13

New offers and orders are matched respectively with the best order and offer available until they are fulfilled. If there is more than one entry at the same price, the oldest entry will be matched first. If a new entry cannot be matched completely, it will remain in the order book until the remainder is matched or it expires. See an example below: The ...


13

When a market charges taker and maker fees, they differentiate whether you're increasing the size of the order book or decreasing the size of the order book. When you create an order that is immediately matched with already existing orders, you're a taker because you take liquidity from the market. When you add an order that doesn't match existing offers, ...


7

In a limit order, you specify how much of the asset (in this case BTC) you want to buy or sell, and the price you want. If there are matching orders on the book (e.g. someone who wants to sell at the same price, or lower, as the price at which you want to buy), your order will be filled immediately. If not, your order will stay on the book until matching ...


5

This situation would not exist. True market orders (buy or sell) cannot just "hang" around. If they are not executed immediately against existing limit orders, then they should be cancelled. The case in which they would not be executed would be if there are no orders on the other side. In which case it depends on how the system handles the orders but it ...


4

It's because the Total column is not the cumulate sum of the column Count but of the column Amount. In your example, at the line for price 1612, Total=6.0 and indeed if you do the sum of all amount of the price above 1612 it gives you : 0.3+1.2+1.7+2.8 = 6


3

A maker fee is when you create an order on the order book (this could be a buy or a sell) and someone else completes it, therefore you pay no fees and get the amount paid. The one that completed your order pays the fee. The other way around, if you sell into a order already posted, you pay the fee, and they do not. Maker fee refers to the fee it costs when ...


3

At Cryptsy the order is First In First Out influenced by the account's trading history. If the server were to receive buy orders at the same time assuming there is enough coins at the specified price to fill the orders, the server looks at each account and the one with the most trading history gets processed first, then in order to the account with the least ...


3

You are submitting a float value. Float values are not totaly accurate: >>> 0.9 0.90000000000000002 Thats why the specification requires a Decimal datatype: >>> from decimal import Decimal >>> Decimal("0.001")


3

It depends on who posts the order first. If Alice posts first a sell at 90, then Bob posts a buy at 110, Bob will buy from Alice at 90, and any excess will be posted as a buy at 110 (if he wanted to buy more than Alice sold). If Bob posted first a buy at 110, then Alice posted a sell at 90, the opposite would happen: Alice would sell to Bob at 110, and any ...


2

I used Coinbase.com to buy BTC with USD which cleared in 4 days. Then I sent my BTC to MtGox which took about 30 min. The only downside to Coinbase is that when you buy bitcoin with USD you lock in at that BTC price and can't touch it for 4 days, i.e. no opportunity for stop loss. I was fortunate in that BTC went up in price while I was waiting. Ideally ...


2

This answer is no longer applicable, since CampBX is shutting down. CampBX offers limit orders, and allows US residents to deposit dollars by mailing postal money orders, or (after a verification process) personal checks.


2

Q1: Yes, orders will be partially filled. Some exchanges offer advanced orders that can only be completed wholly, but that's not the default. Q2: The deciding price is the one that entered the book first. So if first a $90 ask is placed and then a $100 bid is placed, the trade will be executed at $90.


2

You simply don't know via any existing APIs that I'm aware of. Potentially you could regularly update a market depth API watching for large changes at a price point which would indicate a large order. However you can't tell whether someone has broken up a large order into a number of smaller orders, and using a bot it's trivial to cancel a large number of ...


2

That depends also on your BTC balance AFTER the sale. It seems that there is indeed 1000 DOGE subtracted from your balance, so that is correct. If there has been 0.00061 added to your BTC balance, then no fees have been deducted. If 0.00061*(1-0.0018) = 0.000608902 have been added to your BTC balance, then the fees have been deducted from your received ...


2

In general, if an exchange wants to execute a buy or sell order without asking you, the relevant Bitcoins need to be held by an address that the exchange controls. When an order executes, and Bitcoins change hands, nothing changes on the blockchain. The only thing that changes is a record internal to the exchange. It's only when you withdraw the money from ...


2

I figured this out. A "Limit" order is what I wanted to do. A limit buy order will trigger if the price hits the target or lower. A caveat for anyone unfamiliar like I was: the order won't necessarily be fulfilled at the price your specify, rather it will become a market order which will execute at the next best available price.


2

If you bid a higher price than a buy order, you will purchase that buy order at the ASK price, you won't pay more than they were asking for. Your order will fulfill all sell orders up to the amount and price you set your bid. This is known as a limit order. If you requested to buy more coins than the $49 sell order, you would fulfill that order at $49 and ...


2

You can use this field from response json to know if order is filled QuantityRemaining And this filed tells if order is open or close IsOpen Its pretty self-explanatory. Comment if you wish to know more things.


2

what is the exact definition of a buy/sell indication in the trade history? A trade whether it will be marked as buy/sell will depend on how the order book is consumed. Assume the last traded price (LTP) is $100 and for simplicity sake assume the order book allows only integer increments in the bid and ask prices. So your order book will have bids starting ...


1

This is a shortcoming of the Bitfinex API. For example, say you have 0.5 BTC and you'd like to buy as much ETH as you can with it, you need to calculate how much ETH it might work out to and then pray the order book doesn't change between the time of your calculation and the time of the order. The feature to use all available funds isn't a good solution. ...


1

When a new order is added to the order book, it will first be matched against already existing bids and offers. The older orders take precedence: you match them at what you saw on the order book. If there are multiple orders at the same price, they are prioritized oldest first. In your specific example where you bid with a larger amount on an order book ...


1

First know who is maker and who is taker? If you place an order above the current ticker price for selling or below the current ticker price for buying, you add liquidity to the market and you thus act as maker. In this case you have to pay maker fee. If you want to fill your order at the current market price, you are taking liquidity from the market and ...


1

A TAKER is when you place an order at the market price that gets filled immediately, you are considered a taker and you will pay a fee for books. A MAKER is when you place an order which is not immediately matched by an existing order, that order is placed on the order book. If another customer places an order that matches yours, your fee will be 0% and you ...


1

Count: This is the total number of orders at that level. A count of 1 means that 1 order is at that price point. A count of 6 would mean that there are 6 orders at that price point. From https://support.bitfinex.com/hc/en-us/articles/115003284889-Order-Book-Terms


1

The Cryptsy driver does not support this, or any kind of argument, actually. https://github.com/timmolter/XChange/blob/df9eb4e4d95c5bb3954b1527f585d9238514fa94/xchange-cryptsy/src/main/java/com/xeiam/xchange/cryptsy/service/polling/CryptsyPublicMarketDataService.java#L39 Neither does BTCE. https://github.com/timmolter/XChange/blob/...


1

There is nothing wrong with it. Just put the order up you want, and wait for it to execute. There are far worse things to do on the internet these days then filling the orderbook. Nobody will care, because most of the time it is outside the visible range (the orderbook pages from Kraken for example).


1

Trading with oneself is commonly known as wash trading and is most commonly used to manipulate markets. I want to know is it a default protection practice, used all over the exchanges or only a GDAX innovation? Other exchanges implement this feature. To discourage wash trading, some exchanges will cancel orders that wash, yet still charge commissions for ...


1

On "real" exchanges Trading Against Yourself or Wash Trades are usually forbidden. Either by a real time check when you enter the second order or after the fact with fines by the oversight agency. As Bitcoin Exchanges are not regulated, it's their choice to either block you from doing it or not (earning fees for the exchange). The spread is pretty wide, so ...


1

Its exactly as you state in the third paragraph. If you (limit) sell 1 BTC for $1000, you would expect to get $1000. But if someone just placed an order to buy 0.5 BTC for $1050, you will sell to that guy first (so only half of your order) and will receive $525 for that. The other 0.5 BTC you want to sell, sells for $500 (so $1000 / BTC) if someone has that ...


1

According to this answer it allocates according to rule #1 - First Some First Serve.


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