11

Of course you may trade bitcoins with just anyone without having to pay fees to a centralized exchange. I think Bisq (formerly BitSquare) may be the best answer to the question; decentralized, free for some definitions of "free", and very low risk due to the escrow system - but not completely without fees, indeed as of 2017 one may end up paying quite much ...


10

When a market charges taker and maker fees, they differentiate whether you're increasing the size of the order book or decreasing the size of the order book. When you create an order that is immediately matched with already existing orders, you're a taker because you take liquidity from the market. When you add an order that doesn't match existing offers, ...


8

Some Chinese exchanges don't charge a fee. Any site that has possession of your bitcoins or dollars means there is at least some risk of getting ripped off. So unfortunately, what you ask for doesn't exist.


8

Essentially, you have to factor in 3 fees in a purchase: 1. Deposit fee (if applicable) This is usually a fee for wire transfers, and from my experience is only relevant if you deposit cash across economic zones, albeit this is slowly reducing to 'anywhere to asia', or outside of the SEPA zone. Kraken charges 5€ per wire transfer, SEPA transfers are free ...


6

There is no middle man for using Bitcoin. If all your income and expenses were in Bitcoin, the transfers would have negligible overhead. But what you are looking for is a service that will take your government currency and give you bitcoins. Of course such a service has costs involved. There are several big exchanges where you only need to trust the exchange ...


5

How are fees charged? They are charged in the currency fee set during a trade. Due to a discreet nature of trade matching process, it's rather tricky to give a definite answer on how each individual fee is applied. However, a good rule of thumb is to choose a fee currency when placing an order, as this is the one in which fee will be subtracted. Are the ...


4

Yeah it's called buttercoin here is their code.


4

Bitsquare.io is currently the state of the art and it is open source: https://github.com/bitsquare/bitsquare/


4

Peatio is an open source crypto exchange. Their README says: Peatio is a free and open-source crypto currency exchange implementation with the Rails framework and other cutting-edge technology. Mission Our mission is to build the world best open-source crypto currency exchange with a high performance trading engine and safety which can be ...


4

BTC-E does not BUY LTC. They just have Buyers and Sellers. When you buy 1 LTC you do not buy it from BTC-E but from Sellers which are on BTC-E (for example you (Bob) buy 1 LTC on BTC-E. BTC-E make you buy it from 2 sellers (Gerard and Bernard)). BTC-E takes fees for the 'link' between you (buyer) and the sellers. You see on BTC-E a list of Buy orders and ...


4

Mtgox uses a multi currency trading engine that matches trades between the different currency pairs. All trades are drawn from the one pool. Trades in one currency are matched against trades in another currency using ECB exchange rates, and tacking on a 2.5% fee. See Mtgox FAQ for further info: https://support.mtgox.com/entries/20800336-Multi-Currency-...


4

A popular opinion in the Bitcoin space is that transparency is key for Bitcoin businesses. Bitcoin and it's pseudonymous nature make it very suitable for scams and corruption. Competitive fees or additional payment options are no longer the key to the success of an exchange. There are so many exchanges that you can almost certainly find what you need ...


4

Fees are not based on the value that is being transferred but rather the size of the transaction in bytes. The fee is to pay the cost of storing the data that makes up the transaction itself, not for the amount that is being transacted. Thus giving the fee as a percentage of a value will be completely inaccurate and giving a fee estimate for the cost of ...


3

The formula for sell_order_Net_total will be: sell_order_Net_total = sell_amount * sell_price * (1- sell_ex_txn_fee) The final profit: Profit = sell_order_Net_total - buy_order_Net_total Keep in mind that there are also transaction fees between the two exchanges. If you have traded all your DOGEs for BTC on 1 exchange, and BTC for DOGEs on the other, ...


3

In my humble opinion the ideal exchange works without needing to be trusted. I mean that this exchange must find a way to work without having direct control on customer funds, this controls (private key) remain in the hands of the customers. If this is not possible for the trade to occur, limiting as much as possible the funds controlled by the exchange is ...


3

Try Exchange war: https://exchangewar.info/ which shows even the most popular pairs for each exchange.


3

bitcoincharts.com pretty much is what you look for I think. They got a huge list of exchanges and detailed informations about each site.


3

This is most likely explained by the high fees on bitcoin. These services still have to move the bitcoin from one wallet to another and you have to pay a fortune at this time, about $6- $19. You didn't do anything wrong this is something that will be fixed on the #bitcoin chain once #segwit and Lightning Network are highly adopted.


2

The best way to transfer between exchanges without fees is bitcoin. Coupons (like mtgoxusd) used to be very nice, but now it seems fees are often charged in addition to some of the coupons becoming unreliable. An arrangement in #bitcoin-otc may work well at a low fee, but -otc isn't often quick. In consideration of these two facts, I've come to the ...


2

The force keeping the exchange rates of various currencies in balance is the same force keeping the exchange rates the same across multiple exchanges: Arbitrage. When the value of Bitcoin is different enough that one could buy cheaply for one currency then sell for a profit in another, or in the same currency across multiple exchanges, people will do just ...


2

(2) is the correct answer, the exchange will match the buy order with the lowest sell orders. This is the case with mtgox. Other exchanges should do the same, however it is up to them, hard to give a general answer here, need to look at each one case by case (4) is specifically NOT true in case of mtgox because they do not act as counter party to any ...


2

btc-e.com 0.2% Trading fee 0.5 LTC for withdrawing Litecoin vircurex.com 0.5% Trading fee 0.1 LTC for withdrawing Litecoin these trading fee's are very low although i do admit the withdrawal fee's are high for any small transfers. But really these are your only options and it's very unlikely any alternatives are around or will be around soon that can beat ...


2

If you are in London, you could go to the local meetup group and sell them directly http://www.meetup.com/London-bitcoin-meetup/ and there is also https://localbitcoins.com/ Both ways people can pay you in cash, with no fees.


2

If you can buy using https://localbitcoins.com/ in both places then you can just buy some bitcoins locally before you leave and sell them locally when to get to where you are going.


2

No, the transaction fee is not increasing over time. According to the Bitcoin wiki, these are the rules under which the reference implementation decides weather or not to include transactions (and therefore how fast they are confirmed): 27.000 bytes in the block are set aside for the highest-priority transactions, regardless of transaction fee. ...


2

That depends also on your BTC balance AFTER the sale. It seems that there is indeed 1000 DOGE subtracted from your balance, so that is correct. If there has been 0.00061 added to your BTC balance, then no fees have been deducted. If 0.00061*(1-0.0018) = 0.000608902 have been added to your BTC balance, then the fees have been deducted from your received ...


2

Edit July 2018: These sites, even all this thread could be outdated. My opinion some years later has changed. Fee is the way the exchanges win money, so if you trust some exchange without fee... The exchange is no charging fees due to an temporary offer, and this thread will be outdated very soon. The exchange will win money with other services, so on long-...


2

A maker fee is when you create an order on the order book (this could be a buy or a sell) and someone else completes it, therefore you pay no fees and get the amount paid. The one that completed your order pays the fee. The other way around, if you sell into a order already posted, you pay the fee, and they do not. Maker fee refers to the fee it costs when ...


2

Bitcoin was never really meant to have no/low transactions fees. What was always intended (and still is true) was to have market driven transaction fees. In fact, as block rewards grow smaller, the plan has always been to eventually compensate miners from fees alone. Because transactions take up space in a block, and block space is limited, there is a ...


2

Coinbase holds a large amount of Bitcoins. When you buy Bitcoin on Coinbase, they do not need to actually send it to your wallet, they just need to say on their servers that you own X amount of Bitcoins. They charged you $1.49 because of the payment you used and/or to take a small profit. If you were to move your Bitcoins to a wallet you actually own at home,...


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