19

I don't think it is possible. There are a few problems to incentivizing the operation of nodes. When you pay people to run nodes, people running multiple nodes provide less value but earn more for the same effort. In the worst case, you may be paying botnets to run nodes on other people's hardware. It's hard to prove that you're actually validating, because ...


2

I think you've got your reasoning backwards. The reason we want more people to run nodes is because people only run nodes if they get value out of it, so more people running nodes means more people getting value. If you incentivized people to run nodes, then they would be running nodes even if they produced no value at all. Of what possible benefit would ...


2

Can bitcoin protocol be changed to add economic incentives to validating nodes? I think that would have to be a hard fork, a different currency. Maybe the validating nodes can somehow prove that they have verified the blocks Validation is not a service. No full nodes care whether other nodes do any validating. It isn't something anyone should pay for ...


2

For hierarchical deterministic wallets this is usually solved with a "gap limit". It means that when restoring from a recovery seed (or similar backup) the wallet will start checking for addresses until it finds a long enough run (e.g. 100) of unused addresses, and then it assumes that's all there is. Conversely, the wallet should not allow you to ...


1

To manage your own wallet independently without trusting anyone else, you can download and run Bitcoin Core. This is a full node software that will download and validate the entire blockchain and allow you to create encrypted wallets on your own computer. To get started with Bitcoin Core, you can either download it from bitcoincore.org or compile it directly ...


1

Though not the answer, I’d like to put some light on whether nodes should or should not be rewarded for validation: using a light node wallet puts the wallet itself at (limited) risk rather than the whole network. For example even if all full nodes are malicious, users can resort to running their own full-nodes (there are less likely fork scenarios though). ...


1

If you're positive your /var/lib/tor/onion_auth/zerotobtc.auth_private file on your client is correct (a single line, containing: {replace-with-your-onion-url-without-the-extension}:descriptor:x25519:{replace-with-your-base32-encoded-private-key}) then the most likely reason it isn't working is your file permissions aren't allowing Tor to read the file. Try ...


1

However, as we know that things are driven more by market economics rather than philanthropic or feel good factors. Running a bitcoin node is more than just helping the network. One recent tweet summarizes it in the best way possible, running a node is nothing but downloading the bitcoin implementation software, install and run like lot of other software: ...


1

There are few minor reasons why this might to useful for an electrum server: Knowing what block height / protocol version other peers are operating via features advertised by peers to verify network issues Banning bad peers via blacklisted peer list


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