5

As money, security is paramount. Bitcoin is still the safest and most proven crypto, despite what others claim. The network has the most miners, which makes attacking the network next to impossible. Bitcoin does have a few drawbacks, but these are being fixed 1 by 1. Solutions like SegWit and Lightning Network are major advancements. There’s nothing wrong ...


3

The host running a virtual machine has complete, unfettered access to its guest, there's no breaching or compromising necessary. It provides absolutely no additional security in your described situation. It is likely trivial to access ECDSA private key material even between two unrelated virtual machines on a single host due to sidechannel attacks.


3

Decred is limited in what you can amend with on-chain governance. With Tezos you can amend any part of the protocol, including the governance mechanism itself.


2

When dealing with a centralised exchange, there are only two points of interaction with the blockchain: Deposits and Withdrawals. In order to process deposits you will need to monitor transactions to certain addresses. A withdrawal can be processed offline with only the signed transaction being broadcast to the network. For safety reasons it is best that ...


2

Note: You cannot withdraw to a bitcoin wallet as it is an entirely different network. You would need to install a wallet that supports the so called "Vibrate" cryptocurrency, then use that to generate an address to withdraw to. I have no idea what "Vibrate" is to be honest, the closet I could find was something called "Viberate" which seems to be an ...


2

Inflation is increase in price without increase in utility. A car with similar features helps you get from point A to point B just like it did one year ago (same utility). However, the cost of the car increased by 2x one year later (higher price) indicating that the currency in which the price has been quoted has been reduced to 0.5x versus its value last ...


2

The most "profitable" way i can think of doing this is: 1) Your cousin buy BTC with AUD in Australia in some local exchange (preferrable) or at LocalBitcoins.com 2) You sell the BTC in Europe using LocalBitcoins (your cousin will give you the password for his LBC account or transfer the BTCs to your account there). They have a 1% fee for sellers, but you ...


1

Your first three questions are questions about what you want to do. We have no way to know what you want to do. Your fourth question is technical: according to What is proof-of-stake? it was said that someone possessing 1% of the total stakes "mine" 1% of the total blocks, it gets confusing here, if example 1 block contains 100 transaction, so this 1% ...


1

Value is a subjective matter and as such you can't make something be worth something else. As such, your best bet is to create a cryptocurrency and have all participants agree that it's worth the desired asset. Every other scheme with oracles and "smart contracts" and whatnots are just an iteration of the previous aforementioned social contract between ...


1

Ripple is actually a permissioned "chain", even if we stretch what the definition of a chain is. It is run by validators and as far as I know, it is not permissionless (which I equate with "trustless"). I do not see a specific need for a permissionless network to have its own coin or token. It could in theory still be driven on top of an already-existing ...


1

All online roads seem to lead to https://www.blockchaintransparency.org


1

Depending on where you live there are different options. I would suggest, if in the US, to go with one of the larger platforms like Kraken.com, or CoinBase.com. In these systems you can wire funds (Kraken) or attach to a bank account to purchase currency. In my experience, CoinBase will be your training wheels. It's hard to see what you're buying/selling ...


1

Currencies get value from demand and supply not from governments backing them. Currencies have existed long before government's started stamping them out in their own name. The demand for a currency comes from the utility that it offers as a medium of exchange. Even pre-historic humans went out of their way to create currencies because they were useful. ...


1

Free version to the previously proposed paid version: Actually, you CAN get the whole Bitcoin trades history from Bitcoincharts in CSV format here : http://api.bitcoincharts.com/v1/csv/ it is updated twice a day for active exchanges, and there is a few dead exchanges, too. EDIT: Since there are no column headers in the CSVs, here's what they are ...


1

Just put up a website cryptoarchive.com.au with the data sets I use for my own modeling. One minute OHLVC data is available for free, tick-level data - very reasonably priced. Data from Binance for now.


1

It would be correct to call StackOverflow points a "digital currency", but not a "cryptocurrency" as they don't employ cryptography, blockchain or decentralization -- which are hallmarks of cryptocurrencies. But, as you pointed out, SO points are digital and can be used to "purchase" the service of online answers. So they do meet the definition of a ...


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