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22

First a bit of perspective on FPGA mining. ​ Around 2011 some miners started switching from GPUs to FPGAs, (Field Programmable Gate Arrays), after the first implementation of Bitcoin mining came out in Verilog, (a hardware design language that’s used to program FPGAs). The general rationale behind FPGAs is to try to get as close as possible to the ...


6

Yes, there are designs for Litecoin mining FPGA bitstreams, but they are not very efficient currently. ASICs are much more efficient and if anyone finds it lucrative to invest in development of Litecoin mining ASICs, they will push out GPU mining. (The efficiency ratio between ASIC and GPU will be lower than with Bitcoin though).


5

The statement "treat it as an FPGA" doesn't make sense. Both RAM and FPGA (or ASIC) are electronics but that's where the comparison ends. RAM is designed for one specific task and cannot by itself do calculations required for mining.


5

I have sent Butterfly several emails inquiring about delivery dates, and etc after pre-ordering the Jalapeno. I have yet to get a response back now 4 weeks later, I have sent them another request...this time asking for a refund. I think they should of put a lot more info out there about how long it would take to get our orders. I don't want my Miner next ...


4

Litecoin uses scrypt instead of sha as its crypto function. Scrypt is a memory hungry algo, so it's very difficult to have efficent implementation on ASIC or FPGA at current technology. This choice was made to prevent ASIC and FPGA specialized mining in favour of more diffuse and generalized mining with standard hardware. UPDATE After just about 3 months my ...


3

I'm a total newbie but so far the problem appears to be solvable. This is what I did with my Altera DE2-115 hooked-up to a Windows 7 machine: got fpgaminer's open source FPGA bitcoin miner on Github got mining proxy on bitcoin.cz set up an account with slushpool.com (had to use VPN because my ISP apparently blocks connections to slushpool over http :((( ) ...


3

Bitcoin mining is essentially just the repeated calculation of sha256 checksums. Given that sha256 is a fairly simple algorithm that uses only basic integer calculations absolutely any processor core should be capable of churning out sha256 checksums very quickly and any added complexity beyond the basic instructions required for sha256 is wasted. To that ...


3

See: Open Source FPGA miner and additional info


2

You could possibly buy some FPGA miners. The ASICs can only do Bitcoin's specific hash function, and won't be of any use for your research.


2

The data being hashed is constantly updated. The block header contains a time field and is updated every few seconds. If it doesn't timeout and reset (get new work), the algorithm will be working on a stale header. "When generating, you constantly hash the block header. The block is also occasionally updated as you are working on it." https://en....


2

An FPGA can do anything, by definition (Field Programmable Gate Array) they can run any bitstream you care to write for a specific task. The BIP0032 wallets you're thinking of however are 128bit keys with significant key stretching, so not a chance in hell will you ever crack one. That's by design.


2

Essentially no software supports the getwork call anymore due to the speed of modern miners (they would call it 25,000+ times a second). You’ll need to use a very old version of Bitcoin Core from before this was removed if you’d like your software to work, but the FPGA miner is inefficient enough to never make this worth the time investment. The specific ...


1

No. ASICs are Application Specific, so they can't do anything else. Not password cracking either. You can use them as an electric heater.


1

Your CPU would still be performing the calculations, and so you'd see a slower speed than if you used a CPU miner.


1

Knowing absolutely nothing about how this works, I would hypothesize: that others get the same work the longer you chew on the data, the higher the probability someone else has already solved the problem even if this is waiting on the network on each iteration, it starts the 1-second timer after getting the work


1

I am in London, United Kingdom. I selected the standard shipping option, which came to $38.00 (hardware was $149.00). I made my order back in April 2013, and they shipped in October 2013. ButterflyLabs used USPS (United States Postal Service) shipping option. I could track the order via the USPS site, although it says it got to the UK, and then was held - ...


1

In KC705_experimental, the readme says the device should return 0E33337A and two other results. It just so happens the bit of test work described in the readme has three different solutions to it. A mining script should return all three solutions to the server. fpgaminer, the author of the KC705_experimental code, has written an addon for the Modular ...


1

You could try reselling your FPGA board, especially if it is a fairly generic board rather than one purpose-built for mining. I remember having bought one for an electronics prototyping project. And some young electronics enthusiasts can be rather budget-constrained, so there are chances you can get (some) money for it, though surely nothing close to what ...


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