3

For small amounts it's fine to accept unconfirmed transactions. You must really understand how the protocol works to be able to double-spend an unconfirmed transaction. I'm sure in the future hackers will build tools to allow for these sort of scenarios to benefit them, but also bitcoin clients will grow more secure and be able to diminish the propagation of ...


3

I would envision that when the waiter brings the bill, there would also be a QR code printed on it. This would be a one-time address owned by the restaurant, and given only to this customer for their particular bill. If payment is made to this address, then the restaurant knows that the customer paid (or at least someone did). An amount would probably not ...


2

Bitcoin is the incumbent in the space with a strong lead. It is not feasible to create faster blocks than about 60 seconds (as short block intervals create a host of other problems). 60 seconds however, is still way too long to wait at a cash register for a payment to confirm, and would be incompatible with current checkout processes. This means: ...


2

I agree that better client software will inevitably emerge with broader adoption. Concerning the amount of time it takes for a transaction to confirm, I think that you have to distinguish different scenarios in which Bitcoin is taking the place of the previous solution: Payment in a store: 0-confirmation is acceptable for tiny payments like getting a ...


2

The effort to successfully pull off a double-spend is disproportionate to the cost of paying for a couple cups of coffee. Not only is the window smaller than 10 minutes, but when the double spend actually works, you might not be able to go back to that coffee shop. ;) Therefore, the risk of accepting such a small transaction with zero confirmations is ...


2

Depends on their infrastructure. If they use an intermediary (like bitpay or something) it will be instantaneus, since bitpay is the one that takes the risk for double spends and accepts payment fast. In case they have their own infrastructure, it may depend on what they do, if they accept one confirmation for the payment it may not take much otherwise it ...


2

Depends on your budget or technical expertise I guess. A. Install a wallet and create a new address. Post this address on the hotel's website and you are ready. This is the low tech solution and you would manually have to check the balance to see what payments are received. B. Use a gateway like BitPay. It works like a Paypal for Bitcoins. The payment will ...


1

You need to look into how you would integrate this with your current hotel management/bookkeeping/accounting software in addition to the ecommerce aspects. You may want to take a look at this https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/How_to_accept_Bitcoin,_for_small_businesses and http://www.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/1fbsb4/cashctrl_online_accounting_software_from/?...


1

If depends on your geographic preference and location in case you want to make it easier for national clients to use bitcoin as a payment transmission mechanism. But in case you are in the USA: Coinbase Bitpay


1

Accepting bitcoin is easy. Create an account on coinbase.com Go to: Linked Accounts -> Link a bank account. then Merchant Tools -> Merchant Settings -> Check, "Instantly exchange my bitcoins to USD and credit my primary bank account once a day." Add this to your event description: "Bitcoin Accepted w/ coinbase to info@yourdomain.com" If you want a ...


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