2

You're putting the locktime in the wrong place. You have "[{\"txid\":\"myid\",\"vout\":0}]" "{\"address\":0.01, \"address\":0.01} 20" but it should really be "[{\"txid\":\"myid\",\"vout\":0}]" "{\"address\":0.01, \"address\":0.01}" 20 The locktime is a separate parameter, not part of the quoted parameter that has the transaction outputs. It goes outside ...


2

The Bitcoin Wiki entry for OP_CHECKSIG answers your question. OP_CHECKMULTISIG works the same way, just applied to each signature in the sequence. First of all, it depends on the SIGHASH type you, as the signer, choose. Most likely you will use the default SIGHASH_ALL for each of the required signatures, but you could actually use different SIGHASH methods ...


2

Generally, you don't have to. The normal workflow is: Use listunspent to identify the outputs you want to use (if any). Use createrawtransaction to construct a raw transaction with the outputs you want to create (excluding change) and inputs you want to use (if any). Use fundrawtransaction to let bitcoind add a change output back to itself (and additional ...


1

createTX() doesn't sign the transaction. That is performed by sign() in wallet.js. If your private keys are offline anyway, what kind of unexpected behavior are you getting from createTX()? It wouldn't be able to sign without the keys...? New functionality was also recently merged to return the MTX before the input scripts are templated (when the public ...


1

The original Bitcoin client did not have a debug console or many things that we see in modern Bitcoin software. Furthermore, it is a compiled software (C++ needs to be compiled) so you can't inspect the thing being run for its source code. However, Satoshi did publish the source code along with the pre-compiled binary. For transaction creation, you can find ...


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