabytes of RAM.


4

I suggest to use one of the updated cpuminer versions which support more than one algorithm. This way you are also set up to mine different coins which use other PoW functions. The most versatile one is tpruvot's fork:cpuminer-multi. For me this one worked out of the box on a recent Ubuntu 14.04 installation. The syntax is similar to all other cpuminer ...


4

Your best bet with a GPU is to mine scrypt coins. If you want the resulting payout to be in bitcoin, try using mining on a multi-pool like middlecoin.com. That pool automatically chooses the most profitable scrypt-based coin to mine and pays out daily in bitcoin. I have 4 7950s pointing at middlecoin and make between .05 to .1 bitcoin per day.


4

Currently, for a custom-built high-performance desktop, 16 GB of RAM (or even 32 GB) is typical, while one of the best GPUs, the AMD Radeon HD 7990, has 6 GB of GDDR5. Suppose the memory requirements were raised to 4 GB. That means that each thread will require 4 GB, so a CPU can mine on 4 threads at a time (16 / 4 = 4), while a GPU can only mine on 1 ...


4

Yes, it's possible to solo-mine using your PC. The odds are astronomically small, however. You can look up what hash rate your CPU will get here. The best possible CPU the Xeon Phi 5500 gets 140 MH/s. Current network hash rate is 570,000,000,000 MH/s. So every block, you have a 0.000000000245% chance of finding the block. You'll find one block every 76,000 ...


3

Mining on a cpu at all is a bad idea, it can and will wear the cpu down, and is ridiculously slow compared to a gpu. Also mining with an Nvidia card isn't the smartest thing either as they are much slower than AMD cards. Regardless you will make next to no money mining with this kind of hardware given that there are thousands of people with ASIC miners that ...


3

You can run a miner on a CPU, you just won't generate any measurable revenue. But as an experiment, it's certainly possible to do. I run cgminer on a CPU as an integration test for one of my node.js modules. This is a rough outline of the steps you can go through to install an older, CPU-supported version of cgminer on your computer: https://github.com/...


3

For Litecoin, if memory size is increased in processing the Scrypt algorithm, for example to 384 kB instead of 128 kB (...), would the typical CPU architecture (...) be likely to see a corresponding increase in performance? No, it works the opposite. If you increase memory, which is used by the scrypt to generate a single hash, the time it takes to ...


3

One instance of minerd is all you're going to need. The application also synchronizes with the pool. So opening more than 1 instance of minerd is just going to cause your network to be used twice for the same information. Also, the operating system has some overhead for running the application. Opening another instance will mean more overhead and thus less ...


3

For development it's often helpful to start both nodes in regression test mode (regtest mode). The developer has his own private blockchain and can choose when to create a new block. You can use bitcoin-cli -regtest generate 1 to generate a new block. For more information see Developer Examples - Regtest Mode.


2

After spinning-up my Raspberry Pi and registering an account at slushpool I've had success with the following process: sudo apt-get install automake autoconf pkg-config libcurl4-openssl-dev libjansson-dev libssl-dev libgmp-dev make g++ git git clone https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi cd cpuminer-multi ./autogen.sh ./build.sh Check out the commands: ./...


2

You can use cpuminer. Just make sure you have all the dependencies, compile, and run: minerd -o stratum+tcp://name-of-pool.com:port -O username.workername:password


2

Its mostly the heat...if it is running quite hot, which most laptops tend to do, it IS damaging the CPU. Try a good cooling mat if you really want to do it. Also, using 2 of 4 cores WILL run cooler than using all 4. But I guess I could repeat everyone else' advice: "Mining is no longer profitable on the CPU, don't do it." (Even though I do a little bit.)


2

You should sign up for a pool service and configure minerd to send shares to that service. Right now it is attempting to connect to a local instance of a scrypt coin (litecoind I would presume) on port 9332 for solo mining. If that is what you intended then verify that you have a server running and listening on that port. It is also not recommended to run ...


2

The hardware of the controller doesn't matter. You can run cgminer on a Raspberry Pi or a TP-Link router, both are terribly weak and it has absolutely no effect on the ASIC whatsoever. To this end, even KNC mining rigs use Beaglebone Black boards to control their top of the range miners. Most home miners use Raspberry Pi due to their low cost and easy to run ...


2

Setup a txt file and name it 42mine.bat in your pooler cpu directory (make sure when you save the file, click all files and then save) copy this into your bat file minerd --url=stratum+tcp://42.coinpool.de:1042 --userpass=my.Worker:Password Replacing my.Worker with your workers name and Password with your Password Then save the bat file, again make sure it ...


2

When you're synchronizing from network, you're most likely limited by the rate of fetching blocks. When you're reindexing blocks that are already present on disk, only CPU is the bottleneck. The algorithm to decide where and when to request blocks is relatively stupid, slow, and easy to confuse. This is why during synchronization from network, you rarely ...


2

Don't worry about it, just let your OS take care of the scheduling. As long as you're not trying to run more CPU-bound threads than you have cores, you'll be running as efficiently as you can. Even a single threaded program will bounce around between cores (you can see this by looking at a CPU usage graph, and your single threaded program will probably use ...


2

Nowadays, there are custom miners for Bitcoin. These use customised hardware (ASICs) and thus GPU mining is not profitable. However, this custom hardware does not exist for Litecoin and most other altcoins (based on scrypt). Thus, you might still be able to make money GPU mining Litecoin this way. Unless you have customised hardware, forget about Bitcoin ...


2

Just purchase a second computer specifically for Monero mining, and don't even run the GUI (Unity). If your mining efforts aren't profitable enough to warrant a dedicated computer, then you probably shouldn't be mining.


2

First of all, I would recommend that your users are informed that you will be doing CPU mining in the background while they browse your site, and that they agree to let you do this. Secondly, you should not be CPU mining Bitcoin or any altcoin for which GPU mining or ASIC mining exists. CPU mining is much more inefficient than GPU miners or ASIC miners so ...


2

Could a large botnet disrupt/hack the whole cryptocurrency system if the botnet currently holds more CPU power than the friendly nodes? Yes, this is known as 51% attack. The malicious attacker should control >50 percent of hashing power in the network. If yes,would it be feasible at all and or worth the work? Current network hashing power is around ...


1

None exist. CPU mining had been impossible for years now. You better stop wasting energy and the life time of your computer.


1

You're not going to be able to mine Bitcoin with a CPU. This has been covered before. You'll need to buy an ASIC.


1

Check your internet connection, make sure your mining device connected right, restart your devices.


1

Most likely it isn't worth the effort, even if you're not paying for electricity. But if you want to do it, CPU coins are the way to go. I'm not sure why you consider it "more trouble than it's worth." Check out the profitability calculators for Memorycoin and Primecoin to see if they're worth your time. If you don't want to hold those coins, you can sell ...


1

It depends by the machine, of course, but keep in mind that difficulty changes as time goes on. You should look at that specific index in order to aknowledge it correctly. By now, it takes about 1 year to get 1 BTC with your hardware, supposing no difficulty increases. I do advise you to mine other currencies (BTB or others) and then convert them into BTC... ...


1

Using a CPU is a bad idea; a GPU is better. Good AMD... The best AMDs are hard to find or impossible to find, but the AMD R9 280x and 290x you can find (second-hand on eBay if you don't see them on Newegg, etc..) Sort the chart by GPU, or in your case CPU, search for your CPU... I tried to play with mining with an i7-3770, and it wouldn't. I don't have ...


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