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16

EDIT: Caveat emptor on Ubuntu distributions from 14.10 and forward - init was chosen over upstart and is being phased in the future. I don't know when that will be done nor what impact it will have on upstart scripts. Extract from the page RentFree refers to; note that it assumes that you have created a user called bitcoinuser for the sake of security: ...


11

An explanation of the meaning of the fields given by 'getinfo' : version - The version number of this bitcoin-qt or bitcoind program itself. Both of are equivalent. -qt is simply the graphical user interface version protocolversion: The version of the bitcoin network protocol supported by this client (user agent software). walletversion: The version of ...


11

There's an upstart script for Ubuntu in the Bitcoin Core source tree. Using that is the most correct way. However, I just login as the user account I want to run Bitcoin Core daemon, start a terminal (if I'm in the GUI), and run the following command to edit my crontab: crontab -e Then I add the following line: @reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file ...


7

The -gen flag actually started a CPU miner process in older versions of the Bitcoin client, before CPU mining became obsolete. What you're probably thinking was more like bitcoind -server or `bitcoind -server -RPCALLOWIP=192.168.1.* -RPCPORT=8333 which would start a listening Bitcoin server from which a proper miner could obtain getworks. Since namecoind is ...


6

If you want to allow connections from any machine, use: rpcallowip=* If you want to allow connections from one specific IP address, put that IP address instead of *: rpcallowip=192.168.0.101 You can have as many of these lines as you like. Use one for each IP address you want to allow. And wildcards are also allowed: rpcallowip=192.168.0.* rcpallowip=...


6

Bitcoin-qt does not run bitcoind as a daemon. If you check the running processes after you launch bitcoin-qt, you will not see bitcoind being launched. They both utilize the same "Bitcoin Core" source code obviously, but bitcoind and bitcoin-qt are separate programs and one does not need the other to function. You can think of bitcoind as a GUI-less ...


5

Essentially, you want to run bitcoind while connected to the network to download all the blocks, then disconnect it from the network so it no longer downloads new data. There are several possible ways to do this, from least to most drastic: Use the -proxy option to specify a proxy that does not exist. Use a software firewall to prevent bitcoind from ...


5

I don't think Simplified Payment Verification (SPV or "light mode") is available in the reference client. There are plans to implement it in the development going on in the discussion email list though. However, you could download the source code for MultiBit and then use that as a starting point for your own daemon. Alternatively, just use the underlying ...


4

Bitcoin Core allows you to bind a separate listening socket with specific white listing properties. It has enhanced transaction relaying for use as a gateway and an immunity to banning for bad behavior. -whitebind=<addr> Bind to given address and whitelist peers connecting to it. Use [host]:port notation for IPv6 This command can be ...


4

You cannot because Bitcoin Core does not store such information. Bitcoin Core does not store all information for all addresses, it only stores information for its own addresses and the lower level information needed for verifying transactions (addresses are a higher level abstraction). There are no commands that allow you to get the balances or transactions ...


4

bitcoin-cli attempts to read the credentials from $HOME/.bitcoin. Since user2 will have a different home directory, bitcoin-cli will not able to find the credentials. You can either symlink .bitcoin from user1's home directory to user2's, or alias bitcoin-cli for user2 to use -datadir=user1home/.bitcoin. You may need to play around with the read ...


3

if anyone guesses my server and credentials, he/she is welcome to mine for my wallet. He/she can also call all other RPC commands. For example, sendtoaddress. So, if your wallet is unlocked you can loose your coins.


3

The listen option is for the P2P network connection, not the RPC service. The option you want is rpcallowip=<ip>. To allow all IP addresses to connect to your node's RPC port, you can use rpcallowip=0.0.0.0. Note that doing so is not recommended as it is insecure. Don't set rpcconnect as that will make it impossible for bitcoin-cli to interact with ...


3

The answer is to recompile the Litecoin daemon, making sure to call the configure script with the --enable-wallet option: ./configure --enable-wallet From there, make and make-install will give you a binary that has the getnewaddress RPC method available. This reason behind this is that - instead of just disabling the methods around using the daemon as a ...


2

Yes this is completely possible. There are services which run fully featured API's that provide almost everything that the client can do. http://blockchain.info/api There are other merchant processors which have similar functionality depending on exactly what you want to do also.


2

https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/49273/13941 bitcoind now supports pruning (i.e. not keeping the entire blockchain). However, this is different from SPV, since it still fully validates all transactions.


2

I've never run it before. You said that bitcoind is a daemon, so here how to configure a daemon to run at startup : Normally a daemon has its init script in /etc/init.d/ directory. sudo /etc/init.d/bitcoind start If the daemon needs to be initialized at startup, then it will be linked in /etc/rc0.d/ or /etc/rc1.d/ or ... /etc/rc6.d/ ... etc 0 -> 6 are ...


2

There are "lightweight" wallets, such as Electrum and mobile wallets, that do not require the blockchain to run. In exchange for this convenience however, their users rely on a centralized server (or servers) to host the blockchain, which is a bit of a security compromise. bitcoind is the "Satoshi client" and is not a lightweight wallet. It won't work ...


2

It's unclear which version of dogecoind you are using. However, in the current 1.5 code on Github, there is a similar message: if (mapArgs["-rpcuser"] == "" && mapArgs["-rpcpassword"] == "") throw runtime_error(strprintf( _("You must set rpcpassword=<password> in the configuration file:\n%s\n" "If the file does not exist, ...


2

I think the most easy way to do this would be through Omniwallet API. mastercoin-tools is deprecated and should not be used. If you want the better security achieved by running a local instance, use Master Core.


2

Update The Ubuntu PPA has been updated with packages for Bitcoin Core 0.9.1. Ironically, they make the upgrade warning go away, but they do not fix the problem! The Bitcoin Core packages for Ubuntu do not include a dependency on a fixed version of the OpenSSL libraries. Therefore, if you have not upgraded OpenSSL on your Ubuntu system, you will still be ...


2

In the command line on windows you must type just bitcoind -regtest whitout -daemon


2

I would like to receive the transactions of all accounts on my daemon, including the default account. $ bitcoin-cli listtransactions "*" 9999999


1

I'm running a RaspberryPi Bitcoin node. Since I discovered that the node had sometimes crashed due to overload, I put an hourly starting command into crontab: @hourly <completePath>/bitcoind -daemon -disablewallet If bitcoind is already running, it fails to start due to not getting a lock on the data directory. Otherwise, the server will be restarted ...


1

That's not an error. Continue by running make, optimally with -j set to the number of cores you have on your system.


1

On linux: ps aux | grep bitcoind Or even: watch ps aux | grep bitcoind But to answer your question slightly differently I'd suggest keeping existing bitcoind running. Then your new node add a connect statement with the local ip of the old node in the bitcoin.conf file (located usually in $HOME/.bitcoin/). Your new node will then solely connect to ...


1

All you need to do is to extract the private keys for the addresses that hold any balances into your wallet and then import these keys back to your fresh installation.


1

You're confusing Ripplecoin, which appears to be a defunct altcoin, with the Ripple network, which is another beast entirely.


1

First add this line to litecoin.conf rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 Then make sure you've added the litecoin command to your path sudo cp litecoind /usr/bin/litecoind and that your starting the litecoin daemon litecoind -daemon and test with litecoind getinfo if all that works then JSON RPC should work fine. If none of that works try setting up the client ...


1

You are running bitcoind 0.3.24. This is a very old version that won't work properly on today's Bitcoin network. The latest version is 0.8.6. It appears that the Ubuntu maintainers have not updated the version of bitcoind in the standard 12.04 repository; so you'll have to get a current version from somewhere else. The Ubuntu developers maintain a ...


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