6

No your funds would still be at risk. There are only a few popular wallets that use seed phrases. Most wallets use BIP39(https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Seed_phrase) but there are some that use different versions or no seed words at all. Electrum does not ouse BIP39, see their docs explaining why. https://electrum.readthedocs.io/en/latest/seedphrase.html It would ...


5

Start Bitcoin Core with the wallet.dat you want to export Dump your private keys via Bitcoin Core's Console using dumpwallet You'll get a list of private key to address pairs in the following format: L4ysibEFMBQc3hfr7tvUyV4nBP1YQ3AgDewszoYq5czMtXotmmro 2020-08-21T14:36:58Z change=1 #addr=bc1qpw40dkvcj23zt3efvdwqr7ddfunwktx11f3tjf Extract all private keys (...


5

They are indeed all your addresses. The addresses labeled receiving in green are meant to be given to people from whom you wish to accept a payment and the yellow change addresses are there for Electrum to use when you make a transaction with an unspent output. About receiving addresses Using a separate address for every incoming transaction is better than ...


5

Can I recover btc sent to an incorrect address? Confirmed Bitcoin transactions cannot be cancelled, reversed, undone or recovered. The only person who can give you your money back is the recipient, by creating a new transaction to send the same amount back to you. I realize now that I had a malware copy of electrum If the initial mishap was due to a ...


5

how did Electrum create a new address? Electrum, and most modern wallets are Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) Wallets. They derive a series of private-keys from the "master private-key". If you always start with the same seed phrase you get the same master private-key. Electrum uses its own unique method for seed phrases. Most wallets with seed-...


3

There's a command line electrum option convert_xkey. If you're on linux or macosx you can see the documentation for it via electrum help convert_xkey. Alternatively you can use the console tab of electrum on all operating systems to achieve the same result. For example convert_xkey(xkey="xpub...",xtype="p2wpkh") will convert from p2pkh to ...


3

Electrum doesn't connect directly to Bitcoin nodes. Instead it connects to Electrum servers using the Electrum protocol. These servers run Bitcoin nodes and additional Electrum server software in order to provide the data that Electrum actually needs to operate. So you need to be running an Electrum server software that connects to your node and then connect ...


3

Generally, yes, mnemonic phrase contains enough data for software wallets to derive the keys. With the caveat. Some software wallets imports are supporting only 12 word or 24 word combinations. Some support different BIPs and thus path derivation schemes (32/44/84) by default, and some only single one of them. Some have additional feature for a specific seed ...


3

While Murch answers the technical side of it already, what you're trying to do is simply not possible. There is no provision in Bitcoin to know the exact time a transaction was broadcast (short of running several nodes that connect to enough of the network to attempt to deduce the first broadcast time). If you're trying to protect yourself against price ...


3

Here's a descriptor for a 2-of-3 created by Electrum. Receive addresses: sh(sortedmulti(2,XPUB_1/0/*,XPUB_2/0/*,XPUB_3/0/*)) Change addresses: sh(sortedmulti(2,XPUB_1/1/*,XPUB_2/1/*,XPUB_3/1/*)) (Replace XPUB_1, XPUB_2, and XPUB_3 with your three master public keys )


3

Electrum will generate a certain number of addresses in advance. It doesn't really matter since it will always generate the same addresses in the same order thanks to using Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) wallet, but you can modify the number of addresses generated if you want, it's called the gap I think. The gap can sometimes matter though if you're using ...


3

Can you really trust a non-open-source desktop wallet? No Shouldn't everyone be using exclusively open-sourced wallets for this reason? Yes, everyone should use open source wallets. And still use small amounts in hot wallets or wallets that are relatively new and experimenting with new features. More details: What stops a wallet from stealing bitcoins?


3

Such a transaction is standard and would relay. However neither the Bitcoin Core wallet (via the bumpfee command) nor the Electrum wallet (via the GUI) would create such transaction. More information about fee bumping in the Bitcoin Core wallet can be found here.


3

Yes it is possible, as long a Binance is willing to let you withdraw your coins. Steps: Open your electrum wallet. Open the 'Receive' tab, and copy the 'receiving address' to your clipboard. Open Binance. Navigate to the page where you can initiate a withdrawal. Paste the 'receiving address' from Electrum into Binance withdrawal form. Be sure to triple ...


3

To accomplish this you will not 'transfer the bitcoin', you will just import the keys that can spend your bitcoin, into a new wallet. Not all wallet software will support importing/exporting keys in every format, so you'll need to ensure that your current wallet software is capable of exporting keys in a format the the new wallet will accept. There are ...


2

The addresses tab is hidden by default precisely because new users get confused by all these addresses. They are all a part of your wallet and it is best practice to use a different one for every transaction. The change addresses are for internal use by the software. When spending bitcoin outputs the whole output has to be spent and any remaining amount sent ...


2

Thanks for explanation. But can I transfer that change from change address back to my lets call it "primary" address that I use to keep most of my BTCs? I lack reputation to answer to your second question, so I will answer here. There is a very good reason to consolidate all your balance into one, if you are not worried about privacy: To save on fees. ...


2

In my case, the master pubkeys do match, they are just encoded differently, with one (ab)using the xpub version prefix and the other Zpub, and corresponding checksum bytes in the end. The actual curve points and all derivations from this coincide.


2

On a principle / technical level I see no reason why it should not work as you propose. However I see engineering Challenges: The workflow of funding channels and (more importantly swiping on chain data if everything is sent to multisig addresses and requires your multisig partner to sign) would require way more communication overhead and dataflow. Note ...


2

Electrum servers are simply not compatible with Bitcoin Core on a development or operational level. They require a vast amount of indexes created which the node does not have, and must be created by an external tool. With the state of the art electrs Electrum server, it needs upwards of a day of time to create these indexes, and more than 50GB of additional ...


2

Is the precise date and time of when a payment was sent attached to a transcaction and can it be retrieved? No And it is useless information anyway. The transaction fee chosen by the sender can influence whether the transaction gets included in a block in 10 minutes, 10 hours or 10 days. If all you care about is that the sender broadcast their transaction ...


2

Jameson Lopp has a tool on his github that performs this function. Paste your xpub into the text box, and select the type you want from the drop-down and click convert. Demo: https://jlopp.github.io/xpub-converter/ Source: https://github.com/jlopp/xpub-converter


2

No, you can't, apart from trying various paths and re-deriving it.


2

get_tx_status('TXID') Replace TXID with transaction id. >> get_tx_status('c12ed68e512aa68dbf88878902efba20446024b645f5254f4b9411db2c6e684c') { "confirmations": 589 } The transaction should be associated with your wallet else you will get below error: Exception: Transaction not in wallet.


2

You can use it. Electrum, nowadays, is as popular as Multibit used to be, so you can assume that you will always be able to recover your coins. To be safer, you can export the private keys from Electrum and save them in an encrypted archive such as ZIP or 7zip. (But you need to do this every time you make a transaction) What I would actually do would be to ...


2

go to Tools-> Export Private Keys After you find the .key file, open it in a text editor. The key file should start with the line: “KEEP YOUR PRIVATE KEYS SAFE !” The keys start at the last # line


2

You could theoretically export the wallet to a new type by seed (p2pkh to p2wpkh) but it would not recognize any utxo that came into it as the derivation for p2pkh and p2wpkh are different. It's not like with some altcoins who created new "address standards" that are just different way of hashing public keys, in bitcoin p2pkh and p2wpkh are ...


2

Electrum allow you to create HD wallets that use seed to generate a near infinite amount of addresses. All bitcoin addresses are public so it is better to use different addresses each time you receive coins for privacy reasons Here is the official answer to your question from electrum: https://bitcoinelectrum.com/frequently-asked-questions/#why-does-electrum-...


2

When you open a channel, the complete channel balance starts out on the side of the opening party, you. So, by opening two channels, both channels had the complete balance on your side. This leaves no balance on the side of the counterparty to assign to you. To explain graphically, think of a channel as a string of beads. I use [U] for you, and [C] for the ...


2

Enter output address, amount and click on pay: Decide the fee rate and click on finalize: You can export the transaction hex from bottom-left before or after signing the transaction: Make sure "Advanced Preview" is active in the preferences:


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