New answers tagged

0

Bitpay is easy to use but certainly has many limitations at least on the merchant side. In my country it has even suspended the bitcoin settlement service altogether. If your company is interested in investing a bit on the cryptopayment side, maybe can be a more wise approach building your own infrastructure, maintaining a BTCPay server and a Bitcoin full ...


1

Selecting final will disable RBF for the transaction and you will not be increase the fee anymore. Example: I did a transaction 7d1a7ecd1a68443c07f89f38180d3f3dc945edb2784ebfb7f7c113842d7d8509 with fee rate 1 sat/vByte, increased the fee rate to 3 sat/vBbyte and replace the transaction with d47e59db69c91f3e653da9c5ed0e0f9fc8fdc4422a4e8650d4d6b66c1db60f18 and ...


0

Coin selection algorithm in Electrum favours privacy so its using all the UTXOs associated with the address as explained by leevancleef. To reproduce this I followed the below steps in Electrum 4.0.9: Send some amount to one of the addresses from coins tab. Freeze other coins Try to create a transaction paying amount less than both coins available for ...


1

Electrum used both UTXO, even if only one was needed, to protect your privacy albeit at the expense of higher fee. This is from the Electrum source code and explain this choice: Attempts to better preserve user privacy. First, if any coin is spent from a user address, all coins are. Compared to spending from other addresses to make up an amount, this reduces ...


0

With the seed phrase exposed, your funds are likely to be stolen since majority of the wallets implement BIP-39 (which standardize seed words generation). With the exception of Electrum, it would be easy, possibly import attempts in less than five wallets, for someone to transfer the funds. To quote a section on wallets and seed words (mnemonic words) in ...


2

Nevermind. I found out that it is a 2 factor authentication fee. At first I just didn't expect it to be this much.


1

After many hours, I found it! It is exactly what Mnemonic.mnemonic_to_seed() does in mnemonic.py! (link) The most relevant part is what it returns: seed_byte = hashlib.pbkdf2_hmac('sha512', mnemonic.encode('utf-8'), b'electrum' + passphrase.encode('utf-8'), iterations = PBKDF2_ROUNDS) Where PBKDF2_ROUNDS = 2048. Then, I just did... bip32_node = Bip32....


0

Well, it's been a long time, but I've been able to find a way by myself. The python function for getting script hash is this: from pycoin.symbols.btc import network import hashlib def get_script_hash(addr): script = network.parse.address(addr).script() return hashlib.sha256(script).digest()[::-1].hex() And the full code to check the balance of a ...


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Definitely your funds would still be in danger. The word list isn't universal but the fact that even a few of the seeds were to be known cuts down drastically the amount of time it would take to crack a 12 word mnemonic seed phrase. With encryption it is more about how long it is going to take to crack something... not if. As it is now, if the wordlist is ...


5

how did Electrum create a new address? Electrum, and most modern wallets are Hierarchical Deterministic (HD) Wallets. They derive a series of private-keys from the "master private-key". If you always start with the same seed phrase you get the same master private-key. Electrum uses its own unique method for seed phrases. Most wallets with seed-...


2

if I happen to get my 12-words compromised and someone gets to know them, then I would be still safe as long as this person does not figure out which wallet app I used? Technically, no. The attacker only needs to figure out the algorithm used to convert the passphrase into the public key, which may be used by multiple apps. But that is probably not what you ...


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