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The host running a virtual machine has complete, unfettered access to its guest, there's no breaching or compromising necessary. It provides absolutely no additional security in your described situation. It is likely trivial to access ECDSA private key material even between two unrelated virtual machines on a single host due to sidechannel attacks.


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Note: You cannot withdraw to a bitcoin wallet as it is an entirely different network. You would need to install a wallet that supports the so called "Vibrate" cryptocurrency, then use that to generate an address to withdraw to. I have no idea what "Vibrate" is to be honest, the closet I could find was something called "Viberate" which seems to be an ...


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Inflation is increase in price without increase in utility. A car with similar features helps you get from point A to point B just like it did one year ago (same utility). However, the cost of the car increased by 2x one year later (higher price) indicating that the currency in which the price has been quoted has been reduced to 0.5x versus its value last ...


1

If you send BTC to a custodial wallet (ie, one which you do not control the private keys for), then you no longer have control of your bitcoin (whoever has the private keys is now in control). If you send coins to a website (to buy some tokens, or whatever), then it is the website operators who now have control of your coins. This is a well-known saying in ...


1

Why do people prefer to buy Bitcoin over other cryptocurrencies? There are many reasons: Liquidity Bitcoin is the most capitalized market amongst cryptocurrencies, and that is an important measure for any form of money. If it is difficult to trade a form of money without crashing the price of it, then it is not a very useful money in the first place! As ...


1

Value is a subjective matter and as such you can't make something be worth something else. As such, your best bet is to create a cryptocurrency and have all participants agree that it's worth the desired asset. Every other scheme with oracles and "smart contracts" and whatnots are just an iteration of the previous aforementioned social contract between ...


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It would be correct to call StackOverflow points a "digital currency", but not a "cryptocurrency" as they don't employ cryptography, blockchain or decentralization -- which are hallmarks of cryptocurrencies. But, as you pointed out, SO points are digital and can be used to "purchase" the service of online answers. So they do meet the definition of a ...


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